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Published: May 12, 2017

As I am sure that some of you have read, on May 11, a Swiss cyber-security firm, Modzero AG, released a whitepaper highlighting that a keylogger issue – which in this case, is debug code – that is present in Conexant audio drivers on select HP computers.

At HP, customer security is our top priority, so I wanted to give an update on the issue, what we have done, and our best advice to customers.

First and most importantly, there is a fix for our commercial PCs available on HP.com as of today, May 12, with fixes for all consumer PCs scheduled to be available on May 13. In addition, HP has not had, nor will it have, any access to user data as a result of this issue.

When HP learned about this earlier this month, our Cyber Security team immediately investigated the issue, found the root cause and worked on a fix. In addition to being available on HP.com, we are also in the process of getting it published through Microsoft’s Windows Update Service. This is so customers – especially those with PCs not managed by an IT organization – will get the update automatically. For customers whose PCs are managed by their internal IT team, the update is available for deployment through their standard sets of tools.

As Modzero’s report states, there was a keylogger capability in the Conexant HD audio driver package that is preinstalled on some HP PCs. This capability was created by Conexant during the development process to help debug an audio issue. Adding debug code is a normal part of the development process and such code is supposed to be removed and never included in a commercially available product. Unfortunately, in this case, Conexant did not remove the code. We certainly never intended to include this code in shipped products.

The debug code stores keystrokes in a log file that it creates to help developers diagnose an issue. This code is stored in a file locally on the PC, and then it is cleared out each time the user logs off and whenever the PC is rebooted.

Some media coverage suggested that the log files are sent back to HP. These articles are inaccurate – such information is never sent back to HP. Again, HP never intended to include this functionality in a shipped product used by customers. What is most important to know is that there is an immediate commercial fix available with all consumer fixes available by May 13.

This issue effects certain commercial notebooks and desktop systems manufactured since 2015. In addition, a select set of our consumer systems are effected. For more information on the exact systems that need an update to the audio driver, check out our security advisory.

Our best advice to customers is to install the updated driver package. If you are a consumer customer or a business without a dedicated IT team, we recommend using Window Update to keep your PC updated automatically. For customers with a dedicated IT organization, download the Softpak from HP.com and distribute the updated driver package as you would any other update. Given the nature of this issue, our advice is to deploy this update as quickly as possible.

While HP didn’t create the driver, our job is to keep the customer safe even when the issue is with third-party code. We have learned from this situation and will work to with our partners to further verify the debug code is removed from their software before it goes final. That said, we will also continue to work with the security community to learn about these issues if they do come up, and then work to make sure we can get high quality fixes out to customers as quickly as possible, just as we are doing in this case.

For more information, please read the security advisory available here.

 

    Corporate Desktop Computing
Published: September 25, 2017

 

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A year ago, HP announced a quest with our agencies to transform the advertising industry. We challenged partners to significantly increase the number of women and U.S. minorities in top creative and strategic roles on our accounts.

Admittedly, an announcement is just words — and, over the years, there have been too many promises from all corners of the business world to diversify without enough action. In 2016, we stated that the time for just talk is over. Today, we are publishing the first proof of our commitment and, more importantly, sharing our learnings and path forward.

Overall, our five global agencies made significant progress. They increased the participation of women, and all but one noticeably increased the number of women in senior leadership roles. Today, 61 percent of people working on our account and 51 percent of people in senior leadership roles are female. This is 5 percent and 4 percent ahead, respectively, of the agencies’ self-imposed targets.

While advancements have been made, particularly in the second half of 2017, work remains in increasing representation among U.S. minorities. Three out of five agencies saw a positive, upward trend in minority representation. However, minority representation was still below target for 60 percent of HP’s global agencies. Overall, 8 percent of all employee growth across HP’s global agencies year-over-year were minorities.

