HP newsroom blog
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Published: June 26, 2017

Some of the 3D printed designs created by students of KiraKira3D's  curricula.Some of the 3D printed designs created by students of KiraKira3D's curricula.

 Anybody who’s encountered a middle- or high-schooler studying math or science has heard this frustrating complaint: “When am I going to use this in real life?” 

KiraKira3D Founder and CEO Suz SomersallKiraKira3D Founder and CEO Suz SomersallIt’s the very same question that Suz Somersall, CEO and Founder of KiraKira3D, had as an aspiring engineering student at Brown University, where she found the materials for learning mechanical engineering software utilitarian, lacking context and mostly geared toward men. She was turned off by lesson plans for creating hand tools, auto parts and gears, she said, objects that didn’t seem to further her ambitions to be an artist and designer.

“I wanted to study engineering, but the content offered in the intro classes wasn’t very compelling,” she said. “What I wanted was to be inspired to be creative.”

It’s one of the reasons Somersall started KiraKira Academy, which aims to close the gender gap in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) by teaching students the technical skills needed to create virtual and physical products using computer aided design (CAD) software.

KiraKira3D said this week it’s working with HP to produce a new series of approachable, video-based lessons to teach 3D design skills using the Sprout Pro by HP 3D scanning and printing platform.

Students who create 3D objects via software tools can get their designs printed on HP Multi Jet Fusion printers and shipped to them by HP 3D print partner Shapeways.

The goal is to help get more STEAM (science, technology engineering, art and design, and math) curricula into classrooms, so that students—especially girls—can master 3D design, modeling and printing skills through project-based learning.  

deckphoto.jpg

“3D printers and 3D scanners are really incredible tools for STEAM education, but we have to get this into classrooms at a really early age otherwise we miss the opportunity for engagement,” Somersall said. “We are trying to have a range of class content so nobody feels excluded.”

KiraKira3D learners can create a variety of things, including space-inspired decor, sunglasses, household objects, tabletop games, and through the company’s “fashioneer” series, designer jewelry. The video lessons—most of which feature female instructors who are engineers, animators, designers, architects and computer scientists—teach basics in Autodesk TinkerCAD and Maya, Fusion 360, Solidworks, Rhino 3D and other design, animation and 3D modeling software.

“Our instructors lead students through a creative process with design thinking, and produce something really compelling at the end of the lesson,” Somersall said. “We are trying to blend art and engineering skills while also getting the students comfortable with making mistakes or going off on their own and put their own twist on a design.”

The customization possibilities makes KiraKira3D’s approach a good fit for Sprout Pro by HP, which is uniquely suited for education, tinkering and experimentation. Dubbed an Immersive Computing platform, Sprout Pro blurs the barriers between the physical and digital worlds by way of a fully-functional PC and built-in cameras and projectors that enable 2D and 3D scanning and image manipulation – right from the desktop.Second-generation Sprout Pro by HPSecond-generation Sprout Pro by HP

 “HP’s collaboration with KiraKira3D will bring new learning opportunities to millions of students with a special emphasis on inspiring women and girls to engage in STEM-related activities,” said Gus Schmedlen, vice president of education at HP. “KiraKira3D’s instructional videos and hands-on experiences using the latest HP Immersive and Multi Jet Fusion Technologies will empower students to master the skills needed for the jobs of the future.”

HP and KiraKira3D are developing a series of 10 video lessons for Sprout Pro by HP that are set to be available for free next month on KiraKira3D.com.

KiraKira3D and HP share a common vision for 3D printing and see its potential to disrupt manufacturing, retail and ushers in an era of consumer customization.

“Democratizing access to these types of skills is increasingly important as 3D printing becomes more ubiquitous,” Somersall said. “We are really excited to see the things our students will create.”

    3D Printing Education
Published: December 07, 2017

First place team for Office Print Relevance track: Delaware State UniversityFirst place team for Office Print Relevance track: Delaware State University

Driving systemic change to increase the number of women and people of color working in the technology industry – especially in leadership roles – has long been a part of HP’s Silicon Valley legacy. Diversity and inclusion propel dynamic ingenuity at the highest levels of the company, helping HP win in the marketplace while creating lasting impact in the industry and beyond.

