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Published: November 01, 2017

poster_1_4X6_ENG_1.2.jpgPrint is powerful. Humans crave the tactile satisfaction of print and studies have shown that we attribute greater significance, understanding, credibility, and memorability to physical materials. The proof is in one illustrative statistic: data reveals that sales of e-books continue to fall, while sales of paperbound books rise.

 

HP has announced a major milestone catalysing this print renaissance. Today, it completed its acquisition of Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.’s printer business.

 

This strategic investment positions HP to accelerate its disruption of the $55 billion A3 copier segment, with an expanded portfolio of next-generation multifunction printers that provide greater reliability and uptime, breakthrough economics, superior ease of use, and improved customer experience.

 

 

“Our teams are off to a strong start with a strategic plan to disrupt and capture A3 growth, grow managed print and document services, and drive the shift from transactional to contractual sales,” says Enrique Lores, President, Imaging & Printing Business, HP Inc.

 

World-class printing team

HP celebrated the welcome of Samsung employees; together they now make up the strongest, most innovative team in the industry in both A3 and A4 printing. The acquisition builds on the strengths of both companies, which share a proven culture of engineering innovation, R&D, and a commitment to the highest standards in quality print solutions.

 

Samsung brings a powerful IP portfolio, formidable employees, and a compelling A3 product line up, along with advanced expertise in laser printer technology, imaging electronics, mobile-first and cloud-first UX. They deliver a unique advantage with printer supplies and accessories to support unmatched future market growth opportunities. Samsung’s printing technologies and laser expertise will immediately broaden and strengthen HP’s A3 print portfolio, grow its leading A4 laser printing portfolio, add more than 6,500 printing patents to HP’s IP portfolio.   

 

These assets combine with HP’s leading position in print, unmatched sales channel, distribution depth, and operational excellence to provide both customers and partners with a portfolio that delivers unprecedented price, quality, and performance compared to service-intensive conventional copiers.

 

Lores says, “The entire HP team extends a very warm welcome to Samsung employees as they join our HP family. We are more committed than ever to Print and are investing in our portfolio, technology and talent to make our company even stronger.”

    Corporate
Published: November 15, 2017

 

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When it comes to windows on the soul, eyes can’t compete with photos. After all, what reflects a person’s personal brand more authentically than images, especially those that we select to commit to paper. 

 

Think about your work space. Whose photos surround you? Family, friends, special moments in your life and career. But what if you felt you couldn’t share your most important people and connections? HP understands that some individuals simply don’t feel safe bringing their whole selves to work. Long a leader in the diversity and inclusion space, the company continues to work to change this experience for all people. In support of that effort, today, HP is launching Proud Portraits, the third spot in the Reinvent Mindsets campaign

 

Even though—perhaps because—HP has been at the forefront of building an inclusive workplace (the company’s earliest LGBTQ employee resource groups started more than 30 years ago) it understands the heartbreaking statistics: that 31% of closeted employees fear losing connections with coworkers, that 23% fear they might not be offered development or advancement opportunities, that nearly one in 10 LGBTQ employees have left a job because the environment was unwelcoming, and that more than one-third of LGBTQ employees had hid their personal lives at work.

 

But more importantly, HP knows the people behind those statistics. The employee who is participating in a phone-in LGBTQ focus group but is typing her answers because she’s uncomfortable with the possibility that she might be overheard. Or the trans new hire who is nervous about their bathroom options. HP is working hard to create an empathetic, inclusive environment where employees feel so supported that they are empowered to come out to their friends, family, and coworkers. 

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At HP, it’s all about creating a workplace that celebrates diversity and welcomes everyone in. In fact, the company is deep into a journey to reinvent the standard for diversity and inclusion with a mission to become THE employer of choice for underserved and underrepresented groups, including LGBTQ people. It’s about creating a welcoming environment for communities like the LGBTQ one—no matter where they are in their own personal journey of expression, the company is building a place where every person is encouraged to bring their whole self to work no matter what their preferred pronoun is. HP is building on the acclaimed Reinvent Mindsets campaign through Proud Portraits with the message that the company is hiring and talent is the only criteria; the new spot joins Let’s get in touch and Dads and Daughters.