Besides announcing our progress, HP is updating the challenge for 2018 by asking agency partners to define specific underrepresented groups by country and set clear objectives, measurements and plans to increase diverse talent on HP business. We’re also proud to be working with the Cannes Lions International Festival of Creativity on a new program that will enable underrepresented talent to network and get a foot in the door of the creativity community.

The numbers, however, are only part of the story. Sharing our learnings is the most important and lasting contribution of our journey. These findings include:

 

Industry transformation requires a holistic and systemic approach.

To transform the industry, we need to simultaneously increase representation and improve inclusion in three sectors: clients, agencies and production houses with a focus on directors. If these three sectors do not move at the same time, we will not be able to deliver the type of work that our diverse audiences require.

Clients analyze data, identify audiences and write the briefs. Agencies generate the creative work to emotionally connect with customers. Directors bring that work to life through their unique interpretation. The process is an alchemistic combination of deep analytics and creativity. Having a diverse mindset included throughout the process will ensure we are connecting with our customers more effectively.

 

The key to transformation is client activation.

Clients drive the advertising industry. They own the paycheck and set priorities. A group of committed clients could change the industry overnight.

But clients cannot require from the agencies something that they themselves are not doing. So clients need to work on improving representation on their marketing teams while creating the inclusive environment necessary for sustainable results.

At HP, we started by working on our marketing and communications teams first. Today 50 percent of HP’s most senior roles are held by women; 70 percent of our leaders have had meaningful experiences outside the U.S. and 30 percent are other underrepresented groups. We waited to have our house in order before we invited agencies to participate in the process.

In retrospect, I believe that we could have accelerated change by moving client and agencies together. Each one committing to the other. Jointly setting plans and meeting to improve representation and inclusion. 

 

Objectives and plans must be set by the agencies not by the client.

What gets measured gets done. No strategic initiative ever moved without objectives, specific plans of actions and measurement. Agencies need to have skin in this transformation game. They need to set and own their own numbers, develop their own plans and report back progress against these objectives.

Each of our agencies was able to set a stretch goal toward increasing the percentage of women and people of color working on our account. They were able to define their own plan of action. The results we reported are due to their commitment and hard work.

 

Accountability is everything.

Another key step in driving the numbers was the establishment of quarterly reviews.

In each quarterly meeting, we met agency CEOs individually to monitor progress. We discussed challenges and opportunities. They also shared the programs they created in order to increase diversity recruitment and inclusion. More than 15 of these programs were developed by the agencies.

The quarterly meeting was critical, as was CEO involvement. Both ensured that progress was being made. If what gets measured gets done, what gets reported becomes your bond.

 

Free the Bid was an amazing change catalyst for agencies and production houses.

Alma Ha’el‘s organization, Free the Bid, ensures that every RFP or “bid” for production includes at least one female director. In an industry driven by the momentum of the tried and true award-winning directors, 95 percent of which are men, this was an enormous step forward.

Additionally, their website now showcases more than 450 women directors, allowing agencies, production houses and clients the opportunity to review the reels of these outstanding women directors. The impact has been huge. Through Free the Bid, HP and our agencies have discovered extraordinary talent that has delivered impactful, business driving creative work.

HP will continue to fund Free the Bid’s efforts to give women director’s equal opportunities to bid on commercial jobs in the global advertising industry.

To improve numbers of underrepresented minorities we need to strengthen our resources for qualified diverse candidates. 

We did not make strong progress with U.S. minorities. We learned the hard way that neither external agencies nor our own internal recruitment teams had a meaningful pipeline of diverse candidates to fill our teams. It took several rounds of revisions to get to the right candidate profile. This was hard work and required commitment and focus from the top leaders. As we move forward, our companies will need to tap into different sources for talent identification like specialized agencies and universities with high diverse populations.

 

The time for action is now. 

Transforming our industry requires a holistic and systemic approach. Clients should drive.

But agencies and production houses must do their part.

Transformation is definitely possible, but it requires commitment, focus and bold action.

The time for talk is over. The time for action is now.

 

Published: September 10, 2017

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HP’s Security Advisory Board enlists a trio of security experts to help it triumph in a malicious new world.

