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Published: January 03, 2017

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 At HP, innovation is a cycle of constant reinvention.

New products – whether an upgrade of a previous version or the first in a new brand – are born from an innovation cycle that’s powered by customer insights. Whether that insight comes from researching market trends, studying user habits or responding to other technologies, we’re constantly looking at ways to innovate and make an experience with one of our products better.

This week, during the International Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, we’re putting that innovation cycle into the spotlight with updates to some of our key products, including the 15” HP Spectre x360 laptop and the ENVY Curved 34" All-in-One PC.

While some of the changes we’ve introduced are bold and others are subtle, each update is made for a specific reason and thoughtfully integrated to make an already good experience even better.

 

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The new 15” HP Spectre x360 laptop, announced this week, is an example of that innovation cycle at work. By listening to customers, we knew that 65 percent of them prefer 15-inch displays and that 93 percent prefer the Ultra HD, or 4K, resolution.

 To address and anticipate the needs of customers, we added an NVIDIA 940MX discrete graphics chip that increased the height of the laptop by a mere 1.9mm – or the thickness of a nickel – and included a larger battery, too. We also included the Fast Charge technology that juices the battery to 50 percent in just 30 minutes.

We also know that customers like the freedom that comes with using a stylus pen, so we are using a panel with Ink Certification for N-trig pen to ensure more seamless interactions, whether taking notes, marking up PDFs, drawing or browsing without leaving fingerprints.

Meanwhile, we also reduced the laptop’s overall footprint. With 97 percent of users preferring a thin bezel or no bezel at all, we shifted to a “micro-edge display” design that reduced the bezel width by 70 percent, now only 4.65mm thin on both sides.

Finally, customers told us how much they loved the Ash Silver color on earlier products so the Spectre x360 sports a fully CNC machined aluminum chassis in Ash Silver with copper accents – and made that color an option on a new 13” version, too.

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HP ENVY 34" Curved All-in-One

When it comes to premium all-in-one PCs, we also know a few things about usage and users.

In the home, an all-in-one becomes a focal point in the living room and a digital hub for the family, a place where people store their photos and music and watch movies. That means, for some consumers, it needs to look just as good as it works.20160804_HPI_LA_SCHUMI_SHOT3_391.jpg

The HP ENVY 34-inch Curved All-in-One announced this week does just that, adding a wider curved display and even more improvements to the 27-inch ENVY AIO announced earlier this year.

Because the screen is curved, we were able to taper the edges even more, giving it a near-invisible look. The Micro-Edge border around the display is almost non-existent, just 10.5mm wide on the sides and top and 14mm on the bottom.

And when you consider that the graceful die cast neck almost disappears when its chrome polish meets ambient light, it creates the impression of a floating display.

The display itself is an Ultra WQHD panel with almost 5 million pixels, or 40 percent more than a Full HD display, and a 178-degree viewing angle. According to experts, the blue light emitted from the screen can make viewers more restless at night, so we've included a filter option in the screen controls to reduce it.

But the ENVY 34 Curved AIO is also a PC, and that means customers want the latest technologies and connectivity ports, like the USB Type-C Thunderbolt 3 port that’s been added. 

Pop-up web camera.Pop-up web camera.Even user security is part of the updates. When users told us that they were concerned about webcam security, we designed the HD IR Privacy Camera so that it pops up on a spring mechanism when it’s needed. When it’s no longer needed, the user just presses it down to hide it and make sure no one can spy on them via the camera.

With every product we release, we keep learning and keep innovating so that the experience with HP products gets better every time.

Other updates to the 2016 Premium Holiday portfolio include:

  • The Spectre x360 13.3” now offers 4K display and Intel Iris Graphics options with the added choice Ash Silver with Copper accents. It is also Windows Ink Certified.
  • The HP ENVY 13.3” laptop gives customer the choice of Modern Gold in addition to Silver finishes.
  • The HP ENVY All-in-One 27” now offers 7th Generation Intel® Core™ i processors and a 4K display option.

Reinvention through innovation is the HP way and it ensures that with every new product, the experiences are always getting better.CES_CTA_Combo_Logo_1.jpg

 Get all of HP's news during CES by reading the blog and following the HP Newsroom on Twitter.