With diversity at our core, HP aligns our words with real actions – including embracing new, creative ways to become the employer of choice for women and underrepresented groups in technology. The HP HBCU Business Challenge is a perfect example of this. Launched earlier this year to reflect the messages in our first ad spot in the “Reinvent Mindsets” series, this new business-case competition embodies our commitment to investing in our future workforce by engaging university students capable of reinventing the landscape.

Cultivating new and diverse talent pipelines

First place team for PC Services Innovation track:  Xavier University of LouisianaFirst place team for PC Services Innovation track: Xavier University of LouisianaHP partnered with the National HBCU Business Deans Roundtable to provide over 80 historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) with a chance to participate in the competition, which challenged participating teams to submit a written business plan and qualified them for a chance to present to HP senior leaders. 17 HCBU campuses submitted plans across two tracks – PC Services Innovation and Office Print Relevance. Throughout the challenge, student teams showcased their talent to HP executives, including the business challenge executive sponsors Bill Avey, General Manager & Global Head of Personal Systems Services, Tom Saathoff, Head of Strategy & Portfolio Management for Managed Print Services, and Darren Needham-Walker, Head of Worldwide Office Printing Solutions Marketing. Student team members also learned about internships and full-time career opportunities with HP.

What, exactly, were these students competing for? The winning teams scored visits to three HP campuses – including Boise, Vancouver and HP headquarters in Palo Alto. In addition, they will meet and present their projects to Chief Diversity Officer Lesley Slaton Brown, members of HP’s Executive Leadership team, hiring managers, and others. Teams will tour HP Labs, visit the original offices of HP Founders and the HP Garage where the company’s legacy began.

Fields Jackson, Executive Director of the National HBCU Business Deans Roundtable and CEO of Racing Toward Diversity magazine, helped bring the competition to life. He partnered with HP to enable the National HBCU Business Deans Roundtable further its primary goal: to better prepare students for the workforce while equipping them with opportunities to participate in real-world business initiatives.

“The National HBCU Business Deans Roundtable works to cultivate strategic partnerships with corporate companies like HP, providing essential tools and resources to prepare students during their university and post-graduation careers,” said Jackson. “With HP’s pioneering history in technology and passion for diversity and inclusion, it was an easy decision for the National HBCU Business Deans Roundtable to put its resounding support behind this new program.”

Honoring the HP HBCU Business Challenge winners

At the end of November, HP announced the winners from each of the challenge tracks. Each winning team displayed new knowledge in their business plans, along with out-of-the box thinking and disruptive recommendations that could help HP drive Office Print Relevance and PC Services forward.

And the winners are:

  1. First place team for PC Services Innovation track:  Xavier University of Louisiana

Team members: Janelle Jones, Aaliyah Young, Cydney Stevenson, Alaina McClue

Business Plan Submission: These students created a Device as a Service (DaaS) solution for the education vertical market, including new features that would bring more customizable technology to classrooms for teachers and students alike.

 

  1. First place team for Office Print Relevance track: Delaware State University

Team members: Kyron Bonner, Nyla Obey, Emma Pollock, Justin Thompson, Nicholas Henry

Business Plan Submission: This team developed a plan for an HP Smart Printer to make printing relevant for millennial decision makers, including enhancements to make it dynamic, intelligent, simple and secure. 

 

At the end of the three month challenge, participants emphasized the importance of this growth opportunity. HP executives provided mentorship throughout the process, and were impressed with how the teams performed.

“As an executive sponsor of the HP HBCU Business Challenge, the journey was transformative for the students as well as the HP employees who participated,” said Bill Avey. “We can’t wait to continue with this challenge in the years to come – not only because it allows us to connect with university talent, but because it helps HP cultivate our hiring pipeline on our reinvention journey.”

HP constantly looks for new, creative ways to build diverse talent pipelines across industries. We want everyone, everywhere to know that HP is hiring – and that talent is our only criteria. The HP HBCU Business Challenge demonstrated progress toward accomplishing this goal, inspiring tomorrow’s leaders along the way.

