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Published: June 26, 2017

Some of the 3D printed designs created by students of KiraKira3D's  curricula.Some of the 3D printed designs created by students of KiraKira3D's curricula.

 Anybody who’s encountered a middle- or high-schooler studying math or science has heard this frustrating complaint: “When am I going to use this in real life?” 

KiraKira3D Founder and CEO Suz SomersallKiraKira3D Founder and CEO Suz SomersallIt’s the very same question that Suz Somersall, CEO and Founder of KiraKira3D, had as an aspiring engineering student at Brown University, where she found the materials for learning mechanical engineering software utilitarian, lacking context and mostly geared toward men. She was turned off by lesson plans for creating hand tools, auto parts and gears, she said, objects that didn’t seem to further her ambitions to be an artist and designer.

“I wanted to study engineering, but the content offered in the intro classes wasn’t very compelling,” she said. “What I wanted was to be inspired to be creative.”

It’s one of the reasons Somersall started KiraKira Academy, which aims to close the gender gap in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) by teaching students the technical skills needed to create virtual and physical products using computer aided design (CAD) software.

KiraKira3D said this week it’s working with HP to produce a new series of approachable, video-based lessons to teach 3D design skills using the Sprout Pro by HP 3D scanning and printing platform.

Students who create 3D objects via software tools can get their designs printed on HP Multi Jet Fusion printers and shipped to them by HP 3D print partner Shapeways.

The goal is to help get more STEAM (science, technology engineering, art and design, and math) curricula into classrooms, so that students—especially girls—can master 3D design, modeling and printing skills through project-based learning.  

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“3D printers and 3D scanners are really incredible tools for STEAM education, but we have to get this into classrooms at a really early age otherwise we miss the opportunity for engagement,” Somersall said. “We are trying to have a range of class content so nobody feels excluded.”

KiraKira3D learners can create a variety of things, including space-inspired decor, sunglasses, household objects, tabletop games, and through the company’s “fashioneer” series, designer jewelry. The video lessons—most of which feature female instructors who are engineers, animators, designers, architects and computer scientists—teach basics in Autodesk TinkerCAD and Maya, Fusion 360, Solidworks, Rhino 3D and other design, animation and 3D modeling software.

“Our instructors lead students through a creative process with design thinking, and produce something really compelling at the end of the lesson,” Somersall said. “We are trying to blend art and engineering skills while also getting the students comfortable with making mistakes or going off on their own and put their own twist on a design.”

The customization possibilities makes KiraKira3D’s approach a good fit for Sprout Pro by HP, which is uniquely suited for education, tinkering and experimentation. Dubbed an Immersive Computing platform, Sprout Pro blurs the barriers between the physical and digital worlds by way of a fully-functional PC and built-in cameras and projectors that enable 2D and 3D scanning and image manipulation – right from the desktop.Second-generation Sprout Pro by HPSecond-generation Sprout Pro by HP

 “HP’s collaboration with KiraKira3D will bring new learning opportunities to millions of students with a special emphasis on inspiring women and girls to engage in STEM-related activities,” said Gus Schmedlen, vice president of education at HP. “KiraKira3D’s instructional videos and hands-on experiences using the latest HP Immersive and Multi Jet Fusion Technologies will empower students to master the skills needed for the jobs of the future.”

HP and KiraKira3D are developing a series of 10 video lessons for Sprout Pro by HP that are set to be available for free next month on KiraKira3D.com.

KiraKira3D and HP share a common vision for 3D printing and see its potential to disrupt manufacturing, retail and ushers in an era of consumer customization.

“Democratizing access to these types of skills is increasingly important as 3D printing becomes more ubiquitous,” Somersall said. “We are really excited to see the things our students will create.”

    3D Printing Education
Published: November 14, 2017

Cheryl MacleodCheryl Macleod

One of the biggest factors in HP’s rise as the world’s innovation leader in 3D printing, the disruptive technology set to transform the $12 trillion global manufacturing industry, is a long heritage of printing leadership and reinvention that goes back decades.

