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Published: May 22, 2017

 

HP Jet Fusion 4200HP Jet Fusion 4200

One year and three days after announcing the world’s first production-ready 3D printing solutions, HP’s Multi Jet Fusion technology and its implementation was crowned “Innovation of the Year” at the inaugural 3D Printing Industry Awards ceremony in London.

Nominated and voted on by the industry – in a program that included more than 800 companies nominated and 200,000 votes received – the awards recognize the individuals, companies and technologies that are shaping the digital reinvention of manufacturing. 

Ramon Pastor, head of HP Multi Jet Fusion technology and Emilio Juarez, head of 3D Printing European sales.Ramon Pastor, head of HP Multi Jet Fusion technology and Emilio Juarez, head of 3D Printing European sales.“The ‘Innovation of the Year’ recognition is a direct result of a trifecta of attributes that differentiates HP and reinforces our position as a catalyst in 3D printing: disruptive technology, the HP Open Platform for materials, and an extensive heritage of printing leadership,” said Ramon Pastor, vice president and general manager, HP Multi Jet Fusion. “We have seen more progress in 3D printing in the past year than in the previous 20 years combined and our team at HP is leading that innovation.”

The award builds on momentum the HP 3D printing business has established over the last 12 months, including:

  • Customers are adopting HP Multi Jet Fusion products. HP began shipping the HP Jet Fusion 3D 4200 last quarter and are quickly ramping the delivery of HP Jet Fusion 3D solutions to meet rising customer demand. HP also unveiled its new HP Partner First 3D Printing Specialization program with more than 30 hand-selected, trained and certified partners, and is opening more than a dozen new HP 3D Printing Reference and Experience Centers across the U.S. and Europe.
  • The global 3D printing ecosystem is growing. HP has forged relationships with key partners, including BMW Group, Jabil, Johnson & Johnson and Nike. In March of this year, HP also announced the world’s first Open Materials and Applications Lab in Corvallis, Oregon, where partners including Arkema, BASF, Evonik, Henkel and Lehman & Voss are innovating new 3D materials using HP’s Open Platform.
  • Access to production-ready 3D printing capabilities is increasing. HP is working with more than a dozen service bureaus and product design firms to bring HP Multi Jet Fusion and the benefits associated with production-grade technologies to a much larger range of users. These industry leaders such as Fast Radius, Forecast3D, Go Proto, Materialise, ProtoCam, Proto Labs, Shapeways, SigmaDesign and 3D Prod are selecting and installing HP 3D Printing systems to offer their own end-customers the opportunity to design and create production quality 3D printed parts. 

“The industry spoke loud and clear voting HP Multi Jet Fusion as the runaway favorite for the inaugural ‘Innovation of the Year’ award,” said Michael Petch, editor, 3DPrintingIndustry.com. “With the results, our readers recognize that HP is delivering on its promise to disrupt 3D printing and the overall manufacturing sector. The Multi Jet Fusion platform and HP Open Platform are driving innovation and have had an immediate impact for customers and partners.”Badge Winner White.png

For more information about the latest from HP’s 3D printing business, see its recent announcement here.

    3D Printing
Published: October 06, 2017

Corey Weber Co-Founder, Forecast 3DCorey Weber Co-Founder, Forecast 3D3D printing’s digital industrial revolution is in its early days, but it’s already being embraced across the full spectrum of the manufacturing business from major industries and large enterprises to independent local purveyors known as printing service bureaus.

 

Recently, Forecast 3D, one of the oldest and largest privately-owned service bureaus in the U.S., became the first to offer full-scale 3D manufacturing with the installation of 12 HP 3D printing units.

 

In honor of tomorrow’s Manufacturing Day 2017, Forecast 3D Co-Founder Corey Weber discusses how that capability has transformed his business, and how it foretells a far greater disruption of the global manufacturing industry ahead.

 

 

What does Forecast 3D do?

