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Published: August 25, 2017

Bob Jones, Executive VP of global sales, marketing and services, Siemens PLM SoftwareBob Jones, Executive VP of global sales, marketing and services, Siemens PLM Software

Bob Jones, Executive VP of global sales, marketing and services for Siemens PLM Software, was among the leaders who participated in an industry panel during yesterday’s announcement of HP’s new strategic alliance with Deloitte, the worldwide leader in professional services and digital supply chain transformations, aimed at accelerating the digital transformation of the $12 trillion global manufacturing industry with HP’s groundbreaking 3D printing solutions.

We caught up with Bob to learn how Siemens is transforming the global manufacturing industry with digitalization and additive manufacturing.

 

Q. What is Siemens’ perspective on the analog-to-digital transformation that is upon us?

A. It’s important to understand the distinction between “digitization” and “digitalization.” It’s the difference between taking an analog process and using digital technologies to mimic it for efficiency gains – and leveraging digital data to fundamentally transform processes, leading to more opportunities for disruptive innovation and new business models.

Digitalization is changing our daily lives, transforming entire industries and revolutionizing the global economy. The products we use every day, how they are produced and the enterprises that produce them will be dramatically changed by digitalization.

Today's market-leading companies are already seizing opportunities created by digitalization to accelerate innovation, employ new business models, and respond to dynamic customer and market demands with greater speed, agility, quality and at less cost.

 

Q. What does this transformation mean for companies that design and create?

A. Every company is on its own unique digital journey and is looking to digitalization to create differentiating value for its customers. Companies of all sizes are transforming into digital enterprises that produce smart, individualized products augmented by a digital communication language enabling innovative data-driven services and support.

Digital enterprises are thriving by digitally linking their product development and production operations to customers and global supply chain networks, which is changing the way ideas come to life and the way products and factories are utilized. 

Firewire Surfboards, a small-sized surfboard manufacturer in Carlsbad, Calif., is a customer that we've helped to innovate the next generation of surfboards. Firewire is using the power of digitalization to revolutionize the surfing experience by constructing performance-engineered and eco-friendly surfboards individually tuned to each customer’s surfing style and needs.

Newport News Shipbuilding is another example of how our customers are undergoing a digital transformation. Newport News is leveraging 3D model data as the foundation for a “drawingless ship” that can be built and maintained through electronic work instructions on tablets.

 

Q. What role does additive manufacturing play in Siemens’ vision for the future? 

A. Additive manufacturing is a disruptive force that is reshaping the way digital enterprises conceive, design, produce, distribute and service products. With additive manufacturing, companies are reimagining products that perform better, have more strength, less weight and are individualized to a customer’s personal needs – and are realizing these products on-demand and without the need for long lead-time and expensive tooling.

Siemens uses additive manufacturing for industrial production and we provide market-leading software and production automation solutions for our customers. Siemens manufacturing divisions are already making breakthroughs in the areas of designing components with performance-enhancing complex internal geometry that can only be 3D printed, dramatically reducing lead-time (for example, Siemens gas turbine burner), 3D printing spare parts on-demand, and the streamlining of supply chains.

However, while additive manufacturing is proving to create business value, gaps in the value chain must be closed in order to scale-up its use for mass industrial production. Costly data conversions between software applications, uncontrolled data and process steps, scarce expertise, and 3D printers stranded on islands are just some of the gaps that must be addressed in order to advance additive manufacturing into mainstream product development, production and business operations. 

Our vision at Siemens is to industrialize additive manufacturing by enabling control of the complete process via a connected and continuous digital thread from concept to finished 3D printed part and extending into field use. We’re delivering on our vision by offering integrated additive manufacturing software solutions for all primary design, engineering, manufacturing planning and production functions – an end-to-end product development system underpinned by digital twins, production automation hardware, expertise, and a vibrant ecosystem of partners and customers.

 

Q. How does the collaboration between Siemens and HP play a role in Siemens’ vision for additive manufacturing?

A. We recognize that Siemens cannot industrialize additive manufacturing and transform the global manufacturing industry alone. Siemens and HP have a long-standing relationship and we share a vision for helping our customers compete by taking a comprehensive and integrated end-to-end approach to industrialize additive manufacturing - and to transform products and how they are made.