The building blocks of HP’s groundbreaking Multi Jet Fusion 3D printing technology are actually rooted in one of the company’s most historic innovations, thermal Inkjet technology, which remains the gold standard for home and office printers some 30 years later.

For a good example of how HP’s past continues to inform its future, look no further than the 23-year company veteran who was recently appointed to lead one of its most cutting-edge organizations: Cheryl Macleod, HP’s new Global Head of 3D Fusion Science.

 

One thing that links your interests in science, cooking, and travel is a love of learning. What are some of your earliest memories of learning?

My earliest memories of learning weren’t in school, they were at home with my older brother, trying to keep up with him. I’ve always had a bit of a competitive streak. In first grade when he came home and said, “I know how to read,” I went straight to my mom and said “I want to read, too!” I also remember my mom taking us out on nature walks and looking under every rock and stump to see what creatures might be living there. That really taught me the value of experiential learning.

What drew you to science as a career?

I actually wanted to be a musician, but didn’t think it would pay the bills. I was really good in math and science so I got my bachelor’s degree in biomedical engineering. But then I decided to change my focus to chemical engineering and went to UC Berkeley with the intent of getting a masters in that area, but then I switched again to a PhD program so I could spend more time doing hands-on research instead of sitting in a library. It’s that love of experiential learning again.

How did that bring you to HP?

The research in my PhD program was in the area of surface and colloid chemistry, which involves studying the relationships between properties in materials that are too small to be seen with the naked eye. It was that fascination with extremely small things that brought me to HP’s Inkjet business. The technology behind it is essentially teeny tiny drops shooting out of really complex but small devices to make incredible images on paper. I was hooked.

You’ve been here for 23 years in a multitude of R&D roles. How have you seen the company evolve?

When I joined the company, Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard had both recently retired but they were still an incredibly strong presence, and most of the leaders in the company had worked with them directly. But then in subsequent years, I think the company began to move towards focusing more on short-term results than the big innovation picture that Bill and Dave founded it on. In the last two years it’s been really exciting to see our entire leadership team take the company back to its roots and reinfuse it with big, long-term commitments to innovation, talent, and disruptive technologies like 3D printing.

Who have your greatest mentors been?

There have been many, but the one who sticks out most was my first director at HP. I remember during my second week here I was invited to have a one-on-one with him. I was so struck that in this lab of literally hundreds of people, the director would take the time to meet with every new employee just to get to know them. That’s something I’ve always carried with me. Whenever I join a new organization I try to meet with every single person within the first few months. So many people have told me, “That’s never happened in my career before.” But for me it’s normal because it happened to me in my second week at HP.

Your new job is leading the Fusion Science organization for HP’s 3D printing business. What exactly does that team do, and what are your goals for it?

We focus on developing the deep science behind the materials that drive our business: the powders and agents that are used in 3D printing with Multi Jet Fusion. We take a very rigorous scientific and engineering approach to understanding and developing both our HP-branded agents and the ones developed by our materials partners. We lead the materials certification process and work directly with our partners to develop their materials and bring them to market. Our biggest long-term goal is to expand the breadth and applications of 3D printing materials to rival the amount used in traditional manufacturing, which is a number in the thousands. We’ve got our work cut out for us.

One of your biggest passions is cooking. What lessons from cooking have you applied to your work?

Well, cooking is all about chemistry: taking things through mixing, processing, and heating to create completely different things. In Indian cooking, the list of ingredients for each dish can sound nearly identical: the same basic spices, the same kinds of vegetables and rice. But the nuance is in the process you use for each one: do you add a certain spice first or last? Is it whole our ground? How long should it simmer? The process has a huge impact on how the dish comes out. So at work I make sure our engineers are very rigorous in documenting their processes in how they fuse things together. It really makes all the difference.

How has being a woman informed your career in a traditionally male-dominated field?