    CES Desktop Computing Innovation Mobile Computing
Published: November 02, 2017

reinvent1.jpgToday marks our second anniversary as HP Inc. To celebrate this milestone, and our role as an innovation leader and founder of Silicon Valley, HP has invited thought leaders from organizations as diverse as IDEO, SoundHound Inc. and Wisdom VC to reimagine new possibilities in the way that people design and create, secure and protect, sustain and explore. The ‘Future Powered by Reinvention’ event will showcase technology shaping the future while reinventing the human experience today.  

 

With like-minded creative thinkers, influential visionaries, and business leaders, we’ll spark conversations about the rapid pace of the world around us and how we stay ahead of change to innovate, adapt, reinvent, and engineer experiences for a future that promises to look very different from today. To guide us into the future, we look to major socio-economic, demographic and technological trends occurring across the globe. These "megatrends" will have a sustained, transformative impact on the world in the years ahead and will influencer how we:   

 

Design and create with digital manufacturing. For the last 150 years or so, we’ve approached manufacturing in basically the same centralized way: design in one location, manufacture in a low-cost geography or in large automated facilities, then load goods on container ships and sent around the world. Not a scalable model in a world of rapid growth and urbanization.  

 

Digital manufacturing will drive profound changes in the business landscape. Digitally designed, digitally printed or manufactured on demand for industries including healthcare, consumer goods, automotive, and aerospace. No staging, no warehouses. HP and channel partners are in a unique position with regard to 3D print technology, which is at the heart of this manufacturing transformation. HP’s Multi Jet Fusion—alone among leading 3D contenders—has end-to-end digital capability and a growing range of printable materials is rapidly expanding across manufacturing applications. In five-years, we’ll see an increasing number of parts and objects manufactured in this way, at or near the point of use.   

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Secure and protect with cyber trust and security. Innovation is not the exclusive domain of the good guys. Security threats on the horizon are going to force a fundamental change in the way we approach development and design, driving a need for cyber security into places you’d never expect to need it. It’s at the cellular level, literally, when we are looking at hacked pacemakers and the ability to edit DNA.  

 

It’s our responsibility as technologists, and as humans, to focus on security and on how we can get to a new model for a safer future. Cyber-resiliency is a proactive security concept that, much like a healthy immune system provides a barrier against disease, would start with barriers to intrusion. Beyond that, the focus is on immediate detection and auto-response to isolate and neutralize the threat, extract it and come back to a known state. Cyber-resilient design is already fundamental to building the world’s most advanced security into HP’s current personal systems and printers.  

 

Sustain and explore with AI and machine learning. The notion of artificial intelligence is hardly new; our industry has been pursuing the potential of AI for almost 40 years. We're now at a point where the algorithms, compute capabilities, and exponentially increasing flow of data are turning the AI vision into reality. We’re at the tip of the iceberg with big data—collecting immense amounts of information, and using advanced analytics to sift through and find insights.  

 

Where AI will gain game-changing traction, however, is in the rise of machine learning. Machine learning helps AI to actually digest that data: identifying patterns that help us see meaning. Early AI applications are arriving in the form of bots, already in customer service engines, and collecting information to continuously refine their performance.    machine.jpg

 

In education, we’ll see commercial virtual reality, but also learning analytics and adaptive learning based on AI; in healthcare, we’ll see chatbots, virtual assistants, and bionics that use AI; and in aerospace, we’ll see exploring robots and space probes that will go where no man has been before.  

 

The ‘Future Powered by Reinvention’  

At our headquarters in Palo Alto, we’ll offer a unique tour of HP’s labs and bring together visionaries working on what's next. In addition to megatrends, a compelling experiential event will highlight HP breakthrough innovation from our labs focused on immersive experiences, 3D, and emerging compute including virtual and augmented reality, 3D printing and artificial intelligence.  

 

A panel, moderated by Fast Company, will spotlight the most important technologies influencing the human experience today—and which ones will be most important the next five to ten years. Panellists include David Webster, Head of Product and Technology at IDEO, Josh Kauffman, Founder of Wisdom VC, Rachel Sibley, Futurist, Kathleen McMahon, VP and GM, SoundHound and Chandrakant Patel, HP Senior Fellow and Chief Engineer.

 

More on today’s news and event can be found here.

