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Published: August 28, 2017

Dion Weisler, CEO, HP, Inc., and  Punit Renjen, CEO, Deloitte GlobalDion Weisler, CEO, HP, Inc., and Punit Renjen, CEO, Deloitte Global

Steam. Electricity. Automation. Each fueled an industrial revolution that changed how humans live and work. The Fourth Industrial Revolution will surpass all previous ones in size, shape, scope, and more importantly, complexity. Now, HP and Deloitte will accelerate this revolution through an unprecedented partnership.

Last week, HP and Deloitte hosted an event at HP’s Palo Alto headquarters to announce a major strategic alliance to digitally transform the $12 trillion global manufacturing industry. The partnership will bring together HP’s groundbreaking Multi Jet Fusion 3D printing solutions and unique partner ecosystem, with Deloitte’s global client reach, deep manufacturing relationships, and expertise in supply chain transformation.  

“Nothing’s really changed much in terms of manufacturing in almost 100 years. And it’s time, because there is a better mousetrap. There is a meaningful way to make a very broad impact on the way companies all around the world design, procure, manufacture, and deliver their products to customers,” said HP CEO Dion Weisler.

This digital industrial revolution will fundamentally change how the world designs, produces, distributes, and experiences everything. And the implications are astonishing: the World Economic Forum has estimated the benefit of this digital transformation the benefit of this digital transformation across the world’s largest industries—automotive, aerospace, medical technology, electronics, consumer goods, engineering, heavy industry—to business and society at $100 trillion over the next 10 years alone.

Weisler joined Deloitte Global Chief Executive Officer Punit Renjen to describe how a new wave of disruptive technologies—from artificial intelligence to robotics to big data to the Internet of Things—are driving unprecedented change in the world. Yet much of the world’s manufacturing systems have remained stuck in the analog era, tied to outdated thinking, tools, and processes that have become resource-intensive and economically inefficient.
Gil Perez, SVP, IoT and Distributed Manufacturing, SAP; Bob Jones, EVP , Global Sales and Services, Siemens ; Joe Sendra, VP Manufacturing/Technology, Johnson & Johnson; Doug Gish, Manufacturing Strategy Leader, Deloitte; Michelle Bockman (moderator), Global Head of 3D Printing Commercial Expansion & Development, HP Inc.Gil Perez, SVP, IoT and Distributed Manufacturing, SAP; Bob Jones, EVP , Global Sales and Services, Siemens ; Joe Sendra, VP Manufacturing/Technology, Johnson & Johnson; Doug Gish, Manufacturing Strategy Leader, Deloitte; Michelle Bockman (moderator), Global Head of 3D Printing Commercial Expansion & Development, HP Inc.This is the massive opportunity for 3D printing: to unleash entirely new ways of making things to befit our all-digital future, making life better for everyone, everywhere. This new manufacturing model will unlock unmatched economic potential, enabling capital to be redeployed to new areas, shortening supply chains, reducing carbon emissions, and eliminating production waste and inventory.

A highlight of the event was a panel, led by Michelle Bockman, HP’s new Global Head of 3D Printing Commercial Expansion & Development, and featuring manufacturing leaders from SAP, Siemens, Johnson & Johnson, and Deloitte. A technology showcase displayed innovative new parts produced by HP’s 3D printing solutions.

 

Watch the announcement.

Watch the panel discussion.

Learn more about HP 3D printing and printing solutions.

    3D Printing Leadership
Published: November 15, 2017

 

HP_LGBTQ_Family1.jpg

 

When it comes to windows on the soul, eyes can’t compete with photos. After all, what reflects a person’s personal brand more authentically than images, especially those that we select to commit to paper. 

 

Think about your work space. Whose photos surround you? Family, friends, special moments in your life and career. But what if you felt you couldn’t share your most important people and connections? HP understands that some individuals simply don’t feel safe bringing their whole selves to work. Long a leader in the diversity and inclusion space, the company continues to work to change this experience for all people. In support of that effort, today, HP is launching Proud Portraits, the third spot in the Reinvent Mindsets campaign

 

Even though—perhaps because—HP has been at the forefront of building an inclusive workplace (the company’s earliest LGBTQ employee resource groups started more than 30 years ago) it understands the heartbreaking statistics: that 31% of closeted employees fear losing connections with coworkers, that 23% fear they might not be offered development or advancement opportunities, that nearly one in 10 LGBTQ employees have left a job because the environment was unwelcoming, and that more than one-third of LGBTQ employees had hid their personal lives at work.