Published: December 06, 2017

HU_HP_OMEN_GAMING_ARENA.PNG

 

eSports is the latest phenomenon engaging the next generation of students. The rise of eSports has been meteoric with revenues expected in the $100B range globally this year alone. In fact, more millennial males watch eSports than traditional spectator sports like baseball or hockey, according to a survey conducted by Newzoo, an eSports market research firm, and it is expected that the global fan base of eSports will exceed 500 million by 2020. This is a white-hot arena, and higher education has taken notice.

Today in Pennsylvania, Harrisburg University of Science and Technology announced an all-new arena to support its first and only varsity sport: eSports. Powered by OMEN Gaming PCs and accessories, this state-of-the art arena will support its three varsity teams competing in Overwatch®, League of Legends™ and Hearthstone™, as well as more casual gamers from the university and local communities. Harrisburg University president Eric Darr announced that the Whitaker Center for Science and the Arts would become the official arena for the institution’s varsity eSports team.

 

“The growing phenomenon of eSports has captured the hearts and minds of avid gamers and spectators around the globe," said Darr. “We are enthusiastic about our chances of becoming a major player in the world of collegiate eSports with the unveiling of this new arena.”

Like the new Harrisburg University arena, campuses all over the world have created intercollegiate eSports teams. This is why HP created the OMEN Gaming Arena for Higher Education reference designs, offering campuses a variety of arena configurations from 20 seats to over 100, all pre-configured to create an exceptional fast, but level playing field for pro-level competitive eSports. These collegiate arenas complement HP’s relationship with the Overwatch League and all of our industry-leading OMEN gaming gear.

Gaming is quickly becoming a keystone for the Campus of the Future

In higher education, the office of student affairs has become a crucial driver of improved student success. eSports arenas – whether casual or professional-level – provide campuses with a modern facility to engage gamers of all abilities, while keeping students engaged in the campus community. Moreover, many campus eSports arenas are also open to public use, increasing community engagement, especially with local youth. Community engagement is what drove Harrisburg University to choose the Whitaker Center as the marquis venue for the new arena.

 

“Whitaker Center is the “crown jewel” of downtown Harrisburg, the bustling state capitol of Pennsylvania, and is an ideal location for showcasing eSports events and HP’s state-of-the-art gaming technology,” said Ted Black, President and CEO of the Whitaker Center. “Our collaboration with HP and Harrisburg University will be a beacon to attract fans and players from every corner of the eSports world. This one-of-a-kind venue represents a seismic change for collegiate eSports!”

HU_HP_OMEN_GAMING_ARENA_2.png

 

Gaming innovation delivered through strategic collaborations with D&H and Intel®

One critical lynchpin of the project’s planning and success to date has been the expertise of D&H Distributing, a leading international technology distributor. HP and D&H have collaborated to bring more innovation to campus eSports through unique programs which help institutions design, configure, deploy and manage eSports arenas throughout the United States and Canada.

 

“D&H is proud to be aligned with great local names such as Harrisburg University and the Whitaker Center, plus global technology brands HP and Intel®,” said Dan Schwab, Co-CEO at D&H Distribution. “We are excited to be a part of this incredible eSports explosion, and what better way to do so than by helping accelerate adoption and visibility less than two miles from our corporate offices.”

Another essential partner has been Intel® – a leader in eSports and PC gaming performance. From the high performance Intel® Core™ i7 processors to the Intel® Optane™ SSD 900P Series acceleration technology, Intel® has been an indispensable partner in engineering next-generation gaming and eSports experiences. Their support of the OMEN Collegiate eSports Arenas has fueled even more innovation, as their experienced team helps optimize loadouts, networks, graphics and synchronization to ensure the best gaming experiences possible.

The new eSports arena at Harrisburg University signals a new direction in higher education. We look forward to partnering with many more institutions in the coming year to bring eSports to campuses all over the world.