Before I came to HP, I interviewed with a few other companies. Each time, lunchtime would roll around and they’d trot out “The Woman” who worked there to have lunch with me to show me how good their diversity was, which of course wasn’t very convincing at all. Then I came to HP. I didn’t talk to a single woman during my interviews, but as I was walking down the hallways there were women working everywhere: in the labs, on the engineering teams, on the product teams. Nobody went out of their way to try and convince me that HP was a diverse company because I could see it with my own two eyes. As much as anything, that’s what brought me here.

Published: November 09, 2017

 

HP Jet Fusion 32 4200 printersHP Jet Fusion 32 4200 printers

3D printing is one of the most disruptive technologies of our time, spearheading a new 4th Industrial Revolution that will radically change the way we conceive, design, produce, distribute, and consume pretty much everything.

But until now, 3D printing hasn’t been a viable means of large-scale industrial manufacturing (think big factories) because of prohibitively expensive production costs and limited technology. In order to realize HP’s vision of digitally transforming the $12 trillion global manufacturing industry, the economics of 3D printing needed to be completely rewritten.

Today, HP announced that it has smashed that economic barrier and paved the way for cost-effective, industrial-scale 3D manufacturing with the new Jet Fusion 3D 4210 Printing Solution.

The new solution increases production volume for HP Jet Fusion 3D printers by enabling continuous operation, greater overall system efficiency, and the ability handle larger quantities of 3D printing materials, while significantly lowering production costs with reduced pricing on HP’s 3D materials and shared service contracts.

When put together with HP’s industry-leading Multi Jet Fusion technology, those enhancements double the existing “break-even point” at which 3D printing remains cost-effective to an unprecedented 110,000 parts, and drastically reduces the cost-per-part, up to 65% less than other methods.

“The new 3D 4210 Printing Solution enables our customers to mass-produce parts using HP’s Multi Jet Fusion technology for significantly less than other processes, and fully benefit from the economies of scale,” said Ramon Pastor, General Manager of Multi Jet Fusion for HP’s 3D printing business. “HP’s Jet Fusion 3D systems have now reached a technological and economic inflection point that combines the speed, quality, and scalability needed to accelerate manufacturing’s digital industrial revolution.”

Today, HP also announced the further expansion of its industry-first Open Materials Platform, a collaborative development and distribution model where HP and its growing ecosystem of 3D partners work together to drive materials innovation, reduce costs, and create new applications and markets for Multi Jet Fusion technology. There are already over 50 leading companies actively engaged on the platform.Materials companies can use HP’s Materials Development Kit to quickly test compatibility with Jet Fusion printers.Materials companies can use HP’s Materials Development Kit to quickly test compatibility with Jet Fusion printers.

 

It was announced that leading chemical companies Dressler Group and Lubrizol have joined the growing HP 3D partner ecosystem, and also that three new three new engineering-grade 3D printing materials are coming to the open platform: PA 11, PA 12 Glass Beads, and Polypropylene.

The new materials raise the bar on production quality, strength, versatility, and flexibility, but only one of them is going to space (for now).

The new HP 3D High Reusability PA 12 Glass Beads, an innovative new nylon material filled with tiny glass beads, was used to make one of the most complex parts in a specially-designed HP ENVY Zero-Gravity printer developed with NASA that’s being sent to the International Space Station this February. The printer’s output tray needed to be particularly lightweight, watertight, and durable for its journey to space, and 3D printing with PA 12 Glass Beads provided the perfect solution.

HP continues to unlock the economics and technology of 3D manufacturing, with a deeply-engaged network of partners committed to accelerating the digital industrial revolution.

Says Corey Weber, co-founder of leading printing service bureau Forecast 3D, “It has never been more clear to us that HP’s Multi Jet Fusion represents the future of digital manufacturing.”

Published: November 01, 2017

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HP was born on a university campus. Our founders Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard met while attending the Stanford University School of Engineering where Bill’s graduate project, a resistance-capacitance oscillator, became the company’s first product. Even today, HP’s headquarters sits on Stanford University-owned land. Since our founding, HP has been committed to scientific inquiry and a research mindset first formed at Stanford. Higher education is an important part of our DNA. 