 

But more importantly, HP knows the people behind those statistics. The employee who is participating in a phone-in LGBTQ focus group but is typing her answers because she’s uncomfortable with the possibility that she might be overheard. Or the trans new hire who is nervous about their bathroom options. HP is working hard to create an empathetic, inclusive environment where employees feel so supported that they are empowered to come out to their friends, family, and coworkers. 

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At HP, it’s all about creating a workplace that celebrates diversity and welcomes everyone in. In fact, the company is deep into a journey to reinvent the standard for diversity and inclusion with a mission to become THE employer of choice for underserved and underrepresented groups, including LGBTQ people. It’s about creating a welcoming environment for communities like the LGBTQ one—no matter where they are in their own personal journey of expression, the company is building a place where every person is encouraged to bring their whole self to work no matter what their preferred pronoun is. HP is building on the acclaimed Reinvent Mindsets campaign through Proud Portraits with the message that the company is hiring and talent is the only criteria; the new spot joins Let’s get in touch and Dads and Daughters.

 

Lisa Gunning, director of the spot, says, “I’m incredibly proud to be a part of this inspirational project. The LGBTQ community is made up of truly courageous people and it’s our hope that pieces like this will honor their courage, respect their pride in their families, and instill additional confidence in themselves. People trust the HP brand, it’s a household name. So, when HP demonstrates its commitment to all families, it catalyzes real change.”

 

Partnership with Out in Tech

Furthering our commitment to become the employer of choice among the LGBTQ community, HP has become an exclusive matching sponsor for Out in Tech’s Fall Fundraising Campaign, Technically Equal. Out in Tech’s mission is to unite the LGBTQ and tech communities by providing resources, support, and connections to new opportunities. Over the past year and a half, Out in Tech has built more than 40 websites for groups around the world to help support LGBTQ activists and groups. These sites are especially critical to connect individuals in countries where simply being yourself can put you at risk of imprisonment, and even death.HP_LGBTQ_Family3.jpg

 

 

Andrew Lowenthal, Executive Director, Out in Tech, says, “We love how HP works to Reinvent Mindsets by amplifying underrepresented voices in tech, and by joining forces we will leverage the expertise and passion within both of our communities.  A few years ago, five friends who were “out” and “in tech” went to a bar—now we’re nearly 15,000 members and growing.  We look forward to scaling our organization and impact even further in 2018 with HP’s generous support.”

 

HP will also be a champion sponsor of the Digital Corps event in San Francisco on Saturday, December 2, 2017. During the event, teams will build ten new websites, primarily for organizations that support LGBTQ youth.

 

Andrew explains, “On behalf of Out in Tech, I am thrilled to welcome HP as our exclusive matching funds sponsor for our Technically Equal campaign.  We look far and wide for companies and organizations that share our values and ideals of bolstering diversity in tech, and your corporate leadership came to us with a clear and unequivocal message: We support LGBTQ techies and we want IN!”

 

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We want to leverage the full power of HP's allied community. You can show your support in a few ways:

  • Donate directly to Out in Tech - HP will match all donations for Technically Equal
  • Share your own story, as an LGBTQ employee or ally at HP
  • Share your pride in HP as an inclusive workplace by sharing our spot and diversity & inclusion website

 

Helpful Links for Sharing

Published: November 14, 2017

Cheryl MacleodCheryl Macleod

One of the biggest factors in HP’s rise as the world’s innovation leader in 3D printing, the disruptive technology set to transform the $12 trillion global manufacturing industry, is a long heritage of printing leadership and reinvention that goes back decades.

The building blocks of HP’s groundbreaking Multi Jet Fusion 3D printing technology are actually rooted in one of the company’s most historic innovations, thermal Inkjet technology, which remains the gold standard for home and office printers some 30 years later.

For a good example of how HP’s past continues to inform its future, look no further than the 23-year company veteran who was recently appointed to lead one of its most cutting-edge organizations: Cheryl Macleod, HP’s new Global Head of 3D Fusion Science.

 

One thing that links your interests in science, cooking, and travel is a love of learning. What are some of your earliest memories of learning?

My earliest memories of learning weren’t in school, they were at home with my older brother, trying to keep up with him. I’ve always had a bit of a competitive streak. In first grade when he came home and said, “I know how to read,” I went straight to my mom and said “I want to read, too!” I also remember my mom taking us out on nature walks and looking under every rock and stump to see what creatures might be living there. That really taught me the value of experiential learning.