 

Published: October 20, 2017

A speculative wearable device ‘Data Vaporizer’A speculative wearable device ‘Data Vaporizer’In a guest lecture to students, faculty, and interested members of the public on October 26th at the California College of the Arts in San Francisco, HP Labs researcher Ji Won Jun will argue the case for “Design as a Speculative Inquiry.”HP Labs researcher Ji Won JunHP Labs researcher Ji Won Jun

“I’m going to be sharing some examples of my work to show how we can use design to think more creatively about the future and think about technology in a different way,” Jun says.

Too often, Jun believes, we view the likely impact of new technologies either in terms of solving problems with existing tools or through a fantastical lens more suited to science fiction.

“Speculative Design is about challenging our assumptions about why and how we should advance technology,” she notes. “Maybe our aim shouldn’t always be to do things faster or be more productive but instead be more about things like, say, protecting our privacy.”

One of Jun’s early projects – the Data Vaporizer – is a wearable device that does just that by offering protection from hackers. A more recent investigation for the Immersive Experiences Lab, Project Jetty, explores how we can foster stronger emotional connections between people without explicitly needing to make contact with each other.

“The point is to tweak the questions we ask ourselves and, in doing that, to provoke an alternative approach,” Jun suggests. “We’re creating prototype designs that we can share with people and, in measuring their responses to those designs, learn more about what might change as we get people to see technology in a new light.”

Jun’s lecture is part of the California College of the Arts’ annual open house for its MFA program in Design and will feature projects drawn from her own MFA studies at the Art Center College of Design in Pasadena, California and her work in HP’s Immersive Experiences Lab, which she joined in early 2016.

Previously, Jun has presented her work at the 2017 Research Through Design Conference in Edinburgh, UK, and seen it featured in media including Fast Company, Vice magazine’s Creators project and ACM Interactions magazine. She also won the 2016 SXSW Interactive Innovation Award for Student Innovation and received an Art Center Graduate Honors Fellowship.

Jun’s lecture is on Thursday, October 26th at 7:30 PM in the Boardroom at the California College of the Arts (CCA) in San Francisco.

Published: October 20, 2017

HP Labs researcher Sarthak GhoshHP Labs researcher Sarthak Ghosh“In the future, people are going to spend a lot of time in virtual reality environments,” suggests HP Labs researcher Sarthak Ghosh. And they won’t just be using VR for entertainment. “VR will also become a key tool for employees working in fields as diverse as engineering, healthcare, media production, and space science,” Ghosh says.

That begs a question Ghosh first tackled while interning at HP Labs in 2016 as a masters student in Human Computer Interaction at Georgia Tech: how can we ensure that people working in VR environments keep track of what’s going on in the real world, of having a sense of passing time for example?

“If you are making a VR game, you don’t mind if your users are so engrossed in it that they lose track of time,” Ghosh observes. “But if you want people to use VR to do a job, they also need to attend meetings, write up reports, talk with colleagues and more.”

One solution would be to put a real time clock in the VR display that users see. But that takes up valuable visual real estate and taxes a human sense – vision – that is already being worked hard in such a visually immersive environment.

Instead, Ghosh decided to explore using haptic feedback – creating physical sensations with small motors – to offer clues about what’s going on outside the VR experience. Traditionally, haptic feedback has been deployed to make VR feel even more immersive. But could different types of haptic feedback also strengthen our feelings of connection to the outside world?

To find out, Ghosh built a series of five ‘haptic backpacks’ to be worn along with a VR headset. Inspired by HP’s own Omen VR Backpack, which makes it possible to create “untethered” VR experiences, each of these backpacks was augmented to deliver a different kind of physical nudge to users immersed in a virtual reality task. One backpack created the sensation of a shoulder tap at regular intervals to mark the passage of real world time, another buzzed at the shoulder, while a third buzzed the entire back. The fourth backpack created a “hugging” sensation and the final pack used small fans to blow air across the wearer’s neck.

Trials on colleagues in HP’s Immersive Experiences Lab quickly revealed that the hugging and blown air solutions didn’t give clear enough external signals. But the first three showed promise. Ghosh led efforts to test these other forms of haptic feedback on a larger group of participants as they undertook two different VR tasks.

“Perhaps our main finding was that people did notice the alerts they were getting and for the most part they were able to connect that with the real world, so it does seem possible to use your body’s surface area to create notifications about the real world,” says Ghosh.