 

From community colleges to research universities, the purpose of higher education is to provide knowledge and skills to students, while producing research and scholarship. While these institutions differ in scale, resources, curricula and mission, they share a common set of challenges: student success, academic reputation, operational efficiency, and security and risk management.

 

Today at the EDUCAUSE 2017 Annual Conference in Philadelphia, HP announced our Campus of the Future framework to meet the growing challenges of higher education and break through the frontiers of instructional innovation and research. The strategic framework was created to improve student success, mitigate risk, increase accessibility and enhance teaching, learning and research for institutions across the world.

 

The framework migrates from the device-based approach first used with Gen Xers. Based on learnings from those earlier implementations, the Campus of the Future framework is designed for today’s millennials to encompass maker spaces, virtual reality and design labs, and fabrication facilities. Our goal is to help build a future of next-generation experiences for students while equipping them with technology to pursue their passions – whether it be in particle physics or drama.edu 2.jpg

 

As part of this initiative, I’m pleased to introduce immersive computing applied research at elite universities, and new solutions and procurement technologies specifically suited for higher education institutions.

  

Announcing the HP Applied Research Network: Insights for the Campus of the Future

As part of our applied research with university partners, HP and Yale University released a research report, “A Year in the Blender,” which chronicles the research findings from an interdisciplinary research project at the university. Building on the success of the Yale University Blended Reality research, HP also announced the expansion of applied research on campuses to explore the most effective and impactful use cases in virtual reality, augmented reality and 3D printing. From holographic teleportation to accessibility, elite colleges and universities including Dartmouth College, FIU College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts | Miami Beach Urban Studios, Gallaudet University, Hamilton College, Harrisburg University, Harvard Graduate School of Education, Lehigh University, Syracuse University, University of San Diego, and Yale University will provide direct input into HP’s Campus of the Future architecture.

 

Announcing HP Campus Foundry

EDUCAUSE lists innovative learning spaces as a Top Strategic Technology for 2017 and we absolutely agree. Now, universities can create amazing, immersive and engaging learning spaces powered by HP. Newly announced HP Campus Foundry epitomizes creativity and innovation, combining HP Multi Jet Fusion 3D Printers, HP Indigo digital presses and HP DesignJet large format printers. These technologies enable campuses to fabricate 3D molecules, building prototypes, GIS maps of campus or print custom runs of student dissertations.

 

Announcing HP OMEN eSports Arenas for Higher Education

 

Student Affairs (SA) is an essential function of campus leadership and is focused on helping students develop necessary skill sets, while keeping them engaged in the campus community. eSports is the latest phenomenon engaging the next generation of students. Online gaming is now a televised sport, and campuses all over the world now have intercollegiate eSports teams. HP announced the advanced HP OMEN eSports Arenas to bring gaming to the next level on campus. Whetedu 3.jpgher students are a sponsored gaming pro or a first-year student taking a break from homework, HP OMEN delivers the goods. Universities can give their students pro-level eSports experiences using OMEN PCs and HP designed arenas, and take on rival schools in Overwatch™ or League of Legends™ using state of the art gaming tech designed for universities.

 

Announcing HP2B for Higher Education: an all-new shopping and purchasing experience

HP announced HP2B for Higher Education, an all-new B2B platform developed to minimize purchasing frustration, while enabling the smooth management of campus purchasing. Universities can enjoy a fully-customized online campus purchasing portal, available with punch-out capability, which they manage in the cloud. Custom catalogs, campus standards and purchaser profiles enable an improved experience from procurement to end users. With HP2B’s configurator, faculty and staff can create their own custom models and submit them for approval to their divisional business manager, so that they can discover their next molecule or write their next masterpiece.

 

To learn more about the Campus of the Future framework and HP’s commitment to higher education, visit hp.com/hied.