 

Lisa Gunning, director of the spot, says, “I’m incredibly proud to be a part of this inspirational project. The LGBTQ community is made up of truly courageous people and it’s our hope that pieces like this will honor their courage, respect their pride in their families, and instill additional confidence in themselves. People trust the HP brand, it’s a household name. So, when HP demonstrates its commitment to all families, it catalyzes real change.”

 

Partnership with Out in Tech

Furthering our commitment to become the employer of choice among the LGBTQ community, HP has become an exclusive matching sponsor for Out in Tech’s Fall Fundraising Campaign, Technically Equal. Out in Tech’s mission is to unite the LGBTQ and tech communities by providing resources, support, and connections to new opportunities. Over the past year and a half, Out in Tech has built more than 40 websites for groups around the world to help support LGBTQ activists and groups. These sites are especially critical to connect individuals in countries where simply being yourself can put you at risk of imprisonment, and even death.HP_LGBTQ_Family3.jpg

 

 

Andrew Lowenthal, Executive Director, Out in Tech, says, “We love how HP works to Reinvent Mindsets by amplifying underrepresented voices in tech, and by joining forces we will leverage the expertise and passion within both of our communities.  A few years ago, five friends who were “out” and “in tech” went to a bar—now we’re nearly 15,000 members and growing.  We look forward to scaling our organization and impact even further in 2018 with HP’s generous support.”

 

HP will also be a champion sponsor of the Digital Corps event in San Francisco on Saturday, December 2, 2017. During the event, teams will build ten new websites, primarily for organizations that support LGBTQ youth.

 

Andrew explains, “On behalf of Out in Tech, I am thrilled to welcome HP as our exclusive matching funds sponsor for our Technically Equal campaign.  We look far and wide for companies and organizations that share our values and ideals of bolstering diversity in tech, and your corporate leadership came to us with a clear and unequivocal message: We support LGBTQ techies and we want IN!”

 

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We want to leverage the full power of HP's allied community. You can show your support in a few ways:

  • Donate directly to Out in Tech - HP will match all donations for Technically Equal
  • Share your own story, as an LGBTQ employee or ally at HP
  • Share your pride in HP as an inclusive workplace by sharing our spot and diversity & inclusion website

 

Helpful Links for Sharing

Published: November 02, 2017

reinvent1.jpgToday marks our second anniversary as HP Inc. To celebrate this milestone, and our role as an innovation leader and founder of Silicon Valley, HP has invited thought leaders from organizations as diverse as IDEO, SoundHound Inc. and Wisdom VC to reimagine new possibilities in the way that people design and create, secure and protect, sustain and explore. The ‘Future Powered by Reinvention’ event will showcase technology shaping the future while reinventing the human experience today.  

 

With like-minded creative thinkers, influential visionaries, and business leaders, we’ll spark conversations about the rapid pace of the world around us and how we stay ahead of change to innovate, adapt, reinvent, and engineer experiences for a future that promises to look very different from today. To guide us into the future, we look to major socio-economic, demographic and technological trends occurring across the globe. These "megatrends" will have a sustained, transformative impact on the world in the years ahead and will influencer how we:   

 

Design and create with digital manufacturing. For the last 150 years or so, we’ve approached manufacturing in basically the same centralized way: design in one location, manufacture in a low-cost geography or in large automated facilities, then load goods on container ships and sent around the world. Not a scalable model in a world of rapid growth and urbanization.  

 

Digital manufacturing will drive profound changes in the business landscape. Digitally designed, digitally printed or manufactured on demand for industries including healthcare, consumer goods, automotive, and aerospace. No staging, no warehouses. HP and channel partners are in a unique position with regard to 3D print technology, which is at the heart of this manufacturing transformation. HP’s Multi Jet Fusion—alone among leading 3D contenders—has end-to-end digital capability and a growing range of printable materials is rapidly expanding across manufacturing applications. In five-years, we’ll see an increasing number of parts and objects manufactured in this way, at or near the point of use.   

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Secure and protect with cyber trust and security. Innovation is not the exclusive domain of the good guys. Security threats on the horizon are going to force a fundamental change in the way we approach development and design, driving a need for cyber security into places you’d never expect to need it. It’s at the cellular level, literally, when we are looking at hacked pacemakers and the ability to edit DNA.  