 

For decades, hackers fell squarely into two camps: “black hats” in it to show off their skills, and then later, for money, espionage and data theft, and “white hats” who breached systems to uncover flaws before the bad guys could find them and make sure companies promptly fix them.

Now, destruction for destruction’s sake has become a hallmark of the global cyberattack.  The foremost example being the 2012 Shamoon attack in Saudi Arabia on one of the world's largest oil companies, that wiped or destroyed 35,000 computers before the devastation was halted. Similar attacks aiming to render PC hardware inoperable have continued since, with Shamoon 2.0 earlier this year or even some of the NotPetya variants more recently. With malicious actors everywhere looking for any possible exploit, one key to surviving the constant escalation of threats is to keep reinventing how you stay ahead of the game.

A new Security Advisory Board organized by HP aims to do just that, by bringing a trio of outside security experts inside the company. All three initial members have unique first-hand expertise in the world of hacking and the latest developments in security technology and strategies.  

Michael CalceMichael CalceThe board builds on over two decades of HP leadership in cybersecurity for endpoint devices. As the world’s largest PC manufacturer and leading maker of printers, HP has driven a slew of security innovations, from technology that provides cryptographically secure updates of a device’s BIOS to run-time intrusion detection, which checks for anomalies, automatically rebooting when an intrusion is detected.

These security experts will act as a reconnaissance team, providing insights from the front lines that the company will use to reinforce its own security work. The board will also generate strategic conversations about the rapidly shifting security landscape with HP executives and the market. 

“We want to be the sharpest we can be on what the future holds, understanding the threat landscape today and being able to address the real problems of tomorrow,” says Boris Balacheff, HP’s chief technologist for system security research and innovation. 

The person HP chose to lead the advisory board is far from your run-of-the-mill corporate security expert. The new chairman, security consultant Michael Calce, a.k.a. “Mafiaboy,” launched his public career in 2000 at the age of 15 by unleashing a massive cyberattack that brought down Yahoo!, eBay and Amazon. It led to an FBI manhunt and $1.7 billion in economic fallout.  

Robert MasseRobert MasseJoining him is Robert Masse, a partner at a major consulting firm (acting independently in this instance), with more than 20 years of experience in cybersecurity, focusing on risk management and – ironically – a shared history with Calce. Following his own run-in with law enforcement over hacking when he was a teen, Masse provided guidance to Calce after his arrest.

A third member is Justine Bone, who began her career doing reverse engineering and vulnerability research at New Zealand’s version of the U.S. National Security Agency before leading security for companies, including Bloomberg LP. She’s now the CEO of MedSec, which analyzes technology security for healthcare companies.Justine BoneJustine Bone

The Security Advisory Board will work with HP to identify evolving threats and help companies adapt to the fundamental changes taking place in the security landscape. One of these changes is that inadequate security can’t be hidden anymore; the hackers’ armory is too deep and sophisticated and automated attack tools are constantly on the lookout for flaws to exploit. Bone says it takes only two and a half minutes after you plug in a smart camera or screw in a smart light bulb for an internet bot to compromise that device. Billions of connected devices span every inch of our economy and our lives, from supply chains and energy grids to connected cars.

That’s putting everyone under a microscope, from the top of the chain to the bottom. “Security has become an imperative for our customers,” says HP’s Balacheff.  With the average U.S. breach costing $7 million and intensifying scrutiny from consumers and investors, it’s increasingly clear that everyone throughout an organization, from a company’s security group up to the board, needs to be involved in anticipating security threats. “Originally cybersecurity was an IT problem. What we’re seeing is now it's being heavily looked at by the board and the audit and risk committee and treated like any other risk,” says Masse. “I think now's the time where we really have the opportunity to improve things at a much better level than before.”

Additionally, organizations need help understanding just how profoundly the thinking behind security strategy needs to change. Traditionally, companies felt that software or network security solutions would be the answer, however with the evolution of attacker sophistication and our increased dependency on devices for everything we do, it is no longer that simple. Security needs to start at the lowest level of hardware and firmware design.