 

Published: October 06, 2017

Corey Weber Co-Founder, Forecast 3DCorey Weber Co-Founder, Forecast 3D3D printing’s digital industrial revolution is in its early days, but it’s already being embraced across the full spectrum of the manufacturing business from major industries and large enterprises to independent local purveyors known as printing service bureaus.

 

Recently, Forecast 3D, one of the oldest and largest privately-owned service bureaus in the U.S., became the first to offer full-scale 3D manufacturing with the installation of 12 HP 3D printing units.

 

In honor of tomorrow’s Manufacturing Day 2017, Forecast 3D Co-Founder Corey Weber discusses how that capability has transformed his business, and how it foretells a far greater disruption of the global manufacturing industry ahead.

 

 

What does Forecast 3D do?

 

IMG_0899.jpgMy brother Donovan and I started Forecast 3D back in 1994 as a rapid prototyping service bureau. Rapid prototyping is the original term for 3D printing, which back then was just becoming a viable way to quickly make revisions to prototypes of various things. HP’s Multi Jet Fusion has allowed us to use our prototyping prowess to expand into full-scale, end-to-end 3D production, but more on that later.

 

We started the company in a 500 square-foot space down by the beach here in Carlsbad, California with a $5,000 loan from our grandfather. Modest beginnings for sure. But we quickly became known for the high quality of our products and services and grew very fast. Today we have 49,000 square feet of 3D printing goodness using the latest manufacturing technologies to best fit our customers’ needs, including Multi Jet Fusion.

 

How have you seen the 3D printing industry evolve since you began?

It has majorly evolved since I began my career in 1990. I remember working with some of the early technologies and thinking this is junk! But so many of those technologies have since made tremendous advancements that have allowed the industry to grow at an amazing rate, and new technologies like Multi Jet Fusion have taken things to a whole new level with full 3D production. It used to be easy to keep track of everything that was going on, now there’s so much happening that just keeping up can be a full-time job.

 

Why did you decide to make such a big investment in Multi Jet Fusion with the installation of 12 HP 3D printing units?

When you’ve been in this industry as long as I have, you get to know a lot about both the pros and cons of 3D printing. The upsides are potentially limitless, but the main downside, the Achilles Heel that has kept 3D printing from becoming mainstream, has always been slow speed and high costs. HP has removed those shackles with Multi Jet Fusion and made 3D printing faster and more cost-effective than ever before, which opens up a whole new world of opportunities for us. When we first tested HP’s 3D printers a year ago we immediately saw how much they could achieve, and how far they could push the industry forward, so the only thing to do was go big.

 

 

What benefits do you see Multi Jet Fusion having over other types of manufacturing technology?

The speed alone is a tremendous benefit. To go from iterating multiple design cycles with prototypes to final production in one week is unprecedented. Being able to shorten the time-to-market can make a dramatic difference in the success of a product. And even if a product falls flat, the startup capital risk is so low that you can take your learnings and iterate a new, better product for little additional investment, especially important for smaller startups. 

 

The degree of manufacturing flexibility is one of the biggest benefits over conventional manufacturing technology, I strongly believe that once designers start to adopt the out-of-the-box thinking and boundless creativity that Multi Jet Fusion allows, we’ll see some amazing advancements in product design, innovation and performance. The companies that embrace this new mindset early will see a huge competitive advantage.

 

 

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How does being the first service bureau with the capacity for full-run 3D production with Multi Jet Fusion change your business now, and your outlook for the future?

Being the first to have this capacity has changed the way we think about 3D printing entirely. We’ve done small production jobs before, but the time and cost required by existing technologies made it impractical for anything beyond a few hundred parts. But with the installation of 12 Multi Jet Fusion units at our new facility, we now have the capacity to produce 600,000 parts in a single week. That’s the most significant leap that I’ve ever seen in 3D printing: going from prototyping and small batch production to full-run, large-scale 3D manufacturing. It’s drastically expanded the type and range of opportunities we can pursue, and it’s a microcosm for the way 3D printing is going to transform the entire global manufacturing industry.