 

It’s our responsibility as technologists, and as humans, to focus on security and on how we can get to a new model for a safer future. Cyber-resiliency is a proactive security concept that, much like a healthy immune system provides a barrier against disease, would start with barriers to intrusion. Beyond that, the focus is on immediate detection and auto-response to isolate and neutralize the threat, extract it and come back to a known state. Cyber-resilient design is already fundamental to building the world’s most advanced security into HP’s current personal systems and printers.  

 

Sustain and explore with AI and machine learning. The notion of artificial intelligence is hardly new; our industry has been pursuing the potential of AI for almost 40 years. We're now at a point where the algorithms, compute capabilities, and exponentially increasing flow of data are turning the AI vision into reality. We’re at the tip of the iceberg with big data—collecting immense amounts of information, and using advanced analytics to sift through and find insights.  

 

Where AI will gain game-changing traction, however, is in the rise of machine learning. Machine learning helps AI to actually digest that data: identifying patterns that help us see meaning. Early AI applications are arriving in the form of bots, already in customer service engines, and collecting information to continuously refine their performance.    machine.jpg

 

In education, we’ll see commercial virtual reality, but also learning analytics and adaptive learning based on AI; in healthcare, we’ll see chatbots, virtual assistants, and bionics that use AI; and in aerospace, we’ll see exploring robots and space probes that will go where no man has been before.  

 

The ‘Future Powered by Reinvention’  

At our headquarters in Palo Alto, we’ll offer a unique tour of HP’s labs and bring together visionaries working on what's next. In addition to megatrends, a compelling experiential event will highlight HP breakthrough innovation from our labs focused on immersive experiences, 3D, and emerging compute including virtual and augmented reality, 3D printing and artificial intelligence.  

 

A panel, moderated by Fast Company, will spotlight the most important technologies influencing the human experience today—and which ones will be most important the next five to ten years. Panellists include David Webster, Head of Product and Technology at IDEO, Josh Kauffman, Founder of Wisdom VC, Rachel Sibley, Futurist, Kathleen McMahon, VP and GM, SoundHound and Chandrakant Patel, HP Senior Fellow and Chief Engineer.

 

More on today’s news and event can be found here.

 

Published: September 25, 2017

 

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A year ago, HP announced a quest with our agencies to transform the advertising industry. We challenged partners to significantly increase the number of women and U.S. minorities in top creative and strategic roles on our accounts.

Admittedly, an announcement is just words — and, over the years, there have been too many promises from all corners of the business world to diversify without enough action. In 2016, we stated that the time for just talk is over. Today, we are publishing the first proof of our commitment and, more importantly, sharing our learnings and path forward.

Overall, our five global agencies made significant progress. They increased the participation of women, and all but one noticeably increased the number of women in senior leadership roles. Today, 61 percent of people working on our account and 51 percent of people in senior leadership roles are female. This is 5 percent and 4 percent ahead, respectively, of the agencies’ self-imposed targets.

While advancements have been made, particularly in the second half of 2017, work remains in increasing representation among U.S. minorities. Three out of five agencies saw a positive, upward trend in minority representation. However, minority representation was still below target for 60 percent of HP’s global agencies. Overall, 8 percent of all employee growth across HP’s global agencies year-over-year were minorities.

Besides announcing our progress, HP is updating the challenge for 2018 by asking agency partners to define specific underrepresented groups by country and set clear objectives, measurements and plans to increase diverse talent on HP business. We’re also proud to be working with the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity on a new program that will enable underrepresented talent to network and get a foot in the door of the creativity community.

The numbers, however, are only part of the story. Sharing our learnings is the most important and lasting contribution of our journey. These findings include:

 

Industry transformation requires a holistic and systemic approach.

To transform the industry, we need to simultaneously increase representation and improve inclusion in three sectors: clients, agencies and production houses with a focus on directors. If these three sectors do not move at the same time, we will not be able to deliver the type of work that our diverse audiences require.

Clients analyze data, identify audiences and write the briefs. Agencies generate the creative work to emotionally connect with customers. Directors bring that work to life through their unique interpretation. The process is an alchemistic combination of deep analytics and creativity. Having a diverse mindset included throughout the process will ensure we are connecting with our customers more effectively.

 

The key to transformation is client activation.