What drew you to science as a career?

I actually wanted to be a musician, but didn’t think it would pay the bills. I was really good in math and science so I got my bachelor’s degree in biomedical engineering. But then I decided to change my focus to chemical engineering and went to UC Berkeley with the intent of getting a masters in that area, but then I switched again to a PhD program so I could spend more time doing hands-on research instead of sitting in a library. It’s that love of experiential learning again.

How did that bring you to HP?

The research in my PhD program was in the area of surface and colloid chemistry, which involves studying the relationships between properties in materials that are too small to be seen with the naked eye. It was that fascination with extremely small things that brought me to HP’s Inkjet business. The technology behind it is essentially teeny tiny drops shooting out of really complex but small devices to make incredible images on paper. I was hooked.

You’ve been here for 23 years in a multitude of R&D roles. How have you seen the company evolve?

When I joined the company, Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard had both recently retired but they were still an incredibly strong presence, and most of the leaders in the company had worked with them directly. But then in subsequent years, I think the company began to move towards focusing more on short-term results than the big innovation picture that Bill and Dave founded it on. In the last two years it’s been really exciting to see our entire leadership team take the company back to its roots and reinfuse it with big, long-term commitments to innovation, talent, and disruptive technologies like 3D printing.

Who have your greatest mentors been?

There have been many, but the one who sticks out most was my first director at HP. I remember during my second week here I was invited to have a one-on-one with him. I was so struck that in this lab of literally hundreds of people, the director would take the time to meet with every new employee just to get to know them. That’s something I’ve always carried with me. Whenever I join a new organization I try to meet with every single person within the first few months. So many people have told me, “That’s never happened in my career before.” But for me it’s normal because it happened to me in my second week at HP.

Your new job is leading the Fusion Science organization for HP’s 3D printing business. What exactly does that team do, and what are your goals for it?

We focus on developing the deep science behind the materials that drive our business: the powders and agents that are used in 3D printing with Multi Jet Fusion. We take a very rigorous scientific and engineering approach to understanding and developing both our HP-branded agents and the ones developed by our materials partners. We lead the materials certification process and work directly with our partners to develop their materials and bring them to market. Our biggest long-term goal is to expand the breadth and applications of 3D printing materials to rival the amount used in traditional manufacturing, which is a number in the thousands. We’ve got our work cut out for us.

One of your biggest passions is cooking. What lessons from cooking have you applied to your work?

Well, cooking is all about chemistry: taking things through mixing, processing, and heating to create completely different things. In Indian cooking, the list of ingredients for each dish can sound nearly identical: the same basic spices, the same kinds of vegetables and rice. But the nuance is in the process you use for each one: do you add a certain spice first or last? Is it whole our ground? How long should it simmer? The process has a huge impact on how the dish comes out. So at work I make sure our engineers are very rigorous in documenting their processes in how they fuse things together. It really makes all the difference.

How has being a woman informed your career in a traditionally male-dominated field?

Before I came to HP, I interviewed with a few other companies. Each time, lunchtime would roll around and they’d trot out “The Woman” who worked there to have lunch with me to show me how good their diversity was, which of course wasn’t very convincing at all. Then I came to HP. I didn’t talk to a single woman during my interviews, but as I was walking down the hallways there were women working everywhere: in the labs, on the engineering teams, on the product teams. Nobody went out of their way to try and convince me that HP was a diverse company because I could see it with my own two eyes. As much as anything, that’s what brought me here.

Published: November 09, 2017

 

HP Jet Fusion 32 4200 printersHP Jet Fusion 32 4200 printers

3D printing is one of the most disruptive technologies of our time, spearheading a new 4th Industrial Revolution that will radically change the way we conceive, design, produce, distribute, and consume pretty much everything.

But until now, 3D printing hasn’t been a viable means of large-scale industrial manufacturing (think big factories) because of prohibitively expensive production costs and limited technology. In order to realize HP’s vision of digitally transforming the $12 trillion global manufacturing industry, the economics of 3D printing needed to be completely rewritten.

Today, HP announced that it has smashed that economic barrier and paved the way for cost-effective, industrial-scale 3D manufacturing with the new Jet Fusion 3D 4210 Printing Solution.