When baby monitors are conscripted into botnets to launch assaults that take down Twitter and Netflix, it’s clear that any connected device can be attacked. And as the flood of network-connected gadgets continues to rise — 20 billion such devices are expected to be in service by 2020 — this challenge will only grow.

That’s why every device must be built from the ground up to be secure and able to adapt, says Calce. This principle is one the tech industry has always preached, but hasn’t always practiced. An example of this, Calce explains, is when a computer or printer boots up: up to a million lines of code can be executed before the device’s operating system is even loaded, in what is known the device's 'firmware' (often still referred to as BIOS in PCs). This occurs before the user is even able to see any kind of welcome screen. Designing protections, but also the ability to detect attack and recover a compromised device, that is how far HP has gone, trailblazing the future of endpoint security by designing hardware-enforced cyber-resilient devices.

“For years,” says Bone, “software and hardware makers were able to rely on security by obscurity. There was no upside to building in this quality all the way through the product because nobody was asking questions. Now, though, people are definitely asking.”

That’s where HP has been focused for years. The security board members say it’s paying off — that’s why they’re eager to work with HP to get this message out. 

“HP is looking to implement security on anything and everything they develop,” says Calce. “That’s the type of mindset we need if we ever want to have some level of security in this world.”

For more information on how HP is creating the most secure business devices in the world visit www.hp.com/reinventsecurity.

Published: September 01, 2017

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What might entice a gamer away from the siren call of the screen and comfort of the couch? A gaming conference tops the list, with a chance to connect with other gamers, test drive the latest technology and meet esport heroes. 

This weekend, up to 80,000 gamers are set to descend on the Washington State Convention Center in downtown Seattle for PAX West, one of the largest gaming conferences in the U.S. At the convention, gamers from around the world have the opportunity to check out the HP OMEN gaming lineup, including the latest additions to the family.

 

“The OMEN team is excited to bring the full OMEN family to the celebration of all things gaming that is PAX West,” said Spike Huang, director of product management for gaming and virtual reality at HP. “Attendees will be able to compete for Real Life Loot Boxes while playing on OMEN X, plus try out the brand-new HP Windows Mixed Reality Headset—our very first headset in partnership with Microsoft.”

OMEN_Arcade_Logo_bg_v1_sml.jpgThe OMEN Arcade inside the OMEN by HP booth invites esport athletes to try out HP OMEN X desktop PCs as they compete in a 3v3 Overwatch tournament—a celebration of the eagerly awaited Overwatch World Cup, of which OMEN by HP is an official sponsor. Guests play for cool OMEN and Overwatch swag and a chance to win Real Life Loot Boxes. The OMEN by HP booth also features a product showcase of the entire HP OMEN family, where visitors can test drive the new OMEN X Laptop. An additional 32 OMEN stations are available for free play in the main stage area.

During PAX West, Microsoft and HP will unveil a consumer version of the HP Windows Mixed Reality Developer Edition Headsetwhich was announced earlier this year.

Designed with gamers top-of-mind, this plug-and-play headset with controllers delivers a stunning and immersive mixed reality experience thanks to 1440 x 1440 resolution per eye, up to a 90Hz refresh rate (all performance specifications represent the typical specifications provided by HP's component manufacturers; actual performance may vary either higher or lower), and wireless motion controllers. Plus, an incredibly comfortable double-padded band and easy adjustments means gamers can play for hours.

Expected to be available in the U.S. on Tuesday, October 17, the headset will retail at HP.com for $449.99; this price includes the headset, two motion controllers and 4 AA batteries. It can also be purchased at Best Buy and through Microsoft, and retailer pricing may vary by location. Pricing is subject to change without notice.  

Find out more by following @OMENbyHP and the hashtags #DominatewithOMEN and #OMENCHALLENGE.