Clients drive the advertising industry. They own the paycheck and set priorities. A group of committed clients could change the industry overnight.

But clients cannot require from the agencies something that they themselves are not doing. So clients need to work on improving representation on their marketing teams while creating the inclusive environment necessary for sustainable results.

At HP, we started by working on our marketing and communications teams first. Today 50 percent of HP’s most senior roles are held by women; 70 percent of our leaders have had meaningful experiences outside the U.S. and 30 percent are other underrepresented groups. We waited to have our house in order before we invited agencies to participate in the process.

In retrospect, I believe that we could have accelerated change by moving client and agencies together. Each one committing to the other. Jointly setting plans and meeting to improve representation and inclusion. 

 

Objectives and plans must be set by the agencies not by the client.

What gets measured gets done. No strategic initiative ever moved without objectives, specific plans of actions and measurement. Agencies need to have skin in this transformation game. They need to set and own their own numbers, develop their own plans and report back progress against these objectives.

Each of our agencies was able to set a stretch goal toward increasing the percentage of women and people of color working on our account. They were able to define their own plan of action. The results we reported are due to their commitment and hard work.

 

Accountability is everything.

Another key step in driving the numbers was the establishment of quarterly reviews.

In each quarterly meeting, we met agency CEOs individually to monitor progress. We discussed challenges and opportunities. They also shared the programs they created in order to increase diversity recruitment and inclusion. More than 15 of these programs were developed by the agencies.

The quarterly meeting was critical, as was CEO involvement. Both ensured that progress was being made. If what gets measured gets done, what gets reported becomes your bond.

 

Free the Bid was an amazing change catalyst for agencies and production houses.

Alma Ha’el‘s organization, Free the Bid, ensures that every RFP or “bid” for production includes at least one female director. In an industry driven by the momentum of the tried and true award-winning directors, 95 percent of which are men, this was an enormous step forward.

Additionally, their website now showcases more than 450 women directors, allowing agencies, production houses and clients the opportunity to review the reels of these outstanding women directors. The impact has been huge. Through Free the Bid, HP and our agencies have discovered extraordinary talent that has delivered impactful, business driving creative work.

HP will continue to fund Free the Bid’s efforts to give women director’s equal opportunities to bid on commercial jobs in the global advertising industry.

To improve numbers of underrepresented minorities we need to strengthen our resources for qualified diverse candidates. 

We did not make strong progress with U.S. minorities. We learned the hard way that neither external agencies nor our own internal recruitment teams had a meaningful pipeline of diverse candidates to fill our teams. It took several rounds of revisions to get to the right candidate profile. This was hard work and required commitment and focus from the top leaders. As we move forward, our companies will need to tap into different sources for talent identification like specialized agencies and universities with high diverse populations.

 

The time for action is now. 

Transforming our industry requires a holistic and systemic approach. Clients should drive.

But agencies and production houses must do their part.

Transformation is definitely possible, but it requires commitment, focus and bold action.

The time for talk is over. The time for action is now.

 

Published: September 10, 2017

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HP’s Security Advisory Board enlists a trio of security experts to help it triumph in a malicious new world.

 

For decades, hackers fell squarely into two camps: “black hats” in it to show off their skills, and then later, for money, espionage and data theft, and “white hats” who breached systems to uncover flaws before the bad guys could find them and make sure companies promptly fix them.

Now, destruction for destruction’s sake has become a hallmark of the global cyberattack.  The foremost example being the 2012 Shamoon attack in Saudi Arabia on one of the world's largest oil companies, that wiped or destroyed 35,000 computers before the devastation was halted. Similar attacks aiming to render PC hardware inoperable have continued since, with Shamoon 2.0 earlier this year or even some of the NotPetya variants more recently. With malicious actors everywhere looking for any possible exploit, one key to surviving the constant escalation of threats is to keep reinventing how you stay ahead of the game.

A new Security Advisory Board organized by HP aims to do just that, by bringing a trio of outside security experts inside the company. All three initial members have unique first-hand expertise in the world of hacking and the latest developments in security technology and strategies.  

Michael CalceMichael CalceThe board builds on over two decades of HP leadership in cybersecurity for endpoint devices. As the world’s largest PC manufacturer and leading maker of printers, HP has driven a slew of security innovations, from technology that provides cryptographically secure updates of a device’s BIOS to run-time intrusion detection, which checks for anomalies, automatically rebooting when an intrusion is detected.