To learn more about HP’s commitment to higher education and gaming, visit hp.com/hied, and follow @OMENbyHP and the hashtag #DominateTheGame

 

Published: November 29, 2017

FitStation_029.jpg

 

Today, FitStation powered by HP announced that Brooks Running Company, which designs and markets high-performance running shoes, apparel and accessories in more than 60 countries worldwide, is partnering with FitStation to deliver the first-ever fully custom running shoes. FitStation, a new platform that delivers custom-fitted and individualized footwear through innovative 3D scanning, dynamic gait analysis, and manufacturing technologies, has piloted the innovative biometric-based running shoe development platform at 11 premium retail locations across the US, to rave reviews.

Brooks is committed to providing the experience each runner wants. The ability to deliver a personalized shoe based on an individual’s unique biomechanics is an important offering for the runner who is interested in tip-of-the-spear technology and a totally tuned ride,” said Brooks CEO Jim Weber. “As part of our focus on reinventing performance running, we will continue to push the envelope to bring runners new innovations that help them tailor their unique running experience.”FitStation_003.jpg

 

FitStation combined with Brooks’ deep understanding of runners’ unique biomechanics and commitment to providing personalized experiences that enhance the run for the individual, brings Run Signature to the next level and delivers the most personalized individualized running footwear, all based on the customer’s personal data. This personalized footwear will be available via special order through select retail partners beginning June 2018.   

The Brooks announcement comes on the heels of another key partnership; in October, HP joined partner Steitz Secura at A+A in Germany. A safety shoe specialist, Steitz Secura is using FitStation to aid in its focus on comfort, preventative health and safety.

The digital foot scanning platform allows customers to create a profile, choose to receive personalized off-the-shelf insole and shoe recommendations, fully customized 3D printed insoles, or receive their own pair of truly individualized custom footwear. This unique solution analyzes each foot using a combination of 3D scanning and pressure plate technology to deliver a complete dynamic gait analysis for the individual. FitStation analyzes the data and produces details for custom shoes with polyurethane injected midsoles, that vary in density based on the customer's precise needs. Then, the products can be produced locally for unbelievable ease and speed.FitStation_006.jpg

 

Reinventing how the world designs, manufactures, and sells

FitStation is HP’s next step in the company’s journey to reinvent how the world designs and manufactures with commercial 3D technologies. It’s also a significant leap in reimaging what the retail experience of the future will look like. While brick and mortar stores have faced challenges as online shopping grows in popularity, there is still a deep desire for in-store experiences. But the store of the future needs to engage customers in fresh, tailored ways. Offerings that deliver individualized ‘you-get-me’ options will win the retail wars. "FitStation by HP is changing what personalization means—from the in-store experience to the final product. In collaboration with Brooks and Superfeet, we are delivering truly made-to-measure footwear with a lot size of one,” said Ed Ponomarev, general manager of FitStation and business development HP Inc. “Digitalization of biometric data opens an opportunity to ultimate individualization with the speed and cost efficiency of mass production. HP brings deep experience in computing, scanning and technology integration at scale to deliver a revolutionary digital manufacturing platform, creating individualized products that are available to anyone—from casual runners to elite athletes.”

“Without question, the system is on the cutting edge within our industry, and the level of engagement with our consumers is remarkable. FitStation has become an integral component now in our standard shoe-fitting process with our business. In addition to a cool experience, the system allows us the opportunity to sell the consumer a very personalized ME3D insole while never having to stock an inventory item...positively brilliant,” said Adam White of Running Central.FitStation_015.jpg

 

FitStation uses HP Multi Jet Fusion printing technology to manufacture the world’s first 3D printed insoles made using 3D scanning and dynamic gait analysis to create a one-of-a-kind digital profile of each foot. Superfeet, the leader in innovative, over-the-counter insoles, is piloting the platform in select stores across the 4,000 retail locations where they have a presence.

"For 40 years, we have set the standard for shape and fit. Until today, the technology to deliver a 3D printed insole that meets Superfeet’s exacting standards didn’t exist,” said Eric Hayes, Chief Marketing Officer at Superfeet. “Our new solution allows us to create the most individualized shape and fit on the planet.” 