We believe HP 3D printing technology with Multi Jet Fusion and voxel-level control need modern digital design and production automation tools to unlock the full power of the technology – and scale-up additive manufacturing for the industrial mass production – and we look forward to continuing to work with HP to realize our shared vision.

 

About Bob Jones

Robert Jones is executive vice president of global sales, marketing and services for Siemens PLM Software, a business unit of the Siemens Digital Factory Division. He and his team are responsible for the company’s sales, marketing and service delivery on a global basis. He works in partnership with Siemens PLM Software’s zone sales leaders to aggressively target geographic, industry and strategic corporate opportunities. Prior to his current position Jones was senior vice president and managing director of the Americas with responsibility for sales, sales support and services delivery in North and South America.

Before assuming his Americas role, Jones led sales, sales support and services delivery for Siemens PLM Software’s U.S. organization and prior to that, was responsible for the company’s global General Motors account. Throughout his career with Siemens, Jones has held a number of leadership roles in both sales and marketing. His responsibilities have included direct and indirect sales and marketing strategies for the PLM portfolio to the automotive OEM and supplier industry.

Before joining Siemens PLM Software as an account executive, Robert began his career in product development at Johnson Controls, Automotive Systems Group (JCI/ASG). During his tenure at JCI/ASG, he was a chief engineer responsible for mechanism programs to OEMs in America, Asia and Europe.

Jones has a master's degree in Mechanical Engineering from Virginia Polytechnic University and a bachelor's degree in Mechanical Engineering from Western Michigan University.

Robert and his wife, Holly, reside in Northville, Michigan, with their four sons.

    3D Printing Leadership
Published: November 29, 2017

FitStation_029.jpg

 

Today, FitStation powered by HP announced that Brooks Running Company, which designs and markets high-performance running shoes, apparel and accessories in more than 60 countries worldwide, is partnering with FitStation to deliver the first-ever fully custom running shoes. FitStation, a new platform that delivers custom-fitted and individualized footwear through innovative 3D scanning, dynamic gait analysis, and manufacturing technologies, has piloted the innovative biometric-based running shoe development platform at 11 premium retail locations across the US, to rave reviews.

Brooks is committed to providing the experience each runner wants. The ability to deliver a personalized shoe based on an individual’s unique biomechanics is an important offering for the runner who is interested in tip-of-the-spear technology and a totally tuned ride,” said Brooks CEO Jim Weber. “As part of our focus on reinventing performance running, we will continue to push the envelope to bring runners new innovations that help them tailor their unique running experience.”FitStation_003.jpg

 

FitStation combined with Brooks’ deep understanding of runners’ unique biomechanics and commitment to providing personalized experiences that enhance the run for the individual, brings Run Signature to the next level and delivers the most personalized individualized running footwear, all based on the customer’s personal data. This personalized footwear will be available via special order through select retail partners beginning June 2018.   

The Brooks announcement comes on the heels of another key partnership; in October, HP joined partner Steitz Secura at A+A in Germany. A safety shoe specialist, Steitz Secura is using FitStation to aid in its focus on comfort, preventative health and safety.

The digital foot scanning platform allows customers to create a profile, choose to receive personalized off-the-shelf insole and shoe recommendations, fully customized 3D printed insoles, or receive their own pair of truly individualized custom footwear. This unique solution analyzes each foot using a combination of 3D scanning and pressure plate technology to deliver a complete dynamic gait analysis for the individual. FitStation analyzes the data and produces details for custom shoes with polyurethane injected midsoles, that vary in density based on the customer's precise needs. Then, the products can be produced locally for unbelievable ease and speed.FitStation_006.jpg

 

Reinventing how the world designs, manufactures, and sells

FitStation is HP’s next step in the company’s journey to reinvent how the world designs and manufactures with commercial 3D technologies. It’s also a significant leap in reimaging what the retail experience of the future will look like. While brick and mortar stores have faced challenges as online shopping grows in popularity, there is still a deep desire for in-store experiences. But the store of the future needs to engage customers in fresh, tailored ways. Offerings that deliver individualized ‘you-get-me’ options will win the retail wars. "FitStation by HP is changing what personalization means—from the in-store experience to the final product. In collaboration with Brooks and Superfeet, we are delivering truly made-to-measure footwear with a lot size of one,” said Ed Ponomarev, general manager of FitStation and business development HP Inc. “Digitalization of biometric data opens an opportunity to ultimate individualization with the speed and cost efficiency of mass production. HP brings deep experience in computing, scanning and technology integration at scale to deliver a revolutionary digital manufacturing platform, creating individualized products that are available to anyone—from casual runners to elite athletes.”