These security experts will act as a reconnaissance team, providing insights from the front lines that the company will use to reinforce its own security work. The board will also generate strategic conversations about the rapidly shifting security landscape with HP executives and the market. 

“We want to be the sharpest we can be on what the future holds, understanding the threat landscape today and being able to address the real problems of tomorrow,” says Boris Balacheff, HP’s chief technologist for system security research and innovation. 

The person HP chose to lead the advisory board is far from your run-of-the-mill corporate security expert. The new chairman, security consultant Michael Calce, a.k.a. “Mafiaboy,” launched his public career in 2000 at the age of 15 by unleashing a massive cyberattack that brought down Yahoo!, eBay and Amazon. It led to an FBI manhunt and $1.7 billion in economic fallout.  

Robert MasseRobert MasseJoining him is Robert Masse, a partner at a major consulting firm (acting independently in this instance), with more than 20 years of experience in cybersecurity, focusing on risk management and – ironically – a shared history with Calce. Following his own run-in with law enforcement over hacking when he was a teen, Masse provided guidance to Calce after his arrest.

A third member is Justine Bone, who began her career doing reverse engineering and vulnerability research at New Zealand’s version of the U.S. National Security Agency before leading security for companies, including Bloomberg LP. She’s now the CEO of MedSec, which analyzes technology security for healthcare companies.Justine BoneJustine Bone

The Security Advisory Board will work with HP to identify evolving threats and help companies adapt to the fundamental changes taking place in the security landscape. One of these changes is that inadequate security can’t be hidden anymore; the hackers’ armory is too deep and sophisticated and automated attack tools are constantly on the lookout for flaws to exploit. Bone says it takes only two and a half minutes after you plug in a smart camera or screw in a smart light bulb for an internet bot to compromise that device. Billions of connected devices span every inch of our economy and our lives, from supply chains and energy grids to connected cars.

That’s putting everyone under a microscope, from the top of the chain to the bottom. “Security has become an imperative for our customers,” says HP’s Balacheff.  With the average U.S. breach costing $7 million and intensifying scrutiny from consumers and investors, it’s increasingly clear that everyone throughout an organization, from a company’s security group up to the board, needs to be involved in anticipating security threats. “Originally cybersecurity was an IT problem. What we’re seeing is now it's being heavily looked at by the board and the audit and risk committee and treated like any other risk,” says Masse. “I think now's the time where we really have the opportunity to improve things at a much better level than before.”

Additionally, organizations need help understanding just how profoundly the thinking behind security strategy needs to change. Traditionally, companies felt that software or network security solutions would be the answer, however with the evolution of attacker sophistication and our increased dependency on devices for everything we do, it is no longer that simple. Security needs to start at the lowest level of hardware and firmware design.

When baby monitors are conscripted into botnets to launch assaults that take down Twitter and Netflix, it’s clear that any connected device can be attacked. And as the flood of network-connected gadgets continues to rise — 20 billion such devices are expected to be in service by 2020 — this challenge will only grow.

That’s why every device must be built from the ground up to be secure and able to adapt, says Calce. This principle is one the tech industry has always preached, but hasn’t always practiced. An example of this, Calce explains, is when a computer or printer boots up: up to a million lines of code can be executed before the device’s operating system is even loaded, in what is known the device's 'firmware' (often still referred to as BIOS in PCs). This occurs before the user is even able to see any kind of welcome screen. Designing protections, but also the ability to detect attack and recover a compromised device, that is how far HP has gone, trailblazing the future of endpoint security by designing hardware-enforced cyber-resilient devices.

“For years,” says Bone, “software and hardware makers were able to rely on security by obscurity. There was no upside to building in this quality all the way through the product because nobody was asking questions. Now, though, people are definitely asking.”

That’s where HP has been focused for years. The security board members say it’s paying off — that’s why they’re eager to work with HP to get this message out. 

“HP is looking to implement security on anything and everything they develop,” says Calce. “That’s the type of mindset we need if we ever want to have some level of security in this world.”

For more information on how HP is creating the most secure business devices in the world visit www.hp.com/reinventsecurity.