"FitStation is a truly disruptive platform that will improves people’s lives and change the way people purchase footwear and shoe insoles,” said Louis Kim, Global Head of Immersive Computing, Personal Systems, HP Inc. “We are reinventing the footwear shopping experience, bringing a level of customization and personalization never before seen. We are stitching HP’s capabilities in 3D scanning and 3D printing to bring this Blended Reality vision to life and are working with leading partners within the footwear industry to develop this revolutionary platform.”

Learn more about FitStation powered by HP.

Published: November 27, 2017

Multi-jet-fusion printed part on the left and a high resolution scan of the indicated portion of it on the right  showing the micro surface structure used  for authentication.Multi-jet-fusion printed part on the left and a high resolution scan of the indicated portion of it on the right showing the micro surface structure used for authentication.An HP Labs investigation into accurately identifying and authenticating 3D-printed objects is helping enable a future where parts for high performance machines like jet engines are routinely printed to order. It may also aid the development of new systems for tracking physical objects of any kind on a massive scale.

HP Labs Distinguished Technologist Stephen PollardHP Labs Distinguished Technologist Stephen Pollard

 “To use a 3D printed part in a machine like an aero-engine, you need to be able to confidently identify and track that part after it has been printed from a known and trusted printer,” observes Bristol, UK-based researcher Stephen Pollard.

One way to do that would be to add a unique identifier like a bar code to each printed item. But Pollard and his colleagues in HP’s Print Adjacencies and 3D Lab wanted to come up with an approach that added no processing or materials cost to the 3D printing process and that would also have applicability for 3D objects created via more conventional methods.

Their solution: a low cost, three-stage, automated identification and authentication system that doesn’t require a printed object to be readied for authentication in any way.  

It works by first designating a small area of the object to be tracked as the location of a “virtual forensic mark.” This need only be a centimeter or so square and can easily be pre-assigned in the digital version of the 3D object before it is printed.   

Once the item is printed, it is robotically scanned so that the location of the virtual forensic mark can be identified. Finally, a second, very high resolution scanner takes a measurement of that small area. It’s so accurate – detecting surface differences of just two thousandths of a millimeter - that it can establish a unique digital signature for every printed version of an identical 3D object.

With this identifying information on file, the object can be scanned again whenever a confirmation of the object’s specific identity is needed.

“It’s like a fingerprint scanner for physical objects,” says Pollard.

The team has already created prototypes for most of the elements in their system. They next plan to miniaturize and integrate them together into a single prototype device, creating a tool that does the work of instruments that currently cost tens of thousands of dollars for under $100 per machine.HP Labs research engineer Faisal AzharHP Labs research engineer Faisal Azhar

One major challenge will be to place each of these elements together in way that allows the process to be fully automated, adds Labs researcher Faisal Azhar.  

“The other hard problem we face is extracting reliable and repeatable signatures of the 3D parts,” Azhar says. “We are already able to make incredibly accurate scans but those scans need to be reliably repeatable to be confident that the object we identify right after printing is the same object we later want to place, for example, in a machine.”

At present, the system is optimized to scan the surface of objects created by HP 3D printers. But the Labs identification and authentication team plans to expand its capabilities to include objects made from a more diverse array of materials.

More broadly, they are also looking to measure properties of 3D objects beyond their shape, and devise methods for further enhancing production line integration and automated machine interactions with them. “This “forensic” level of authentication and identification will really come into its own when 3D printing moves from prototyping and into production, and manufacturers are printing millions and even billions of copies of any one part,” says Pollard.

Published: November 14, 2017

Cheryl MacleodCheryl Macleod

One of the biggest factors in HP’s rise as the world’s innovation leader in 3D printing, the disruptive technology set to transform the $12 trillion global manufacturing industry, is a long heritage of printing leadership and reinvention that goes back decades.

The building blocks of HP’s groundbreaking Multi Jet Fusion 3D printing technology are actually rooted in one of the company’s most historic innovations, thermal Inkjet technology, which remains the gold standard for home and office printers some 30 years later.