The study also revealed a discrepancy between the intellectual calculations people make as they count buzzes or taps to measure time and their instinctual sense of how much time has passed. Many felt more inclined to believe their less reliable instincts over their more accurate counts, offering a useful window on the dominance of our instinctual sense of time in VR environments.

In addition, participants reported a strong inclination to believe that the physical sensations they were experiencing had a significance in the virtual world.Alex Thayer, Chief Experience Architect for the Immersive Experiences LabAlex Thayer, Chief Experience Architect for the Immersive Experiences Lab

“If we can get a better handle on all of these things, it could help make for a better VR experience itself as well as letting us send clearer signals from the outside,” notes Alex Thayer, Chief Experience Architect for the Immersive Experiences Lab. 

On the issue of external notifications, the study suggested multiple areas for further analysis, such as the best patterns to use for signaling and the degree to which priming participants with information about what to expect can impact outcomes.

After completing his initial research, Ghosh returned to Georgia Tech to finish his degree. The work on his thesis with adviser Gregory Abowd was inspired by the HP Labs study. On graduation, Ghosh was hired into HP Labs as a full time researcher in the Immersive Experiences Lab so he could continue his explorations.

“One of our next steps is to ask how we can apply what we’re learning in these studies to future iterations of VR interaction and design,” Ghosh says.

That will help HP’s Immersive Experiences Lab further its goal of helping people achieve “supernatural productivity” – productivity far beyond what’s currently possible.

“We see VR as one of the technologies most likely to both disrupt and enhance how professionals do their work in the next five or ten years,” adds Thayer. “Research like this helps us anticipate that moment by enriching our understanding of what it will take to have VR be a major part of our work lives.”

Addendum - The haptic backpack project was a collaborative effort with other members of the Immersive Experiences Lab, including Hiro Horii, Kevin Smathers, and Mithra Vankipuram.

Published: October 12, 2017

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Gift, create, share, and relive moments for the snappiest holiday season ever.

 

It’s nearly here. The ceremonies and celebrations, parties and gifts, generations-old and inaugural traditions alike. Just in time for the holiday season, new HP Sprocket family products help everyone to celebrate and share the story of their revelries.

 

Family.pngToday, HP announced its new lifestyle photo category including an expansion of its HP Sprocket product line. Headlining the announcement is the HP Sprocket 2-in-1, the newest evolution in the popular Sprocket line-up, which combines a pocket-sized photo printer with a built-in instant camera to capture every fun and memorable experience with friends and family. The 2-in-1 offers an entertaining, center-of-the-party way to capture moments on the spot, unlock photos from your smartphone and social media, relive favorite memories, or print and share them instantly.

  

“Our research tells us that teens and young adults love stylish gadgets that enhance social events by contributing a fun, new element and bringing people closer together.” Anneliese Olson, General Manager and Global Head of Home Printing Solutions at HP, said. “In a world where we click what we like and print what we love, print is alive and thriving, especially when it comes to photography. We are meeting the cultural shift back to the tangible things in life with our lifestyle photography lineup—enabling people to capture and share life’s important moments.”

The Sprocket 2-in-1 makes its debut at the Vogue’s Forces of Fashion event in New York City today, where creatives, designers and photographers will get their hands on it, enabling them to capture the days’ most fashionable moments.

Innovation throughout

Extending the award-winning Sprocket design, the 2-in-1 is the perfect gift: small and light enough to fit in a purse or pocket, it produces stunning 2x3” stick-able snapshots or social media photos in less than a minute. Also announced today is the Sprocket Plus, which offers 30% larger photos so it’s easier to include everyone, with the biggest photos and thinnest design ever from a Sprocket, and on the market today.

The free to download, quick-and-easy HP Sprocket App for iOS and Android lets users easily print their photos with simple two-tap process: select a photo and print a photo. That’s it! To get more creative, personalize photos with frames, emojis, text, stickers, filters, and more. Connect social media accounts to the HP Sprocket App and instantly turn any of those photos into colorful prints, too. The HP Sprocket App continues to deliver innovative features like a photobooth mode for those silly moments with friends, getting creative with a tile print, and even incorporate your own hand-drawn stickers into the app. Whether you are looking for a simple print or bringing your creative A game, the HP Sprocket App delivers.