Published: August 07, 2017

As HP continues its journey to reinvent the global manufacturing industry, it is critical to have visionary and experienced leaders charting the way. Michelle Bockman, former executive vice president at GE Digital, recently joined HP to lead its 3D printing market expansion efforts.

At GE, Bockman most recently led the company’s ambitious strategy to build a software-driven digital future for large industrial customers. With more than 20 years of experience in a wide range of functions and industries, she’s led global operations, managed engineering, driven sales and marketing, built new digital businesses – even ran an industrial manufacturing plant.

Michelle BockmanMichelle BockmanBockman’s diverse experience gives her a fresh perspective on unlocking new value for customers who are reinventing their operations. We caught up with her to learn more about keys to driving the digital industrial transformation of production.

 

Q. Why did you choose this time to join HP?

A. We’re on the cusp of a new industrial revolution that could be greater than anything we’ve ever seen – ubiquitous connectivity, AI, robotics, the internet of things, 3D printing and more are all converging to drive unprecedented social and economic change. HP plays a central role in this revolution and is really leading the way with innovations in 3D printing, blended reality and other technologies businesses are embracing in their digital reinventions. Put this all together and we are poised to transform some of the largest industries on the face of the earth.

This is the place to be if you want to profoundly change the way people live, work and interact with one another. HP is one of the founders of Silicon Valley and has a strong heritage of reinvention which, quite frankly, also appealed to my entrepreneurial spirit. I can’t tell you how excited I am about this adventure in innovation. 

 

Q. Tell us about your new role leading the expansion of 3D Printing for HP. Where will you be focused?

A. To grossly oversimplify, I have a broad responsibility to expand the overall 3D printing market for HP in partnership with our foundational customers, strategic partners, and materials ecosystem, and drive the development of new digital services for the 3D printing business. What this really means is focusing on customer outcomes by working deeply with market leaders such as BMW, Jabil, Johnson & Johnson, and Nike as they embrace 3D printing to transform their businesses, and applying these lessons learned to the entirety of our product portfolio, so we can really accelerate development of new applications and services. 

It also means leading our global strategic alliances with SIs and software partners, and to drive our open materials strategy with the largest chemical companies on earth, as we’ll need to leverage the world to transform a $12 trillion industry. Finally, no digital industrial transformation is complete without developing the next generation of connected, digital services that unlock unique insights and value for our customers and partners.  

Q. As a longtime industry veteran, where do you see the greatest opportunities for change?

A. 3D printing technology has been around awhile, but it’s poised for a real breakout. The combination of new technology such as HP’s Multi Jet Fusion, which is up to 10 times faster and half the cost of other systems, plus the radical expansion of new materials with a simultaneous plummet in cost due to our open materials platform, means the economic promise of 3D printing is finally ready to deliver. This is no longer technology just for prototyping or the R&D team. This is a platform for large-scale industrial production. 
Couple the continued march of those innovations with the larger digital transformation unfolding across the entire design, production, and distribution workflow, and you have a massive opportunity to help companies innovate faster, be more agile in their manufacturing, and implement more flexible supply chains. This unlocks huge economic opportunity, new business models, and competitive advantage. I believe that those who invest in digital transformation will reap the rewards, and we are just scratching the surface of what this reinvention means for some of the largest companies and industries in the world.

Q. You’ve led a diverse range of functions over your career.  What else can you share with us from your journey?

A. I like to solve really hard problems with smart, curious and passionate people in industries that are changing the world. That’s what drew me to mechanical engineering in college and continues to drive me today. Over the course of my career, I’ve been lucky enough to experience many facets of businesses – from leading large organizations through change to developing new products and services to direct and daily interaction with the customer. At the end of the day what we do really matters if it delivers value to our customers and, in my mind, also delivers value to the world at large. I couldn’t be more thrilled to be part of the HP 3D printing team, which is striving to achieve exactly those goals.