“Without question, the system is on the cutting edge within our industry, and the level of engagement with our consumers is remarkable. FitStation has become an integral component now in our standard shoe-fitting process with our business. In addition to a cool experience, the system allows us the opportunity to sell the consumer a very personalized ME3D insole while never having to stock an inventory item...positively brilliant,” said Adam White of Running Central.FitStation_015.jpg

 

FitStation uses HP Multi Jet Fusion printing technology to manufacture the world’s first 3D printed insoles made using 3D scanning and dynamic gait analysis to create a one-of-a-kind digital profile of each foot. Superfeet, the leader in innovative, over-the-counter insoles, is piloting the platform in select stores across the 4,000 retail locations where they have a presence.

"For 40 years, we have set the standard for shape and fit. Until today, the technology to deliver a 3D printed insole that meets Superfeet’s exacting standards didn’t exist,” said Eric Hayes, Chief Marketing Officer at Superfeet. “Our new solution allows us to create the most individualized shape and fit on the planet.” 

"FitStation is a truly disruptive platform that will improves people’s lives and change the way people purchase footwear and shoe insoles,” said Louis Kim, Global Head of Immersive Computing, Personal Systems, HP Inc. “We are reinventing the footwear shopping experience, bringing a level of customization and personalization never before seen. We are stitching HP’s capabilities in 3D scanning and 3D printing to bring this Blended Reality vision to life and are working with leading partners within the footwear industry to develop this revolutionary platform.”

Learn more about FitStation powered by HP.

Published: November 27, 2017

Multi-jet-fusion printed part on the left and a high resolution scan of the indicated portion of it on the right  showing the micro surface structure used  for authentication.Multi-jet-fusion printed part on the left and a high resolution scan of the indicated portion of it on the right showing the micro surface structure used for authentication.An HP Labs investigation into accurately identifying and authenticating 3D-printed objects is helping enable a future where parts for high performance machines like jet engines are routinely printed to order. It may also aid the development of new systems for tracking physical objects of any kind on a massive scale.

HP Labs Distinguished Technologist Stephen PollardHP Labs Distinguished Technologist Stephen Pollard

 “To use a 3D printed part in a machine like an aero-engine, you need to be able to confidently identify and track that part after it has been printed from a known and trusted printer,” observes Bristol, UK-based researcher Stephen Pollard.

One way to do that would be to add a unique identifier like a bar code to each printed item. But Pollard and his colleagues in HP’s Print Adjacencies and 3D Lab wanted to come up with an approach that added no processing or materials cost to the 3D printing process and that would also have applicability for 3D objects created via more conventional methods.

Their solution: a low cost, three-stage, automated identification and authentication system that doesn’t require a printed object to be readied for authentication in any way.  

It works by first designating a small area of the object to be tracked as the location of a “virtual forensic mark.” This need only be a centimeter or so square and can easily be pre-assigned in the digital version of the 3D object before it is printed.   

Once the item is printed, it is robotically scanned so that the location of the virtual forensic mark can be identified. Finally, a second, very high resolution scanner takes a measurement of that small area. It’s so accurate – detecting surface differences of just two thousandths of a millimeter - that it can establish a unique digital signature for every printed version of an identical 3D object.

With this identifying information on file, the object can be scanned again whenever a confirmation of the object’s specific identity is needed.

“It’s like a fingerprint scanner for physical objects,” says Pollard.

The team has already created prototypes for most of the elements in their system. They next plan to miniaturize and integrate them together into a single prototype device, creating a tool that does the work of instruments that currently cost tens of thousands of dollars for under $100 per machine.HP Labs research engineer Faisal AzharHP Labs research engineer Faisal Azhar

One major challenge will be to place each of these elements together in way that allows the process to be fully automated, adds Labs researcher Faisal Azhar.  

“The other hard problem we face is extracting reliable and repeatable signatures of the 3D parts,” Azhar says. “We are already able to make incredibly accurate scans but those scans need to be reliably repeatable to be confident that the object we identify right after printing is the same object we later want to place, for example, in a machine.”

