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Published: November 19, 2016
 

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With so many science and engineering professionals emerging from India, it’s easy to forget that much of the country is trying to bring quality education to millions of students in rural areas.

    Education Sustainability
Published: November 01, 2017

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HP was born on a university campus. Our founders Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard met while attending the Stanford University School of Engineering where Bill’s graduate project, a resistance-capacitance oscillator, became the company’s first product. Even today, HP’s headquarters sits on Stanford University-owned land. Since our founding, HP has been committed to scientific inquiry and a research mindset first formed at Stanford. Higher education is an important part of our DNA. 

 

From community colleges to research universities, the purpose of higher education is to provide knowledge and skills to students, while producing research and scholarship. While these institutions differ in scale, resources, curricula and mission, they share a common set of challenges: student success, academic reputation, operational efficiency, and security and risk management.

 

Today at the EDUCAUSE 2017 Annual Conference in Philadelphia, HP announced our Campus of the Future framework to meet the growing challenges of higher education and break through the frontiers of instructional innovation and research. The strategic framework was created to improve student success, mitigate risk, increase accessibility and enhance teaching, learning and research for institutions across the world.

 

The framework migrates from the device-based approach first used with Gen Xers. Based on learnings from those earlier implementations, the Campus of the Future framework is designed for today’s millennials to encompass maker spaces, virtual reality and design labs, and fabrication facilities. Our goal is to help build a future of next-generation experiences for students while equipping them with technology to pursue their passions – whether it be in particle physics or drama.edu 2.jpg

 

As part of this initiative, I’m pleased to introduce immersive computing applied research at elite universities, and new solutions and procurement technologies specifically suited for higher education institutions.

  

Announcing the HP Applied Research Network: Insights for the Campus of the Future

As part of our applied research with university partners, HP and Yale University released a research report, “A Year in the Blender,” which chronicles the research findings from an interdisciplinary research project at the university. Building on the success of the Yale University Blended Reality research, HP also announced the expansion of applied research on campuses to explore the most effective and impactful use cases in virtual reality, augmented reality and 3D printing. From holographic teleportation to accessibility, elite colleges and universities including Dartmouth College, FIU College of Communication, Architecture + The Arts | Miami Beach Urban Studios, Gallaudet University, Hamilton College, Harrisburg University, Harvard Graduate School of Education, Lehigh University, Syracuse University, University of San Diego, and Yale University will provide direct input into HP’s Campus of the Future architecture.

 

Announcing HP Campus Foundry

EDUCAUSE lists innovative learning spaces as a Top Strategic Technology for 2017 and we absolutely agree. Now, universities can create amazing, immersive and engaging learning spaces powered by HP. Newly announced HP Campus Foundry epitomizes creativity and innovation, combining HP Multi Jet Fusion 3D Printers, HP Indigo digital presses and HP DesignJet large format printers. These technologies enable campuses to fabricate 3D molecules, building prototypes, GIS maps of campus or print custom runs of student dissertations.

 

Announcing HP OMEN eSports Arenas for Higher Education

 

Student Affairs (SA) is an essential function of campus leadership and is focused on helping students develop necessary skill sets, while keeping them engaged in the campus community. eSports is the latest phenomenon engaging the next generation of students. Online gaming is now a televised sport, and campuses all over the world now have intercollegiate eSports teams. HP announced the advanced HP OMEN eSports Arenas to bring gaming to the next level on campus. Whetedu 3.jpgher students are a sponsored gaming pro or a first-year student taking a break from homework, HP OMEN delivers the goods. Universities can give their students pro-level eSports experiences using OMEN PCs and HP designed arenas, and take on rival schools in Overwatch™ or League of Legends™ using state of the art gaming tech designed for universities.

 

Announcing HP2B for Higher Education: an all-new shopping and purchasing experience

HP announced HP2B for Higher Education, an all-new B2B platform developed to minimize purchasing frustration, while enabling the smooth management of campus purchasing. Universities can enjoy a fully-customized online campus purchasing portal, available with punch-out capability, which they manage in the cloud. Custom catalogs, campus standards and purchaser profiles enable an improved experience from procurement to end users. With HP2B’s configurator, faculty and staff can create their own custom models and submit them for approval to their divisional business manager, so that they can discover their next molecule or write their next masterpiece.

 

To learn more about the Campus of the Future framework and HP’s commitment to higher education, visit hp.com/hied.

 

Published: September 20, 2017

Refugees at the Dzaleka Refugee Camp using HP technology to immerse themselves in the AppFactory Program.Refugees at the Dzaleka Refugee Camp using HP technology to immerse themselves in the AppFactory Program.