The new solution increases production volume for HP Jet Fusion 3D printers by enabling continuous operation, greater overall system efficiency, and the ability handle larger quantities of 3D printing materials, while significantly lowering production costs with reduced pricing on HP’s 3D materials and shared service contracts.

When put together with HP’s industry-leading Multi Jet Fusion technology, those enhancements double the existing “break-even point” at which 3D printing remains cost-effective to an unprecedented 110,000 parts, and drastically reduces the cost-per-part, up to 65% less than other methods.

“The new 3D 4210 Printing Solution enables our customers to mass-produce parts using HP’s Multi Jet Fusion technology for significantly less than other processes, and fully benefit from the economies of scale,” said Ramon Pastor, General Manager of Multi Jet Fusion for HP’s 3D printing business. “HP’s Jet Fusion 3D systems have now reached a technological and economic inflection point that combines the speed, quality, and scalability needed to accelerate manufacturing’s digital industrial revolution.”

Today, HP also announced the further expansion of its industry-first Open Materials Platform, a collaborative development and distribution model where HP and its growing ecosystem of 3D partners work together to drive materials innovation, reduce costs, and create new applications and markets for Multi Jet Fusion technology. There are already over 50 leading companies actively engaged on the platform.Materials companies can use HP’s Materials Development Kit to quickly test compatibility with Jet Fusion printers.Materials companies can use HP’s Materials Development Kit to quickly test compatibility with Jet Fusion printers.

 

It was announced that leading chemical companies Dressler Group and Lubrizol have joined the growing HP 3D partner ecosystem, and also that three new three new engineering-grade 3D printing materials are coming to the open platform: PA 11, PA 12 Glass Beads, and Polypropylene.

The new materials raise the bar on production quality, strength, versatility, and flexibility, but only one of them is going to space (for now).

The new HP 3D High Reusability PA 12 Glass Beads, an innovative new nylon material filled with tiny glass beads, was used to make one of the most complex parts in a specially-designed HP ENVY Zero-Gravity printer developed with NASA that’s being sent to the International Space Station this February. The printer’s output tray needed to be particularly lightweight, watertight, and durable for its journey to space, and 3D printing with PA 12 Glass Beads provided the perfect solution.

HP continues to unlock the economics and technology of 3D manufacturing, with a deeply-engaged network of partners committed to accelerating the digital industrial revolution.

Says Corey Weber, co-founder of leading printing service bureau Forecast 3D, “It has never been more clear to us that HP’s Multi Jet Fusion represents the future of digital manufacturing.”

Published: October 06, 2017

Corey Weber Co-Founder, Forecast 3DCorey Weber Co-Founder, Forecast 3D3D printing’s digital industrial revolution is in its early days, but it’s already being embraced across the full spectrum of the manufacturing business from major industries and large enterprises to independent local purveyors known as printing service bureaus.

 

Recently, Forecast 3D, one of the oldest and largest privately-owned service bureaus in the U.S., became the first to offer full-scale 3D manufacturing with the installation of 12 HP 3D printing units.

 

In honor of tomorrow’s Manufacturing Day 2017, Forecast 3D Co-Founder Corey Weber discusses how that capability has transformed his business, and how it foretells a far greater disruption of the global manufacturing industry ahead.

 

 

What does Forecast 3D do?

 

IMG_0899.jpgMy brother Donovan and I started Forecast 3D back in 1994 as a rapid prototyping service bureau. Rapid prototyping is the original term for 3D printing, which back then was just becoming a viable way to quickly make revisions to prototypes of various things. HP’s Multi Jet Fusion has allowed us to use our prototyping prowess to expand into full-scale, end-to-end 3D production, but more on that later.

 

We started the company in a 500 square-foot space down by the beach here in Carlsbad, California with a $5,000 loan from our grandfather. Modest beginnings for sure. But we quickly became known for the high quality of our products and services and grew very fast. Today we have 49,000 square feet of 3D printing goodness using the latest manufacturing technologies to best fit our customers’ needs, including Multi Jet Fusion.

 

How have you seen the 3D printing industry evolve since you began?

It has majorly evolved since I began my career in 1990. I remember working with some of the early technologies and thinking this is junk! But so many of those technologies have since made tremendous advancements that have allowed the industry to grow at an amazing rate, and new technologies like Multi Jet Fusion have taken things to a whole new level with full 3D production. It used to be easy to keep track of everything that was going on, now there’s so much happening that just keeping up can be a full-time job.