At present, the system is optimized to scan the surface of objects created by HP 3D printers. But the Labs identification and authentication team plans to expand its capabilities to include objects made from a more diverse array of materials.

More broadly, they are also looking to measure properties of 3D objects beyond their shape, and devise methods for further enhancing production line integration and automated machine interactions with them. “This “forensic” level of authentication and identification will really come into its own when 3D printing moves from prototyping and into production, and manufacturers are printing millions and even billions of copies of any one part,” says Pollard.

Published: November 15, 2017

 

HP_LGBTQ_Family1.jpg

 

When it comes to windows on the soul, eyes can’t compete with photos. After all, what reflects a person’s personal brand more authentically than images, especially those that we select to commit to paper. 

 

Think about your work space. Whose photos surround you? Family, friends, special moments in your life and career. But what if you felt you couldn’t share your most important people and connections? HP understands that some individuals simply don’t feel safe bringing their whole selves to work. Long a leader in the diversity and inclusion space, the company continues to work to change this experience for all people. In support of that effort, today, HP is launching Proud Portraits, the third spot in the Reinvent Mindsets campaign

 

Even though—perhaps because—HP has been at the forefront of building an inclusive workplace (the company’s earliest LGBTQ employee resource groups started more than 30 years ago) it understands the heartbreaking statistics: that 31% of closeted employees fear losing connections with coworkers, that 23% fear they might not be offered development or advancement opportunities, that nearly one in 10 LGBTQ employees have left a job because the environment was unwelcoming, and that more than one-third of LGBTQ employees had hid their personal lives at work.

 

But more importantly, HP knows the people behind those statistics. The employee who is participating in a phone-in LGBTQ focus group but is typing her answers because she’s uncomfortable with the possibility that she might be overheard. Or the trans new hire who is nervous about their bathroom options. HP is working hard to create an empathetic, inclusive environment where employees feel so supported that they are empowered to come out to their friends, family, and coworkers. 

 HP_LGBTQ_Family2.jpg

At HP, it’s all about creating a workplace that celebrates diversity and welcomes everyone in. In fact, the company is deep into a journey to reinvent the standard for diversity and inclusion with a mission to become THE employer of choice for underserved and underrepresented groups, including LGBTQ people. It’s about creating a welcoming environment for communities like the LGBTQ one—no matter where they are in their own personal journey of expression, the company is building a place where every person is encouraged to bring their whole self to work no matter what their preferred pronoun is. HP is building on the acclaimed Reinvent Mindsets campaign through Proud Portraits with the message that the company is hiring and talent is the only criteria; the new spot joins Let’s get in touch and Dads and Daughters.

 

Lisa Gunning, director of the spot, says, “I’m incredibly proud to be a part of this inspirational project. The LGBTQ community is made up of truly courageous people and it’s our hope that pieces like this will honor their courage, respect their pride in their families, and instill additional confidence in themselves. People trust the HP brand, it’s a household name. So, when HP demonstrates its commitment to all families, it catalyzes real change.”

 

Partnership with Out in Tech

Furthering our commitment to become the employer of choice among the LGBTQ community, HP has become an exclusive matching sponsor for Out in Tech’s Fall Fundraising Campaign, Technically Equal. Out in Tech’s mission is to unite the LGBTQ and tech communities by providing resources, support, and connections to new opportunities. Over the past year and a half, Out in Tech has built more than 40 websites for groups around the world to help support LGBTQ activists and groups. These sites are especially critical to connect individuals in countries where simply being yourself can put you at risk of imprisonment, and even death.HP_LGBTQ_Family3.jpg

 

 

Andrew Lowenthal, Executive Director, Out in Tech, says, “We love how HP works to Reinvent Mindsets by amplifying underrepresented voices in tech, and by joining forces we will leverage the expertise and passion within both of our communities.  A few years ago, five friends who were “out” and “in tech” went to a bar—now we’re nearly 15,000 members and growing.  We look forward to scaling our organization and impact even further in 2018 with HP’s generous support.”

 

HP will also be a champion sponsor of the Digital Corps event in San Francisco on Saturday, December 2, 2017. During the event, teams will build ten new websites, primarily for organizations that support LGBTQ youth.