 

IMG_0899.jpgMy brother Donovan and I started Forecast 3D back in 1994 as a rapid prototyping service bureau. Rapid prototyping is the original term for 3D printing, which back then was just becoming a viable way to quickly make revisions to prototypes of various things. HP’s Multi Jet Fusion has allowed us to use our prototyping prowess to expand into full-scale, end-to-end 3D production, but more on that later.

 

We started the company in a 500 square-foot space down by the beach here in Carlsbad, California with a $5,000 loan from our grandfather. Modest beginnings for sure. But we quickly became known for the high quality of our products and services and grew very fast. Today we have 49,000 square feet of 3D printing goodness using the latest manufacturing technologies to best fit our customers’ needs, including Multi Jet Fusion.

 

How have you seen the 3D printing industry evolve since you began?

It has majorly evolved since I began my career in 1990. I remember working with some of the early technologies and thinking this is junk! But so many of those technologies have since made tremendous advancements that have allowed the industry to grow at an amazing rate, and new technologies like Multi Jet Fusion have taken things to a whole new level with full 3D production. It used to be easy to keep track of everything that was going on, now there’s so much happening that just keeping up can be a full-time job.

 

Why did you decide to make such a big investment in Multi Jet Fusion with the installation of 12 HP 3D printing units?

When you’ve been in this industry as long as I have, you get to know a lot about both the pros and cons of 3D printing. The upsides are potentially limitless, but the main downside, the Achilles Heel that has kept 3D printing from becoming mainstream, has always been slow speed and high costs. HP has removed those shackles with Multi Jet Fusion and made 3D printing faster and more cost-effective than ever before, which opens up a whole new world of opportunities for us. When we first tested HP’s 3D printers a year ago we immediately saw how much they could achieve, and how far they could push the industry forward, so the only thing to do was go big.

 

 

What benefits do you see Multi Jet Fusion having over other types of manufacturing technology?

The speed alone is a tremendous benefit. To go from iterating multiple design cycles with prototypes to final production in one week is unprecedented. Being able to shorten the time-to-market can make a dramatic difference in the success of a product. And even if a product falls flat, the startup capital risk is so low that you can take your learnings and iterate a new, better product for little additional investment, especially important for smaller startups. 

 

The degree of manufacturing flexibility is one of the biggest benefits over conventional manufacturing technology, I strongly believe that once designers start to adopt the out-of-the-box thinking and boundless creativity that Multi Jet Fusion allows, we’ll see some amazing advancements in product design, innovation and performance. The companies that embrace this new mindset early will see a huge competitive advantage.

 

 

MJF_FORECAST3D_12_Printers_Pressv2.jpg 

How does being the first service bureau with the capacity for full-run 3D production with Multi Jet Fusion change your business now, and your outlook for the future?

Being the first to have this capacity has changed the way we think about 3D printing entirely. We’ve done small production jobs before, but the time and cost required by existing technologies made it impractical for anything beyond a few hundred parts. But with the installation of 12 Multi Jet Fusion units at our new facility, we now have the capacity to produce 600,000 parts in a single week. That’s the most significant leap that I’ve ever seen in 3D printing: going from prototyping and small batch production to full-run, large-scale 3D manufacturing. It’s drastically expanded the type and range of opportunities we can pursue, and it’s a microcosm for the way 3D printing is going to transform the entire global manufacturing industry.

 

Where do you see the 3D printing industry 5 years from now?

For decades, 3D printing has only been viewed as a viable manufacturing option by a small number of forward-thinking companies. But Multi Jet Fusion has turned that promise into a reality and opened the doors for the industry to grow at mass scale. I predict that in 5 years, 3D printing will already be a primary manufacturing process for at least 25% of companies in the world. Considering the size of the manufacturing industry, that is a mind-boggling amount of growth that will only continue to gain speed.

 

Ultimately, how do you think 3D printing’s transformation of the manufacturing industry will change the global business landscape, and change people’s lives on a personal level.

