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Published: November 02, 2017

reinvent1.jpgToday marks our second anniversary as HP Inc. To celebrate this milestone, and our role as an innovation leader and founder of Silicon Valley, HP has invited thought leaders from organizations as diverse as IDEO, SoundHound Inc. and Wisdom VC to reimagine new possibilities in the way that people design and create, secure and protect, sustain and explore. The ‘Future Powered by Reinvention’ event will showcase technology shaping the future while reinventing the human experience today.  

 

With like-minded creative thinkers, influential visionaries, and business leaders, we’ll spark conversations about the rapid pace of the world around us and how we stay ahead of change to innovate, adapt, reinvent, and engineer experiences for a future that promises to look very different from today. To guide us into the future, we look to major socio-economic, demographic and technological trends occurring across the globe. These "megatrends" will have a sustained, transformative impact on the world in the years ahead and will influencer how we:   

 

Design and create with digital manufacturing. For the last 150 years or so, we’ve approached manufacturing in basically the same centralized way: design in one location, manufacture in a low-cost geography or in large automated facilities, then load goods on container ships and sent around the world. Not a scalable model in a world of rapid growth and urbanization.  

 

Digital manufacturing will drive profound changes in the business landscape. Digitally designed, digitally printed or manufactured on demand for industries including healthcare, consumer goods, automotive, and aerospace. No staging, no warehouses. HP and channel partners are in a unique position with regard to 3D print technology, which is at the heart of this manufacturing transformation. HP’s Multi Jet Fusion—alone among leading 3D contenders—has end-to-end digital capability and a growing range of printable materials is rapidly expanding across manufacturing applications. In five-years, we’ll see an increasing number of parts and objects manufactured in this way, at or near the point of use.   

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Secure and protect with cyber trust and security. Innovation is not the exclusive domain of the good guys. Security threats on the horizon are going to force a fundamental change in the way we approach development and design, driving a need for cyber security into places you’d never expect to need it. It’s at the cellular level, literally, when we are looking at hacked pacemakers and the ability to edit DNA.  

 

It’s our responsibility as technologists, and as humans, to focus on security and on how we can get to a new model for a safer future. Cyber-resiliency is a proactive security concept that, much like a healthy immune system provides a barrier against disease, would start with barriers to intrusion. Beyond that, the focus is on immediate detection and auto-response to isolate and neutralize the threat, extract it and come back to a known state. Cyber-resilient design is already fundamental to building the world’s most advanced security into HP’s current personal systems and printers.  

 

Sustain and explore with AI and machine learning. The notion of artificial intelligence is hardly new; our industry has been pursuing the potential of AI for almost 40 years. We're now at a point where the algorithms, compute capabilities, and exponentially increasing flow of data are turning the AI vision into reality. We’re at the tip of the iceberg with big data—collecting immense amounts of information, and using advanced analytics to sift through and find insights.  

 

Where AI will gain game-changing traction, however, is in the rise of machine learning. Machine learning helps AI to actually digest that data: identifying patterns that help us see meaning. Early AI applications are arriving in the form of bots, already in customer service engines, and collecting information to continuously refine their performance.    machine.jpg

 

In education, we’ll see commercial virtual reality, but also learning analytics and adaptive learning based on AI; in healthcare, we’ll see chatbots, virtual assistants, and bionics that use AI; and in aerospace, we’ll see exploring robots and space probes that will go where no man has been before.  

 

The ‘Future Powered by Reinvention’  

At our headquarters in Palo Alto, we’ll offer a unique tour of HP’s labs and bring together visionaries working on what's next. In addition to megatrends, a compelling experiential event will highlight HP breakthrough innovation from our labs focused on immersive experiences, 3D, and emerging compute including virtual and augmented reality, 3D printing and artificial intelligence.  

 

A panel, moderated by Fast Company, will spotlight the most important technologies influencing the human experience today—and which ones will be most important the next five to ten years. Panellists include David Webster, Head of Product and Technology at IDEO, Josh Kauffman, Founder of Wisdom VC, Rachel Sibley, Futurist, Kathleen McMahon, VP and GM, SoundHound and Chandrakant Patel, HP Senior Fellow and Chief Engineer.

 

More on today’s news and event can be found here.