 

Andrew explains, “On behalf of Out in Tech, I am thrilled to welcome HP as our exclusive matching funds sponsor for our Technically Equal campaign.  We look far and wide for companies and organizations that share our values and ideals of bolstering diversity in tech, and your corporate leadership came to us with a clear and unequivocal message: We support LGBTQ techies and we want IN!”

 

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We want to leverage the full power of HP's allied community. You can show your support in a few ways:

  • Donate directly to Out in Tech - HP will match all donations for Technically Equal
  • Share your own story, as an LGBTQ employee or ally at HP
  • Share your pride in HP as an inclusive workplace by sharing our spot and diversity & inclusion website

 

Helpful Links for Sharing

Published: November 14, 2017

Cheryl MacleodCheryl Macleod

One of the biggest factors in HP’s rise as the world’s innovation leader in 3D printing, the disruptive technology set to transform the $12 trillion global manufacturing industry, is a long heritage of printing leadership and reinvention that goes back decades.

The building blocks of HP’s groundbreaking Multi Jet Fusion 3D printing technology are actually rooted in one of the company’s most historic innovations, thermal Inkjet technology, which remains the gold standard for home and office printers some 30 years later.

For a good example of how HP’s past continues to inform its future, look no further than the 23-year company veteran who was recently appointed to lead one of its most cutting-edge organizations: Cheryl Macleod, HP’s new Global Head of 3D Fusion Science.

 

One thing that links your interests in science, cooking, and travel is a love of learning. What are some of your earliest memories of learning?

My earliest memories of learning weren’t in school, they were at home with my older brother, trying to keep up with him. I’ve always had a bit of a competitive streak. In first grade when he came home and said, “I know how to read,” I went straight to my mom and said “I want to read, too!” I also remember my mom taking us out on nature walks and looking under every rock and stump to see what creatures might be living there. That really taught me the value of experiential learning.

What drew you to science as a career?

I actually wanted to be a musician, but didn’t think it would pay the bills. I was really good in math and science so I got my bachelor’s degree in biomedical engineering. But then I decided to change my focus to chemical engineering and went to UC Berkeley with the intent of getting a masters in that area, but then I switched again to a PhD program so I could spend more time doing hands-on research instead of sitting in a library. It’s that love of experiential learning again.

How did that bring you to HP?

The research in my PhD program was in the area of surface and colloid chemistry, which involves studying the relationships between properties in materials that are too small to be seen with the naked eye. It was that fascination with extremely small things that brought me to HP’s Inkjet business. The technology behind it is essentially teeny tiny drops shooting out of really complex but small devices to make incredible images on paper. I was hooked.

You’ve been here for 23 years in a multitude of R&D roles. How have you seen the company evolve?

When I joined the company, Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard had both recently retired but they were still an incredibly strong presence, and most of the leaders in the company had worked with them directly. But then in subsequent years, I think the company began to move towards focusing more on short-term results than the big innovation picture that Bill and Dave founded it on. In the last two years it’s been really exciting to see our entire leadership team take the company back to its roots and reinfuse it with big, long-term commitments to innovation, talent, and disruptive technologies like 3D printing.

Who have your greatest mentors been?

There have been many, but the one who sticks out most was my first director at HP. I remember during my second week here I was invited to have a one-on-one with him. I was so struck that in this lab of literally hundreds of people, the director would take the time to meet with every new employee just to get to know them. That’s something I’ve always carried with me. Whenever I join a new organization I try to meet with every single person within the first few months. So many people have told me, “That’s never happened in my career before.” But for me it’s normal because it happened to me in my second week at HP.

Your new job is leading the Fusion Science organization for HP’s 3D printing business. What exactly does that team do, and what are your goals for it?

We focus on developing the deep science behind the materials that drive our business: the powders and agents that are used in 3D printing with Multi Jet Fusion. We take a very rigorous scientific and engineering approach to understanding and developing both our HP-branded agents and the ones developed by our materials partners. We lead the materials certification process and work directly with our partners to develop their materials and bring them to market. Our biggest long-term goal is to expand the breadth and applications of 3D printing materials to rival the amount used in traditional manufacturing, which is a number in the thousands. We’ve got our work cut out for us.

One of your biggest passions is cooking. What lessons from cooking have you applied to your work?