For a good example of how HP’s past continues to inform its future, look no further than the 23-year company veteran who was recently appointed to lead one of its most cutting-edge organizations: Cheryl Macleod, HP’s new Global Head of 3D Fusion Science.

 

One thing that links your interests in science, cooking, and travel is a love of learning. What are some of your earliest memories of learning?

My earliest memories of learning weren’t in school, they were at home with my older brother, trying to keep up with him. I’ve always had a bit of a competitive streak. In first grade when he came home and said, “I know how to read,” I went straight to my mom and said “I want to read, too!” I also remember my mom taking us out on nature walks and looking under every rock and stump to see what creatures might be living there. That really taught me the value of experiential learning.

What drew you to science as a career?

I actually wanted to be a musician, but didn’t think it would pay the bills. I was really good in math and science so I got my bachelor’s degree in biomedical engineering. But then I decided to change my focus to chemical engineering and went to UC Berkeley with the intent of getting a masters in that area, but then I switched again to a PhD program so I could spend more time doing hands-on research instead of sitting in a library. It’s that love of experiential learning again.

How did that bring you to HP?

The research in my PhD program was in the area of surface and colloid chemistry, which involves studying the relationships between properties in materials that are too small to be seen with the naked eye. It was that fascination with extremely small things that brought me to HP’s Inkjet business. The technology behind it is essentially teeny tiny drops shooting out of really complex but small devices to make incredible images on paper. I was hooked.

You’ve been here for 23 years in a multitude of R&D roles. How have you seen the company evolve?

When I joined the company, Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard had both recently retired but they were still an incredibly strong presence, and most of the leaders in the company had worked with them directly. But then in subsequent years, I think the company began to move towards focusing more on short-term results than the big innovation picture that Bill and Dave founded it on. In the last two years it’s been really exciting to see our entire leadership team take the company back to its roots and reinfuse it with big, long-term commitments to innovation, talent, and disruptive technologies like 3D printing.

Who have your greatest mentors been?

There have been many, but the one who sticks out most was my first director at HP. I remember during my second week here I was invited to have a one-on-one with him. I was so struck that in this lab of literally hundreds of people, the director would take the time to meet with every new employee just to get to know them. That’s something I’ve always carried with me. Whenever I join a new organization I try to meet with every single person within the first few months. So many people have told me, “That’s never happened in my career before.” But for me it’s normal because it happened to me in my second week at HP.

Your new job is leading the Fusion Science organization for HP’s 3D printing business. What exactly does that team do, and what are your goals for it?

We focus on developing the deep science behind the materials that drive our business: the powders and agents that are used in 3D printing with Multi Jet Fusion. We take a very rigorous scientific and engineering approach to understanding and developing both our HP-branded agents and the ones developed by our materials partners. We lead the materials certification process and work directly with our partners to develop their materials and bring them to market. Our biggest long-term goal is to expand the breadth and applications of 3D printing materials to rival the amount used in traditional manufacturing, which is a number in the thousands. We’ve got our work cut out for us.

One of your biggest passions is cooking. What lessons from cooking have you applied to your work?

Well, cooking is all about chemistry: taking things through mixing, processing, and heating to create completely different things. In Indian cooking, the list of ingredients for each dish can sound nearly identical: the same basic spices, the same kinds of vegetables and rice. But the nuance is in the process you use for each one: do you add a certain spice first or last? Is it whole our ground? How long should it simmer? The process has a huge impact on how the dish comes out. So at work I make sure our engineers are very rigorous in documenting their processes in how they fuse things together. It really makes all the difference.

How has being a woman informed your career in a traditionally male-dominated field?

Before I came to HP, I interviewed with a few other companies. Each time, lunchtime would roll around and they’d trot out “The Woman” who worked there to have lunch with me to show me how good their diversity was, which of course wasn’t very convincing at all. Then I came to HP. I didn’t talk to a single woman during my interviews, but as I was walking down the hallways there were women working everywhere: in the labs, on the engineering teams, on the product teams. Nobody went out of their way to try and convince me that HP was a diverse company because I could see it with my own two eyes. As much as anything, that’s what brought me here.