 

    Corporate Innovation Tradeshows + Events
Published: November 15, 2017

 

HP_LGBTQ_Family1.jpg

 

When it comes to windows on the soul, eyes can’t compete with photos. After all, what reflects a person’s personal brand more authentically than images, especially those that we select to commit to paper. 

 

Think about your work space. Whose photos surround you? Family, friends, special moments in your life and career. But what if you felt you couldn’t share your most important people and connections? HP understands that some individuals simply don’t feel safe bringing their whole selves to work. Long a leader in the diversity and inclusion space, the company continues to work to change this experience for all people. In support of that effort, today, HP is launching Proud Portraits, the third spot in the Reinvent Mindsets campaign

 

Even though—perhaps because—HP has been at the forefront of building an inclusive workplace (the company’s earliest LGBTQ employee resource groups started more than 30 years ago) it understands the heartbreaking statistics: that 31% of closeted employees fear losing connections with coworkers, that 23% fear they might not be offered development or advancement opportunities, that nearly one in 10 LGBTQ employees have left a job because the environment was unwelcoming, and that more than one-third of LGBTQ employees had hid their personal lives at work.

 

But more importantly, HP knows the people behind those statistics. The employee who is participating in a phone-in LGBTQ focus group but is typing her answers because she’s uncomfortable with the possibility that she might be overheard. Or the trans new hire who is nervous about their bathroom options. HP is working hard to create an empathetic, inclusive environment where employees feel so supported that they are empowered to come out to their friends, family, and coworkers. 

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At HP, it’s all about creating a workplace that celebrates diversity and welcomes everyone in. In fact, the company is deep into a journey to reinvent the standard for diversity and inclusion with a mission to become THE employer of choice for underserved and underrepresented groups, including LGBTQ people. It’s about creating a welcoming environment for communities like the LGBTQ one—no matter where they are in their own personal journey of expression, the company is building a place where every person is encouraged to bring their whole self to work no matter what their preferred pronoun is. HP is building on the acclaimed Reinvent Mindsets campaign through Proud Portraits with the message that the company is hiring and talent is the only criteria; the new spot joins Let’s get in touch and Dads and Daughters.

 

Lisa Gunning, director of the spot, says, “I’m incredibly proud to be a part of this inspirational project. The LGBTQ community is made up of truly courageous people and it’s our hope that pieces like this will honor their courage, respect their pride in their families, and instill additional confidence in themselves. People trust the HP brand, it’s a household name. So, when HP demonstrates its commitment to all families, it catalyzes real change.”

 

Partnership with Out in Tech

Furthering our commitment to become the employer of choice among the LGBTQ community, HP has become an exclusive matching sponsor for Out in Tech’s Fall Fundraising Campaign, Technically Equal. Out in Tech’s mission is to unite the LGBTQ and tech communities by providing resources, support, and connections to new opportunities. Over the past year and a half, Out in Tech has built more than 40 websites for groups around the world to help support LGBTQ activists and groups. These sites are especially critical to connect individuals in countries where simply being yourself can put you at risk of imprisonment, and even death.HP_LGBTQ_Family3.jpg

 

 

Andrew Lowenthal, Executive Director, Out in Tech, says, “We love how HP works to Reinvent Mindsets by amplifying underrepresented voices in tech, and by joining forces we will leverage the expertise and passion within both of our communities.  A few years ago, five friends who were “out” and “in tech” went to a bar—now we’re nearly 15,000 members and growing.  We look forward to scaling our organization and impact even further in 2018 with HP’s generous support.”

 

HP will also be a champion sponsor of the Digital Corps event in San Francisco on Saturday, December 2, 2017. During the event, teams will build ten new websites, primarily for organizations that support LGBTQ youth.

 

Andrew explains, “On behalf of Out in Tech, I am thrilled to welcome HP as our exclusive matching funds sponsor for our Technically Equal campaign.  We look far and wide for companies and organizations that share our values and ideals of bolstering diversity in tech, and your corporate leadership came to us with a clear and unequivocal message: We support LGBTQ techies and we want IN!”