Well, cooking is all about chemistry: taking things through mixing, processing, and heating to create completely different things. In Indian cooking, the list of ingredients for each dish can sound nearly identical: the same basic spices, the same kinds of vegetables and rice. But the nuance is in the process you use for each one: do you add a certain spice first or last? Is it whole our ground? How long should it simmer? The process has a huge impact on how the dish comes out. So at work I make sure our engineers are very rigorous in documenting their processes in how they fuse things together. It really makes all the difference.

How has being a woman informed your career in a traditionally male-dominated field?

Before I came to HP, I interviewed with a few other companies. Each time, lunchtime would roll around and they’d trot out “The Woman” who worked there to have lunch with me to show me how good their diversity was, which of course wasn’t very convincing at all. Then I came to HP. I didn’t talk to a single woman during my interviews, but as I was walking down the hallways there were women working everywhere: in the labs, on the engineering teams, on the product teams. Nobody went out of their way to try and convince me that HP was a diverse company because I could see it with my own two eyes. As much as anything, that’s what brought me here.

Published: November 09, 2017

 

HP Jet Fusion 32 4200 printersHP Jet Fusion 32 4200 printers

3D printing is one of the most disruptive technologies of our time, spearheading a new 4th Industrial Revolution that will radically change the way we conceive, design, produce, distribute, and consume pretty much everything.

But until now, 3D printing hasn’t been a viable means of large-scale industrial manufacturing (think big factories) because of prohibitively expensive production costs and limited technology. In order to realize HP’s vision of digitally transforming the $12 trillion global manufacturing industry, the economics of 3D printing needed to be completely rewritten.

Today, HP announced that it has smashed that economic barrier and paved the way for cost-effective, industrial-scale 3D manufacturing with the new Jet Fusion 3D 4210 Printing Solution.

The new solution increases production volume for HP Jet Fusion 3D printers by enabling continuous operation, greater overall system efficiency, and the ability handle larger quantities of 3D printing materials, while significantly lowering production costs with reduced pricing on HP’s 3D materials and shared service contracts.

When put together with HP’s industry-leading Multi Jet Fusion technology, those enhancements double the existing “break-even point” at which 3D printing remains cost-effective to an unprecedented 110,000 parts, and drastically reduces the cost-per-part, up to 65% less than other methods.

“The new 3D 4210 Printing Solution enables our customers to mass-produce parts using HP’s Multi Jet Fusion technology for significantly less than other processes, and fully benefit from the economies of scale,” said Ramon Pastor, General Manager of Multi Jet Fusion for HP’s 3D printing business. “HP’s Jet Fusion 3D systems have now reached a technological and economic inflection point that combines the speed, quality, and scalability needed to accelerate manufacturing’s digital industrial revolution.”

Today, HP also announced the further expansion of its industry-first Open Materials Platform, a collaborative development and distribution model where HP and its growing ecosystem of 3D partners work together to drive materials innovation, reduce costs, and create new applications and markets for Multi Jet Fusion technology. There are already over 50 leading companies actively engaged on the platform.Materials companies can use HP’s Materials Development Kit to quickly test compatibility with Jet Fusion printers.Materials companies can use HP’s Materials Development Kit to quickly test compatibility with Jet Fusion printers.

 

It was announced that leading chemical companies Dressler Group and Lubrizol have joined the growing HP 3D partner ecosystem, and also that three new three new engineering-grade 3D printing materials are coming to the open platform: PA 11, PA 12 Glass Beads, and Polypropylene.

The new materials raise the bar on production quality, strength, versatility, and flexibility, but only one of them is going to space (for now).

The new HP 3D High Reusability PA 12 Glass Beads, an innovative new nylon material filled with tiny glass beads, was used to make one of the most complex parts in a specially-designed HP ENVY Zero-Gravity printer developed with NASA that’s being sent to the International Space Station this February. The printer’s output tray needed to be particularly lightweight, watertight, and durable for its journey to space, and 3D printing with PA 12 Glass Beads provided the perfect solution.

HP continues to unlock the economics and technology of 3D manufacturing, with a deeply-engaged network of partners committed to accelerating the digital industrial revolution.

Says Corey Weber, co-founder of leading printing service bureau Forecast 3D, “It has never been more clear to us that HP’s Multi Jet Fusion represents the future of digital manufacturing.”