 

By Nate Hurst, Chief Sustainability and Social Impact Officer of HP Inc. and Mary Snapp, Corporate Vice President of Microsoft Philanthropies.

 

 

Malawi, Africa is one of the most underserved nations in the world—over one half of Malawians live on just one dollar per day. Close to 40,000 people currently residing in Malawi are refugees, and 28,000 of them now call the Dzaleka Refugee Camp home after fleeing from genocide and political insecurities in their countries.

One way to empower refugees to break the cycle of poverty is by bridging the digital divide through education—and that’s where HP and Microsoft come in.

As part of the commitment for the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) Connectivity for Refugees program, HP and Microsoft have launched AppFactory, a program to improve the state of software development and bring quality learning, IT skills development and entrepreneurship training to the people living in the Dzaleka. By equipping refugees with technological savvy, they will have the tools needed to succeed in today’s hyper-globalized digital economy beyond Malawi’s borders.

This is the first AppFactory implemented within a refugee community, aimed at building economic and learning opportunities for people in the camp. The program is part of the Microsoft 4Afrika Initiative, through which the company helps provide access to critical skill-building programs on the African continent. Also through 4Afrika, Microsoft is working to provide affordable access to technology, such as the “white spaces” Internet connectivity infrastructure they have built out in and around Dzaleka. HP is providing computing technology to ensure refugee youth living in the Malawi camp have the devices needed to participate in AppFactory.

In addition to providing tools and training, AppFactory includes an internship program to give talented and passionate refugees the chance to cultivate world-class software development skills. Through a hands-on approach, the students will work with real scenarios locally across the Refugee Ambassador community, and will be mentored by fully dedicated, experienced master software craftsmen from the industry. The in-demand IT skills and experience students gain from this program will enable them to pursue careers anywhere on the continent or around the world.

Affordable, accessible Internet is the first step in building a collaborative ecosystem to provide quality learning, health, safety and services to the people residing in Dzaleka. By giving refugees Internet access and the tools to harness the power of technology, they will have the chance to transcend borders and succeed in the global digital economy.

 

Published: June 26, 2017

Some of the 3D printed designs created by students of KiraKira3D's  curricula.Some of the 3D printed designs created by students of KiraKira3D's curricula.

 Anybody who’s encountered a middle- or high-schooler studying math or science has heard this frustrating complaint: “When am I going to use this in real life?” 

KiraKira3D Founder and CEO Suz SomersallKiraKira3D Founder and CEO Suz SomersallIt’s the very same question that Suz Somersall, CEO and Founder of KiraKira3D, had as an aspiring engineering student at Brown University, where she found the materials for learning mechanical engineering software utilitarian, lacking context and mostly geared toward men. She was turned off by lesson plans for creating hand tools, auto parts and gears, she said, objects that didn’t seem to further her ambitions to be an artist and designer.

“I wanted to study engineering, but the content offered in the intro classes wasn’t very compelling,” she said. “What I wanted was to be inspired to be creative.”

It’s one of the reasons Somersall started KiraKira Academy, which aims to close the gender gap in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) by teaching students the technical skills needed to create virtual and physical products using computer aided design (CAD) software.

KiraKira3D said this week it’s working with HP to produce a new series of approachable, video-based lessons to teach 3D design skills using the Sprout Pro by HP 3D scanning and printing platform.

Students who create 3D objects via software tools can get their designs printed on HP Multi Jet Fusion printers and shipped to them by HP 3D print partner Shapeways.

The goal is to help get more STEAM (science, technology engineering, art and design, and math) curricula into classrooms, so that students—especially girls—can master 3D design, modeling and printing skills through project-based learning.  

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“3D printers and 3D scanners are really incredible tools for STEAM education, but we have to get this into classrooms at a really early age otherwise we miss the opportunity for engagement,” Somersall said. “We are trying to have a range of class content so nobody feels excluded.”

KiraKira3D learners can create a variety of things, including space-inspired decor, sunglasses, household objects, tabletop games, and through the company’s “fashioneer” series, designer jewelry. The video lessons—most of which feature female instructors who are engineers, animators, designers, architects and computer scientists—teach basics in Autodesk TinkerCAD and Maya, Fusion 360, Solidworks, Rhino 3D and other design, animation and 3D modeling software.

“Our instructors lead students through a creative process with design thinking, and produce something really compelling at the end of the lesson,” Somersall said. “We are trying to blend art and engineering skills while also getting the students comfortable with making mistakes or going off on their own and put their own twist on a design.”