With today’s announcements, and across the entire Sprocket product family, HP has also updated the mobile experience to incorporate augmented reality technology (AR) in ways that help everyone tell deeper stories that bring to life Sprocket prints. With the “Relive Memories” feature, users can simply scan a photo via the Sprocket app and it automatically attaches to a video—from your phone or social media feed related to that photo—that plays magically in AR on the photo. To help share a richer story, swipe once to instantly see all the photos from that location or date, then swipe again to unlock content about the locale. Suddenly, Sprocket pictures become a celebration of the whole moment.

The prints are still produced using ZINK Zero Ink™ Technology, which means all the color required for printing is embedded in the HP photo paper itself. It delivers ready-to-share snaps that are sticky-backed, smudge-proof, and water- and tear-resistant.

Personalize and enhance

Not only a perfect gift, Sprocket products are a must-have holiday party centerpiece to capture, share, and extend the fun. They are also ideal for making special gifts for family and friends. From a year-in-review sccollage.pngrapbook, custom holiday cards, wall displays, or photo desk accessories, the printing experts at HP have you covered. With any of the Sprocket products, photos become instant stickers when the backing is peeled off, for immediate decorating of journals, walls, lockers, ornaments, gift tags, and more.

HP is also offering an expanded portfolio of colors with premium designs, as well as a suite of fashionable accessories for the Sprocket lineup, from sleeves and wallets, to cool decorations to showcase photo creations, to albums and journals to commemorate special events.

To learn more about the expanded HP Sprocket family and get details about product pricing, colors and availability, visit http://www8.hp.com/us/en/printers/sprocket.html.

 

Published: October 10, 2017

From left: HP Labs researchers Adrian Baldwin and Jonathan GriffinFrom left: HP Labs researchers Adrian Baldwin and Jonathan GriffinHP Connection Inspector, a new intelligent embedded security feature for enterprise printers developed at HP Labs, helps networked HP printers stay one step ahead of malware attacks by giving them advanced self-healing capabilities.

Announced at this month’s HP World Partner Forum in Chicago, HP Connection Inspector was developed specifically for enterprise printers, notes Adrian Baldwin, one of the Bristol, UK-based researchers behind the innovation.

“A lot of security technology that gets put into printers simply copies what is put into PCs,” he says. “HP Connection Inspector has been developed from the outset with the mechanics of how printers work – and the needs of printer users – in mind.”

Malicious actors are constantly looking for less-protected gateways into an enterprise’s larger IT network. To prevent networked printers becoming that conduit, the HP Security Lab team focused on developing a novel approach to network traffic monitoring designed to detect threats and enable immediate responses.

Where many malware detectors need to refer to libraries of known hostile programs or network addresses known to be associated with an attack, HP Connection Inspector focuses on detecting anomalous behaviors and then acts to secure the networked printer even before the malware is confirmed to be present.

It does this by keeping a continuous watch for moments when malware is attempting to make contact with its command and control server. In the process, HP Connection Inspector learns what “normal” network traffic looks like, meaning that it can detect suspicious outbound requests even when those requests aren’t sent to known “bad” web addresses. When it detects suspicious activity, the software can immediately go into a protected mode, stopping any further unfamiliar requests and sending a warning to IT administrators.

“One thing that’s hard about doing this is avoiding false alarms,” says Baldwin. “We do that by restricting what the printer is allowed to do if we get suspicious, but not stopping it completely until we know that we need to – that makes the solution much more reliable than usual.”

When HP Connection Inspector detects a specific, customer-determined level of malware-like behavior, the technology can also trigger a printer reboot. This initiates a self-healing procedure without IT needing to be involved. 

“Printers need to be on all the time,” adds project manager Jonathan Griffin. “By automatically rebooting the computer, printers aren’t idled while waiting for IT support; that also helps reduce down time, which is a high priority for all enterprise print users.”

In addition, these capabilities had to be developed as elegantly as possible, to ensure they would provide security without interfering with overall printing or networking performance.

“A lot of research went into creating this, but we’re quite pleased with how little space the final code actually takes up,” Baldwin notes.  

After developing the technology behind HP Connection Inspector, the HP Labs team worked extensively with colleagues from HP’s Office Printing Solutions group in Bangalore, India and Boise, Idaho to ready the solution for commercial use. It is now set to be included in all HP Enterprise LaserJet printers by the end of this year.

HP Connection Inspector is just the first of a number of printer-specific security analytics innovations the HP Labs team is developing to help detect and respond to malware attacks.