 

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We want to leverage the full power of HP's allied community. You can show your support in a few ways:

  • Donate directly to Out in Tech - HP will match all donations for Technically Equal
  • Share your own story, as an LGBTQ employee or ally at HP
  • Share your pride in HP as an inclusive workplace by sharing our spot and diversity & inclusion website

 

Helpful Links for Sharing

Published: November 01, 2017

poster_1_4X6_ENG_1.2.jpgPrint is powerful. Humans crave the tactile satisfaction of print and studies have shown that we attribute greater significance, understanding, credibility, and memorability to physical materials. The proof is in one illustrative statistic: data reveals that sales of e-books continue to fall, while sales of paperbound books rise.

 

HP has announced a major milestone catalysing this print renaissance. Today, it completed its acquisition of Samsung Electronics Co., Ltd.’s printer business.

 

This strategic investment positions HP to accelerate its disruption of the $55 billion A3 copier segment, with an expanded portfolio of next-generation multifunction printers that provide greater reliability and uptime, breakthrough economics, superior ease of use, and improved customer experience.

 

 

“Our teams are off to a strong start with a strategic plan to disrupt and capture A3 growth, grow managed print and document services, and drive the shift from transactional to contractual sales,” says Enrique Lores, President, Imaging & Printing Business, HP Inc.

 

World-class printing team

HP celebrated the welcome of Samsung employees; together they now make up the strongest, most innovative team in the industry in both A3 and A4 printing. The acquisition builds on the strengths of both companies, which share a proven culture of engineering innovation, R&D, and a commitment to the highest standards in quality print solutions.

 

Samsung brings a powerful IP portfolio, formidable employees, and a compelling A3 product line up, along with advanced expertise in laser printer technology, imaging electronics, mobile-first and cloud-first UX. They deliver a unique advantage with printer supplies and accessories to support unmatched future market growth opportunities. Samsung’s printing technologies and laser expertise will immediately broaden and strengthen HP’s A3 print portfolio, grow its leading A4 laser printing portfolio, add more than 6,500 printing patents to HP’s IP portfolio.   

 

These assets combine with HP’s leading position in print, unmatched sales channel, distribution depth, and operational excellence to provide both customers and partners with a portfolio that delivers unprecedented price, quality, and performance compared to service-intensive conventional copiers.

 

Lores says, “The entire HP team extends a very warm welcome to Samsung employees as they join our HP family. We are more committed than ever to Print and are investing in our portfolio, technology and talent to make our company even stronger.”

Published: October 20, 2017

A speculative wearable device ‘Data Vaporizer’A speculative wearable device ‘Data Vaporizer’In a guest lecture to students, faculty, and interested members of the public on October 26th at the California College of the Arts in San Francisco, HP Labs researcher Ji Won Jun will argue the case for “Design as a Speculative Inquiry.”HP Labs researcher Ji Won JunHP Labs researcher Ji Won Jun

“I’m going to be sharing some examples of my work to show how we can use design to think more creatively about the future and think about technology in a different way,” Jun says.

Too often, Jun believes, we view the likely impact of new technologies either in terms of solving problems with existing tools or through a fantastical lens more suited to science fiction.

“Speculative Design is about challenging our assumptions about why and how we should advance technology,” she notes. “Maybe our aim shouldn’t always be to do things faster or be more productive but instead be more about things like, say, protecting our privacy.”

One of Jun’s early projects – the Data Vaporizer – is a wearable device that does just that by offering protection from hackers. A more recent investigation for the Immersive Experiences Lab, Project Jetty, explores how we can foster stronger emotional connections between people without explicitly needing to make contact with each other.

“The point is to tweak the questions we ask ourselves and, in doing that, to provoke an alternative approach,” Jun suggests. “We’re creating prototype designs that we can share with people and, in measuring their responses to those designs, learn more about what might change as we get people to see technology in a new light.”

Jun’s lecture is part of the California College of the Arts’ annual open house for its MFA program in Design and will feature projects drawn from her own MFA studies at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California and her work in HP’s Immersive Experiences Lab, which she joined in early 2016.

Previously, Jun has presented her work at the 2017 Research Through Design Conference in Edinburgh, UK, and seen it featured in media including Fast Company, Vice magazine’s Creators project and ACM Interactions magazine. She also won the 2016 SXSW Interactive Innovation Award for Student Innovation and received an Art Center Graduate Honors Fellowship.