Published: July 25, 2017

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Let’s face it, while making compromises might build good moral fiber, it’s usually not much fun. Thankfully, the new HP Pavilion All-In-Ones makes having it all seem easy. How? HP has added a slew of its premium product features into the new Pavilion lineup.Moscato_R_Hero_FrontLeft_KBMouse.jpg

Today, the company announced a pair of revamped Pavilion All-in-One (AiO) devices just in time for the back-to-school spree. Pitched as the magnet that draws the family together, the new devices have perks for parents and kids as do-all, no-compromise PCs. Parents can listen to music, get news, pull up recipes, pay bills, and watch favorite shows. Kids can do homework, create videos and edit and share photos. Family movie night becomes an immersive entertainment experience on the Pavilion AiO. 

“We listened to our customers when redesigning the HP Pavilion All-in-One to ensure we’re bringing features consumers crave, making it the perfect overall family PC,” said Kevin Frost, vice president and general manager, Consumer Personal Systems, Displays & Accessories at HP. “It’s a powerful desktop that can handle whatever a family wants to do—connect, work, create, or consume—while the architecturally-inspired design packs style and personality to make it a home-enhancing investment.”

 

Premium features

Just-right 24” or 27” edge-to-edge full HD, in-plane switching (IPS) screens serve up crisp text, sharp images, and vibrant photos. A fabric overlay on the speakers, and audio custom-tuned by B&O Play provide more acoustic transparency for a richer, clearer, immersive sound. And staying closely connected has never been so simple or fun. Post, chat, like, stream and share—across the globe or down the hall.

You can finally remove that unsightly tape or sticky note from your webcamnow, there’s a better way. Returning to this generation of All-in-Ones is HP’s privacy cameras, a must-have feature for the many customers who cite privacy as an important concern, especially with kids in the house. HP included a webcam that safely tucks out of sight when not in use. An optional infrared camera adds another layer of security with face authentication through Windows Hello.  Privacy camera stows away when not in use.Privacy camera stows away when not in use.

The latest 7th generation Intel Core processor delivers an exceptional level of performance for working, surfing, streaming or creating. Along with the versatility of the Pavilion line, AiO displays are built to last—the die-cast aluminum and metal stand includes a hinge tilt that is tested for the equivalent of three times a day for nine years. It’s not only stylish, but also durable.

And that tilt range goes from -5 degrees to +35 degrees, so it’s easy to find the perfect, neck-friendly view. Expansive touchscreens are a more natural way to interact with your PC, and a more engaging way for kids to learn and connect. Plus, it’s easy to share with HDMI input/output that enables you to add a second monitor or project to your TV.

At only 8.5 mm—approximately 40 percent thinner than the previous generation—this is the slimmest Pavilion All-in-one to date.At only 8.5 mm—approximately 40 percent thinner than the previous generation—this is the slimmest Pavilion All-in-one to date.Talking about multitasking, not only does the Pavilion AiO work hard as the home’s communications and entertainment center, it looks fantastic doing it. At only 8.5mm—approximately 40 percent thinner than the previous generation—this is the slimmest Pavilion All-in-one to date. All the hardware is packed in the bottom, making the display ultra-thin. Although the profile and strategically placed ports keep desks neat, the modern, clean design and fabric accents make it look great in any room of the house.

 

Creation station 

AAA_9294-5-24.jpgGot a casual gamer or budding video creator in the house? Optional AMD Radeon 530 Discrete Graphics and up to 16 GB of memory supply the performance and faster response rate for graphics-intensive activities such as  gaming, and for demanding applications such as photo and video editing.

To improve the experience even more, HP has put extensive customer insights to work, which resulted in minimizing the amount of pre-installed software and desktop clutter. This more streamlined experience translates to improved OS operation and general system performance.

Powered for productivity, created to connect and entertain, and designed to enhance the home, these newly redesigned HP Pavilion All-in-Ones gives consumers tools to do it all, without trade-offs.

For more on the new smart, stylish HP Pavilion All-in-Ones, visit: www.hp.com/go/pavilion-allinone.