 

Why did you decide to make such a big investment in Multi Jet Fusion with the installation of 12 HP 3D printing units?

When you’ve been in this industry as long as I have, you get to know a lot about both the pros and cons of 3D printing. The upsides are potentially limitless, but the main downside, the Achilles Heel that has kept 3D printing from becoming mainstream, has always been slow speed and high costs. HP has removed those shackles with Multi Jet Fusion and made 3D printing faster and more cost-effective than ever before, which opens up a whole new world of opportunities for us. When we first tested HP’s 3D printers a year ago we immediately saw how much they could achieve, and how far they could push the industry forward, so the only thing to do was go big.

 

 

What benefits do you see Multi Jet Fusion having over other types of manufacturing technology?

The speed alone is a tremendous benefit. To go from iterating multiple design cycles with prototypes to final production in one week is unprecedented. Being able to shorten the time-to-market can make a dramatic difference in the success of a product. And even if a product falls flat, the startup capital risk is so low that you can take your learnings and iterate a new, better product for little additional investment, especially important for smaller startups. 

 

The degree of manufacturing flexibility is one of the biggest benefits over conventional manufacturing technology, I strongly believe that once designers start to adopt the out-of-the-box thinking and boundless creativity that Multi Jet Fusion allows, we’ll see some amazing advancements in product design, innovation and performance. The companies that embrace this new mindset early will see a huge competitive advantage.

 

 

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How does being the first service bureau with the capacity for full-run 3D production with Multi Jet Fusion change your business now, and your outlook for the future?

Being the first to have this capacity has changed the way we think about 3D printing entirely. We’ve done small production jobs before, but the time and cost required by existing technologies made it impractical for anything beyond a few hundred parts. But with the installation of 12 Multi Jet Fusion units at our new facility, we now have the capacity to produce 600,000 parts in a single week. That’s the most significant leap that I’ve ever seen in 3D printing: going from prototyping and small batch production to full-run, large-scale 3D manufacturing. It’s drastically expanded the type and range of opportunities we can pursue, and it’s a microcosm for the way 3D printing is going to transform the entire global manufacturing industry.

 

Where do you see the 3D printing industry 5 years from now?

For decades, 3D printing has only been viewed as a viable manufacturing option by a small number of forward-thinking companies. But Multi Jet Fusion has turned that promise into a reality and opened the doors for the industry to grow at mass scale. I predict that in 5 years, 3D printing will already be a primary manufacturing process for at least 25% of companies in the world. Considering the size of the manufacturing industry, that is a mind-boggling amount of growth that will only continue to gain speed.

 

Ultimately, how do you think 3D printing’s transformation of the manufacturing industry will change the global business landscape, and change people’s lives on a personal level.

I think one of the greatest transformations that 3D printing will have on global business will be a push towards local manufacturing. Companies will be able to bring much of their manufacturing home, which will be positive in so many ways, especially in terms of the natural resources it requires to transport mass volumes of products overseas.

 

On a more personal level, kids these days are growing up with 3D printing as a household word, and getting introduced to the concept of computer-aided design at an early age. I think this will start a generational shift where today’s tech-savvy kids will be more inclined to make things rather than simply buy them.  Right now, consumer technology often means just going online to buy stuff. But in the future, I think people will have a less passive relationship with technology and will use it to make more things for themselves, customized to their own personal tastes.

 

I’ve custom-designed and printed many things for myself because they didn’t exist in the form that I needed them, from a cup holder for my ’68 Charger to a tool that cleans the leaves off my tile roof. Multi Jet Fusion gives you the power to create things quickly, at low cost, to the specifications of individual people, from my cup holder to a future with custom-printed shoes, cars, medical devices, household goods, and beyond. The possibilities are truly staggering.

 

Published: September 25, 2017

 

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A year ago, HP announced a quest with our agencies to transform the advertising industry. We challenged partners to significantly increase the number of women and U.S. minorities in top creative and strategic roles on our accounts.

Admittedly, an announcement is just words — and, over the years, there have been too many promises from all corners of the business world to diversify without enough action. In 2016, we stated that the time for just talk is over. Today, we are publishing the first proof of our commitment and, more importantly, sharing our learnings and path forward.

Overall, our five global agencies made significant progress. They increased the participation of women, and all but one noticeably increased the number of women in senior leadership roles. Today, 61 percent of people working on our account and 51 percent of people in senior leadership roles are female. This is 5 percent and 4 percent ahead, respectively, of the agencies’ self-imposed targets.