I think one of the greatest transformations that 3D printing will have on global business will be a push towards local manufacturing. Companies will be able to bring much of their manufacturing home, which will be positive in so many ways, especially in terms of the natural resources it requires to transport mass volumes of products overseas.

 

On a more personal level, kids these days are growing up with 3D printing as a household word, and getting introduced to the concept of computer-aided design at an early age. I think this will start a generational shift where today’s tech-savvy kids will be more inclined to make things rather than simply buy them.  Right now, consumer technology often means just going online to buy stuff. But in the future, I think people will have a less passive relationship with technology and will use it to make more things for themselves, customized to their own personal tastes.

 

I’ve custom-designed and printed many things for myself because they didn’t exist in the form that I needed them, from a cup holder for my ’68 Charger to a tool that cleans the leaves off my tile roof. Multi Jet Fusion gives you the power to create things quickly, at low cost, to the specifications of individual people, from my cup holder to a future with custom-printed shoes, cars, medical devices, household goods, and beyond. The possibilities are truly staggering.

 

Published: August 28, 2017

Dion Weisler, CEO, HP, Inc., and  Punit Renjen, CEO, Deloitte GlobalDion Weisler, CEO, HP, Inc., and Punit Renjen, CEO, Deloitte Global

Steam. Electricity. Automation. Each fueled an industrial revolution that changed how humans live and work. The Fourth Industrial Revolution will surpass all previous ones in size, shape, scope, and more importantly, complexity. Now, HP and Deloitte will accelerate this revolution through an unprecedented partnership.

Last week, HP and Deloitte hosted an event at HP’s Palo Alto headquarters to announce a major strategic alliance to digitally transform the $12 trillion global manufacturing industry. The partnership will bring together HP’s groundbreaking Multi Jet Fusion 3D printing solutions and unique partner ecosystem, with Deloitte’s global client reach, deep manufacturing relationships, and expertise in supply chain transformation.  

“Nothing’s really changed much in terms of manufacturing in almost 100 years. And it’s time, because there is a better mousetrap. There is a meaningful way to make a very broad impact on the way companies all around the world design, procure, manufacture, and deliver their products to customers,” said HP CEO Dion Weisler.

This digital industrial revolution will fundamentally change how the world designs, produces, distributes, and experiences everything. And the implications are astonishing: the World Economic Forum has estimated the benefit of this digital transformation the benefit of this digital transformation across the world’s largest industries—automotive, aerospace, medical technology, electronics, consumer goods, engineering, heavy industry—to business and society at $100 trillion over the next 10 years alone.

Weisler joined Deloitte Global Chief Executive Officer Punit Renjen to describe how a new wave of disruptive technologies—from artificial intelligence to robotics to big data to the Internet of Things—are driving unprecedented change in the world. Yet much of the world’s manufacturing systems have remained stuck in the analog era, tied to outdated thinking, tools, and processes that have become resource-intensive and economically inefficient.
Gil Perez, SVP, IoT and Distributed Manufacturing, SAP; Bob Jones, EVP , Global Sales and Services, Siemens ; Joe Sendra, VP Manufacturing/Technology, Johnson & Johnson; Doug Gish, Manufacturing Strategy Leader, Deloitte; Michelle Bockman (moderator), Global Head of 3D Printing Commercial Expansion & Development, HP Inc.Gil Perez, SVP, IoT and Distributed Manufacturing, SAP; Bob Jones, EVP , Global Sales and Services, Siemens ; Joe Sendra, VP Manufacturing/Technology, Johnson & Johnson; Doug Gish, Manufacturing Strategy Leader, Deloitte; Michelle Bockman (moderator), Global Head of 3D Printing Commercial Expansion & Development, HP Inc.This is the massive opportunity for 3D printing: to unleash entirely new ways of making things to befit our all-digital future, making life better for everyone, everywhere. This new manufacturing model will unlock unmatched economic potential, enabling capital to be redeployed to new areas, shortening supply chains, reducing carbon emissions, and eliminating production waste and inventory.