Jun’s lecture is on Thursday, October 26th at 7:30 PM in the Boardroom at the California College of the Arts (CCA) in San Francisco.

Published: October 20, 2017

HP Labs researcher Sarthak GhoshHP Labs researcher Sarthak Ghosh“In the future, people are going to spend a lot of time in virtual reality environments,” suggests HP Labs researcher Sarthak Ghosh. And they won’t just be using VR for entertainment. “VR will also become a key tool for employees working in fields as diverse as engineering, healthcare, media production, and space science,” Ghosh says.

That begs a question Ghosh first tackled while interning at HP Labs in 2016 as a masters student in Human Computer Interaction at Georgia Tech: how can we ensure that people working in VR environments keep track of what’s going on in the real world, of having a sense of passing time for example?

“If you are making a VR game, you don’t mind if your users are so engrossed in it that they lose track of time,” Ghosh observes. “But if you want people to use VR to do a job, they also need to attend meetings, write up reports, talk with colleagues and more.”

One solution would be to put a real time clock in the VR display that users see. But that takes up valuable visual real estate and taxes a human sense – vision – that is already being worked hard in such a visually immersive environment.

Instead, Ghosh decided to explore using haptic feedback – creating physical sensations with small motors – to offer clues about what’s going on outside the VR experience. Traditionally, haptic feedback has been deployed to make VR feel even more immersive. But could different types of haptic feedback also strengthen our feelings of connection to the outside world?

To find out, Ghosh built a series of five ‘haptic backpacks’ to be worn along with a VR headset. Inspired by HP’s own Omen VR Backpack, which makes it possible to create “untethered” VR experiences, each of these backpacks was augmented to deliver a different kind of physical nudge to users immersed in a virtual reality task. One backpack created the sensation of a shoulder tap at regular intervals to mark the passage of real world time, another buzzed at the shoulder, while a third buzzed the entire back. The fourth backpack created a “hugging” sensation and the final pack used small fans to blow air across the wearer’s neck.

Trials on colleagues in HP’s Immersive Experiences Lab quickly revealed that the hugging and blown air solutions didn’t give clear enough external signals. But the first three showed promise. Ghosh led efforts to test these other forms of haptic feedback on a larger group of participants as they undertook two different VR tasks.

“Perhaps our main finding was that people did notice the alerts they were getting and for the most part they were able to connect that with the real world, so it does seem possible to use your body’s surface area to create notifications about the real world,” says Ghosh.

The study also revealed a discrepancy between the intellectual calculations people make as they count buzzes or taps to measure time and their instinctual sense of how much time has passed. Many felt more inclined to believe their less reliable instincts over their more accurate counts, offering a useful window on the dominance of our instinctual sense of time in VR environments.

In addition, participants reported a strong inclination to believe that the physical sensations they were experiencing had a significance in the virtual world.Alex Thayer, Chief Experience Architect for the Immersive Experiences LabAlex Thayer, Chief Experience Architect for the Immersive Experiences Lab

“If we can get a better handle on all of these things, it could help make for a better VR experience itself as well as letting us send clearer signals from the outside,” notes Alex Thayer, Chief Experience Architect for the Immersive Experiences Lab. 

On the issue of external notifications, the study suggested multiple areas for further analysis, such as the best patterns to use for signaling and the degree to which priming participants with information about what to expect can impact outcomes.

After completing his initial research, Ghosh returned to Georgia Tech to finish his degree. The work on his thesis with adviser Gregory Abowd was inspired by the HP Labs study. On graduation, Ghosh was hired into HP Labs as a full time researcher in the Immersive Experiences Lab so he could continue his explorations.

“One of our next steps is to ask how we can apply what we’re learning in these studies to future iterations of VR interaction and design,” Ghosh says.

That will help HP’s Immersive Experiences Lab further its goal of helping people achieve “supernatural productivity” – productivity far beyond what’s currently possible.

“We see VR as one of the technologies most likely to both disrupt and enhance how professionals do their work in the next five or ten years,” adds Thayer. “Research like this helps us anticipate that moment by enriching our understanding of what it will take to have VR be a major part of our work lives.”

Addendum - The haptic backpack project was a collaborative effort with other members of the Immersive Experiences Lab, including Hiro Horii, Kevin Smathers, and Mithra Vankipuram.