The customization possibilities makes KiraKira3D’s approach a good fit for Sprout Pro by HP, which is uniquely suited for education, tinkering and experimentation. Dubbed an Immersive Computing platform, Sprout Pro blurs the barriers between the physical and digital worlds by way of a fully-functional PC and built-in cameras and projectors that enable 2D and 3D scanning and image manipulation – right from the desktop.Second-generation Sprout Pro by HPSecond-generation Sprout Pro by HP

 “HP’s collaboration with KiraKira3D will bring new learning opportunities to millions of students with a special emphasis on inspiring women and girls to engage in STEM-related activities,” said Gus Schmedlen, vice president of education at HP. “KiraKira3D’s instructional videos and hands-on experiences using the latest HP Immersive and Multi Jet Fusion Technologies will empower students to master the skills needed for the jobs of the future.”

HP and KiraKira3D are developing a series of 10 video lessons for Sprout Pro by HP that are set to be available for free next month on KiraKira3D.com.

KiraKira3D and HP share a common vision for 3D printing and see its potential to disrupt manufacturing, retail and ushers in an era of consumer customization.

“Democratizing access to these types of skills is increasingly important as 3D printing becomes more ubiquitous,” Somersall said. “We are really excited to see the things our students will create.”

Published: May 11, 2017

C_j_NJaXkAEKfBA.jpgAs we continue to reinvent our products, business models and supply chain at HP, we are building a legacy of sustainable design. We are reducing our environmental impact, and leading by example to create a more efficient, circular and low carbon economy.

HP has released additional products that reduce energy consumption, designed desktop solutions using less materials, and shifted to service models that lower environmental impact. We’ve committed to reducing greenhouse gas emissions, brought greater transparency about recycling practices to our product supply chain, and more.

Our sustainability efforts aren’t just getting noticed – they’re being applauded by renowned organizations.

 

Earning climate kudos

Our sustainability strategy supports 16 of the 17 UN Sustainable Development Goals, propelling our continued innovation in supply chain responsibility, circular economy integration, and empowerment for migrant workers, refugees and underserved populations. 

HP is being recognized for our relentless dedication to these initiatives tonight at the 33rd annual World Environment Center (WEC) Awards at the Newseum in Washington, D.C. HP Chief Supply Chain Officer Stuart Pann will accept the Gold Medal for International Corporate Achievement in Sustainable Development on behalf of HP, and will be introduced on stage by HP Board Member Aida Alvarez. WEC is a non-profit dedicated to creating environmentally conscious business solutions, and their annual award is one of the most prestigious forms of recognition for global companies and sustainability practices. 

“We are honored to be recognized by the World Environment Center for our ongoing commitment to reduce the environmental impact of our operations, supply chain and products—and to empower individuals and From left to right: Head of Americas Government Relations at HP Randy Dove, Environmental Program Manager, Americas Sustainability at HP Gabriele Peterschmidt and Jonathan Passe, from EPA ENERGY STAR.From left to right: Head of Americas Government Relations at HP Randy Dove, Environmental Program Manager, Americas Sustainability at HP Gabriele Peterschmidt and Jonathan Passe, from EPA ENERGY STAR.communities everywhere. Our commitment to sustainability is based on our company values and is core to our business,” Pann said of the award.

Designing for energy efficient excellence

Significant achievements expand beyond just the WEC Gold Medal Award. ENERGY STAR®, a U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) program that helps businesses and individuals save money while protecting our climate through superior energy efficiency, awarded HP with its 2017 Excellence in Energy-Efficient Product Design award last month.

The EPA introduced the ENERGY STAR program in 1992 to help identify and promote energy-efficient products to reduce greenhouse emissions. ENERGY STAR recognized that HP’s ability to deliver significant advancements in printer efficiency and consumer choice goes above and beyond the norm.

Our key product design accomplishments that received accolades include: securing enormous savings in enterprise printing through HP PageWide Technology business printers that use up to 71 percent less energy than comparable laser printers; and committing to designing products that deliver greater energy efficiency, performance and value. Since 2010, HP has reduced energy consumption of its personal computing system portfolio by 25 percent, its HP LaserJet portfolio by 56 percent, and its HP inkjet portfolio by 20 percent on average. Learn more about the award here.

 

Steering the sustainability conversation

HP recently ranked number one in PCs, printing and printer ink on the Walmart sustainability scorecard. Seeking to learn more about our stance on sustainability, Walmart invited HP’s President of the Americas Christoph Schell to participate in a Leadership Listening Session at the company’s Annual Sustainability Milestone Summit last month. 

Gigaton logo.pngDuring the plenary session, Schell and Walmart’s Senior Vice President of Merchandising Greg Hall took to the main stage to discuss how companies can develop energy-efficient products, with Schell highlighting the HP DeskJet 3752 all-in-one printer, which consumes 30 percent less energy while in sleep mode.