A highlight of the event was a panel, led by Michelle Bockman, HP’s new Global Head of 3D Printing Commercial Expansion & Development, and featuring manufacturing leaders from SAP, Siemens, Johnson & Johnson, and Deloitte. A technology showcase displayed innovative new parts produced by HP’s 3D printing solutions.

 

Watch the announcement.

Watch the panel discussion.

Learn more about HP 3D printing and printing solutions.

Published: August 25, 2017

Bob Jones, Executive VP of global sales, marketing and services, Siemens PLM SoftwareBob Jones, Executive VP of global sales, marketing and services, Siemens PLM Software

Bob Jones, Executive VP of global sales, marketing and services for Siemens PLM Software, was among the leaders who participated in an industry panel during yesterday’s announcement of HP’s new strategic alliance with Deloitte, the worldwide leader in professional services and digital supply chain transformations, aimed at accelerating the digital transformation of the $12 trillion global manufacturing industry with HP’s groundbreaking 3D printing solutions.

We caught up with Bob to learn how Siemens is transforming the global manufacturing industry with digitalization and additive manufacturing.

 

Q. What is Siemens’ perspective on the analog-to-digital transformation that is upon us?

A. It’s important to understand the distinction between “digitization” and “digitalization.” It’s the difference between taking an analog process and using digital technologies to mimic it for efficiency gains – and leveraging digital data to fundamentally transform processes, leading to more opportunities for disruptive innovation and new business models.

Digitalization is changing our daily lives, transforming entire industries and revolutionizing the global economy. The products we use every day, how they are produced and the enterprises that produce them will be dramatically changed by digitalization.

Today's market-leading companies are already seizing opportunities created by digitalization to accelerate innovation, employ new business models, and respond to dynamic customer and market demands with greater speed, agility, quality and at less cost.

 

Q. What does this transformation mean for companies that design and create?

A. Every company is on its own unique digital journey and is looking to digitalization to create differentiating value for its customers. Companies of all sizes are transforming into digital enterprises that produce smart, individualized products augmented by a digital communication language enabling innovative data-driven services and support.

Digital enterprises are thriving by digitally linking their product development and production operations to customers and global supply chain networks, which is changing the way ideas come to life and the way products and factories are utilized. 

Firewire Surfboards, a small-sized surfboard manufacturer in Carlsbad, Calif., is a customer that we've helped to innovate the next generation of surfboards. Firewire is using the power of digitalization to revolutionize the surfing experience by constructing performance-engineered and eco-friendly surfboards individually tuned to each customer’s surfing style and needs.

Newport News Shipbuilding is another example of how our customers are undergoing a digital transformation. Newport News is leveraging 3D model data as the foundation for a “drawingless ship” that can be built and maintained through electronic work instructions on tablets.

 

Q. What role does additive manufacturing play in Siemens’ vision for the future? 

A. Additive manufacturing is a disruptive force that is reshaping the way digital enterprises conceive, design, produce, distribute and service products. With additive manufacturing, companies are reimagining products that perform better, have more strength, less weight and are individualized to a customer’s personal needs – and are realizing these products on-demand and without the need for long lead-time and expensive tooling.

Siemens uses additive manufacturing for industrial production and we provide market-leading software and production automation solutions for our customers. Siemens manufacturing divisions are already making breakthroughs in the areas of designing components with performance-enhancing complex internal geometry that can only be 3D printed, dramatically reducing lead-time (for example, Siemens gas turbine burner), 3D printing spare parts on-demand, and the streamlining of supply chains.

However, while additive manufacturing is proving to create business value, gaps in the value chain must be closed in order to scale-up its use for mass industrial production. Costly data conversions between software applications, uncontrolled data and process steps, scarce expertise, and 3D printers stranded on islands are just some of the gaps that must be addressed in order to advance additive manufacturing into mainstream product development, production and business operations. 