 

Where do you see the 3D printing industry 5 years from now?

For decades, 3D printing has only been viewed as a viable manufacturing option by a small number of forward-thinking companies. But Multi Jet Fusion has turned that promise into a reality and opened the doors for the industry to grow at mass scale. I predict that in 5 years, 3D printing will already be a primary manufacturing process for at least 25% of companies in the world. Considering the size of the manufacturing industry, that is a mind-boggling amount of growth that will only continue to gain speed.

 

Ultimately, how do you think 3D printing’s transformation of the manufacturing industry will change the global business landscape, and change people’s lives on a personal level.

I think one of the greatest transformations that 3D printing will have on global business will be a push towards local manufacturing. Companies will be able to bring much of their manufacturing home, which will be positive in so many ways, especially in terms of the natural resources it requires to transport mass volumes of products overseas.

 

On a more personal level, kids these days are growing up with 3D printing as a household word, and getting introduced to the concept of computer-aided design at an early age. I think this will start a generational shift where today’s tech-savvy kids will be more inclined to make things rather than simply buy them.  Right now, consumer technology often means just going online to buy stuff. But in the future, I think people will have a less passive relationship with technology and will use it to make more things for themselves, customized to their own personal tastes.

 

I’ve custom-designed and printed many things for myself because they didn’t exist in the form that I needed them, from a cup holder for my ’68 Charger to a tool that cleans the leaves off my tile roof. Multi Jet Fusion gives you the power to create things quickly, at low cost, to the specifications of individual people, from my cup holder to a future with custom-printed shoes, cars, medical devices, household goods, and beyond. The possibilities are truly staggering.

 

Published: September 20, 2017

Refugees at the Dzaleka Refugee Camp using HP technology to immerse themselves in the AppFactory Program.Refugees at the Dzaleka Refugee Camp using HP technology to immerse themselves in the AppFactory Program.

 

By Nate Hurst, Chief Sustainability and Social Impact Officer of HP Inc. and Mary Snapp, Corporate Vice President of Microsoft Philanthropies.

 

 

Malawi, Africa is one of the most underserved nations in the world—over one half of Malawians live on just one dollar per day. Close to 40,000 people currently residing in Malawi are refugees, and 28,000 of them now call the Dzaleka Refugee Camp home after fleeing from genocide and political insecurities in their countries.

One way to empower refugees to break the cycle of poverty is by bridging the digital divide through education—and that’s where HP and Microsoft come in.

As part of the commitment for the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) Connectivity for Refugees program, HP and Microsoft have launched AppFactory, a program to improve the state of software development and bring quality learning, IT skills development and entrepreneurship training to the people living in the Dzaleka. By equipping refugees with technological savvy, they will have the tools needed to succeed in today’s hyper-globalized digital economy beyond Malawi’s borders.

This is the first AppFactory implemented within a refugee community, aimed at building economic and learning opportunities for people in the camp. The program is part of the Microsoft 4Afrika Initiative, through which the company helps provide access to critical skill-building programs on the African continent. Also through 4Afrika, Microsoft is working to provide affordable access to technology, such as the “white spaces” Internet connectivity infrastructure they have built out in and around Dzaleka. HP is providing computing technology to ensure refugee youth living in the Malawi camp have the devices needed to participate in AppFactory.

In addition to providing tools and training, AppFactory includes an internship program to give talented and passionate refugees the chance to cultivate world-class software development skills. Through a hands-on approach, the students will work with real scenarios locally across the Refugee Ambassador community, and will be mentored by fully dedicated, experienced master software craftsmen from the industry. The in-demand IT skills and experience students gain from this program will enable them to pursue careers anywhere on the continent or around the world.

Affordable, accessible Internet is the first step in building a collaborative ecosystem to provide quality learning, health, safety and services to the people residing in Dzaleka. By giving refugees Internet access and the tools to harness the power of technology, they will have the chance to transcend borders and succeed in the global digital economy.