That same day, Walmart boldly announced its goal to work with suppliers to eliminate a gigaton of greenhouse gas emissions in their supply chain by 2030. The target, known as Project Gigaton, equates to taking 211 million passenger vehicles off the road for an entire year. HP has publically committed to support this initiative.

To learn more about HP's Sustainability efforts, visit: hp.com/sustainability and follow @HPSustainable on Twitter.

Published: May 05, 2017

Sprout Pro by HPSprout Pro by HP

 Educators and policy-makers know that personal technology and broadband access are game-changers when it comes to improving outcomes for students – but far too many of the schools they attend lack the resources to provide them. 

But for students who face significant challenges in their home lives, access to technology inside the classroom can help bridge the digital divide.

It’s one of the reasons why HP, a longtime-player in education technology, announced today it will launch a long-term HP Chromebook x360 Education EditionHP Chromebook x360 Education Editiontechnology partnership with the Graham School, a program of the nonprofit Graham Windham.

HP is gifting each of the students and their teachers with top-of-the-line HP Chromebook x360 Education Edition convertible laptops and outfitting the school’s basement into a 21st Century “maker” lab with an HP Learning Studio that features a Dremel 3D printer and the innovative Sprout Pro by HP immersive workstation.

These technologies will not only help teachers improve their skills, gain time back in the classroom and draw from a wider variety of teaching tools, it’s also set to benefit the students who need the most support: the 300 at-risk students from socio-economically challenged neighborhoods the New York City metropolitan area and often have huge gaps in their education due to poverty, addiction, foster care and other hardships.  

“By empowering every student and teacher with personal technology, it opens up a new possibilities for collaboration and skill-building for the future,” said Gus Schmedlen, head of HP’s education vertical. “They will be entering a workforce where to be successful, they’ll need to work collaboratively and be able to transition from the analog to the digital worlds seamlessly. This gift aims to shrink the achievement gap and offer opportunities to come out of school with these skills in hand.”

 Moving the project forward

The donation from HP isn’t just a corporate “feel-good” moment for the Administrators and officials from the Graham School  and Greenburgh-Graham Union Free School District gathering to mark HP's technology gift.Administrators and officials from the Graham School and Greenburgh-Graham Union Free School District gathering to mark HP's technology gift.company and the brand – HP is in it for the long haul. It has partnered with Hewlett-Packard Enterprise, MRA, Intel and Digital Promise to ensure the success of the tech overhaul, including offering change management consulting, professional development and training, and ongoing support.

“They are going from a technology drought to a very rich, collaborative environment,” Schmedlen said. “This is a long-term relationship for HP.”

HP, in turn, will study the effects of the technology interventions with a rigorous longitudinal study that aims to track and report how student performance changes over time, and also determine if there are school-wide lifts in standardized test scores, graduation rates, college acceptances and other measurable improvements.

“Because each student will have a digital footprint, we can collect evidence and learn where they are strong and where they might need more help,” Schmedlen said. “By going from analog learning to digital, we can use data to create predictive intelligence to improve student outcomes.”

 

The Graham SchoolThe Graham SchoolThe Hamilton connection

HP’s technology donation was the result of outreach by Graham Windham Leadership Council Honorary Chair Luis Miranda Jr. to HP Chief Marketing Officer Antonio Lucio.

“I have seen a lot of corporate donations, but this is different,” Miranda said. “The HP team has created an implementation plan that will upgrade the school’s infrastructure to support the new technology, train teachers in the software, and develop metrics that will be measured over time, in addition to the donation of the most up-to-date tech. What I see from these efforts is that HP feels that Graham Windham has as much to teach them as they have to teach the school.”

Miranda became an active supporter of Graham Windham following the strong partnership developed with the organization by his son, composer and actor Lin-Manuel Miranda and the cast of his Broadway mega-hit, Hamilton: An American Musical

“My hope is that one day the Graham Windham programs will not be in such need as they are now, but until then, I look forward to seeing children thrive in the program through the loving care and guidance of the teachers there, and supported by efforts of corporations like HP,” Miranda said.

In 1805, Eliza Hamilton established Graham Windham as the first private orphanage in New York City in honor of her husband, Alexander Hamilton.

“We are extremely pleased to partner with Graham Windham to help reinvent the classroom and keep Eliza Hamilton’s legacy alive,” said Lucio. “Education is a strategic and special market for HP.  By studying the unique needs of students, teachers and administrators, we design education technology solutions to help schools enable the next generation of inventors, leaders, and artists. We are so grateful for this partnership with the Miranda family.”