While advancements have been made, particularly in the second half of 2017, work remains in increasing representation among U.S. minorities. Three out of five agencies saw a positive, upward trend in minority representation. However, minority representation was still below target for 60 percent of HP’s global agencies. Overall, 8 percent of all employee growth across HP’s global agencies year-over-year were minorities.

Besides announcing our progress, HP is updating the challenge for 2018 by asking agency partners to define specific underrepresented groups by country and set clear objectives, measurements and plans to increase diverse talent on HP business. We’re also proud to be working with the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity on a new program that will enable underrepresented talent to network and get a foot in the door of the creativity community.

The numbers, however, are only part of the story. Sharing our learnings is the most important and lasting contribution of our journey. These findings include:

 

Industry transformation requires a holistic and systemic approach.

To transform the industry, we need to simultaneously increase representation and improve inclusion in three sectors: clients, agencies and production houses with a focus on directors. If these three sectors do not move at the same time, we will not be able to deliver the type of work that our diverse audiences require.

Clients analyze data, identify audiences and write the briefs. Agencies generate the creative work to emotionally connect with customers. Directors bring that work to life through their unique interpretation. The process is an alchemistic combination of deep analytics and creativity. Having a diverse mindset included throughout the process will ensure we are connecting with our customers more effectively.

 

The key to transformation is client activation.

Clients drive the advertising industry. They own the paycheck and set priorities. A group of committed clients could change the industry overnight.

But clients cannot require from the agencies something that they themselves are not doing. So clients need to work on improving representation on their marketing teams while creating the inclusive environment necessary for sustainable results.

At HP, we started by working on our marketing and communications teams first. Today 50 percent of HP’s most senior roles are held by women; 70 percent of our leaders have had meaningful experiences outside the U.S. and 30 percent are other underrepresented groups. We waited to have our house in order before we invited agencies to participate in the process.

In retrospect, I believe that we could have accelerated change by moving client and agencies together. Each one committing to the other. Jointly setting plans and meeting to improve representation and inclusion. 

 

Objectives and plans must be set by the agencies not by the client.

What gets measured gets done. No strategic initiative ever moved without objectives, specific plans of actions and measurement. Agencies need to have skin in this transformation game. They need to set and own their own numbers, develop their own plans and report back progress against these objectives.

Each of our agencies was able to set a stretch goal toward increasing the percentage of women and people of color working on our account. They were able to define their own plan of action. The results we reported are due to their commitment and hard work.

 

Accountability is everything.

Another key step in driving the numbers was the establishment of quarterly reviews.

In each quarterly meeting, we met agency CEOs individually to monitor progress. We discussed challenges and opportunities. They also shared the programs they created in order to increase diversity recruitment and inclusion. More than 15 of these programs were developed by the agencies.

The quarterly meeting was critical, as was CEO involvement. Both ensured that progress was being made. If what gets measured gets done, what gets reported becomes your bond.

 

Free the Bid was an amazing change catalyst for agencies and production houses.

Alma Ha’el‘s organization, Free the Bid, ensures that every RFP or “bid” for production includes at least one female director. In an industry driven by the momentum of the tried and true award-winning directors, 95 percent of which are men, this was an enormous step forward.

Additionally, their website now showcases more than 450 women directors, allowing agencies, production houses and clients the opportunity to review the reels of these outstanding women directors. The impact has been huge. Through Free the Bid, HP and our agencies have discovered extraordinary talent that has delivered impactful, business driving creative work.

HP will continue to fund Free the Bid’s efforts to give women director’s equal opportunities to bid on commercial jobs in the global advertising industry.

To improve numbers of underrepresented minorities we need to strengthen our resources for qualified diverse candidates. 

We did not make strong progress with U.S. minorities. We learned the hard way that neither external agencies nor our own internal recruitment teams had a meaningful pipeline of diverse candidates to fill our teams. It took several rounds of revisions to get to the right candidate profile. This was hard work and required commitment and focus from the top leaders. As we move forward, our companies will need to tap into different sources for talent identification like specialized agencies and universities with high diverse populations.

 

The time for action is now. 

Transforming our industry requires a holistic and systemic approach. Clients should drive.

But agencies and production houses must do their part.

Transformation is definitely possible, but it requires commitment, focus and bold action.

The time for talk is over. The time for action is now.