Our vision at Siemens is to industrialize additive manufacturing by enabling control of the complete process via a connected and continuous digital thread from concept to finished 3D printed part and extending into field use. We’re delivering on our vision by offering integrated additive manufacturing software solutions for all primary design, engineering, manufacturing planning and production functions – an end-to-end product development system underpinned by digital twins, production automation hardware, expertise, and a vibrant ecosystem of partners and customers.

 

Q. How does the collaboration between Siemens and HP play a role in Siemens’ vision for additive manufacturing?

A. We recognize that Siemens cannot industrialize additive manufacturing and transform the global manufacturing industry alone. Siemens and HP have a long-standing relationship and we share a vision for helping our customers compete by taking a comprehensive and integrated end-to-end approach to industrialize additive manufacturing - and to transform products and how they are made.

We believe HP 3D printing technology with Multi Jet Fusion and voxel-level control need modern digital design and production automation tools to unlock the full power of the technology – and scale-up additive manufacturing for the industrial mass production – and we look forward to continuing to work with HP to realize our shared vision.

 

About Bob Jones

Robert Jones is executive vice president of global sales, marketing and services for Siemens PLM Software, a business unit of the Siemens Digital Factory Division. He and his team are responsible for the company’s sales, marketing and service delivery on a global basis. He works in partnership with Siemens PLM Software’s zone sales leaders to aggressively target geographic, industry and strategic corporate opportunities. Prior to his current position Jones was senior vice president and managing director of the Americas with responsibility for sales, sales support and services delivery in North and South America.

Before assuming his Americas role, Jones led sales, sales support and services delivery for Siemens PLM Software’s U.S. organization and prior to that, was responsible for the company’s global General Motors account. Throughout his career with Siemens, Jones has held a number of leadership roles in both sales and marketing. His responsibilities have included direct and indirect sales and marketing strategies for the PLM portfolio to the automotive OEM and supplier industry.

Before joining Siemens PLM Software as an account executive, Robert began his career in product development at Johnson Controls, Automotive Systems Group (JCI/ASG). During his tenure at JCI/ASG, he was a chief engineer responsible for mechanism programs to OEMs in America, Asia and Europe.

Jones has a master's degree in Mechanical Engineering from Virginia Polytechnic University and a bachelor's degree in Mechanical Engineering from Western Michigan University.

Robert and his wife, Holly, reside in Northville, Michigan, with their four sons.

Published: August 14, 2017

Tatooine web size.jpg

 

Until the rise of the First Industrial Revolution, products were generally handcrafted and made-to-order as needed. Few things were made in advance to warehouse for later sale, supply chains (or what passed for them) were scrappy at best, and production speeds were painfully slow.

Because products were generally produced reactively and crafted individually by an artisan, the roles of designer and manufacturer were pretty much indistinguishable. To the blacksmith who is not only custom-crafting shoes for a horse, but custom-tailoring one unique shoe for each hoof, the distinction between design and production was moot.

That all changed with the rise of the machine in the late 18th century, when steam power mechanized and standardized the manufacturing process, but also greatly limited the potential for variation and customization to consumers. And Henry Ford’s Model T took manufacturing to new levels of speed, efficiency, and standardization at the start of the 20th century with the introduction of mass production and factories. 

Products are made much differently now, of course, with technological advances continuing to increase the speed, volume, and consistency of manufacturing worldwide. But despite all of this, the basic design and manufacturing process hasn’t fundamentally evolved over the last century to meet the changing needs of customers, pushing production further and further from the consumer and constraining design flexibility, customization and innovation.

 

Digitial transformation with 3D printing

We are now at the dawn of a Fourth Industrial Revolution, where disruptive 3D printing technology is driving the complete digital transformation of the $12 trillion global manufacturing industry. And while it marks a quantum technological leap into our all-digital future, the coming revolution will also reclaim the power of custom-crafting from the pre-industrial age. Together, these forces will create a new era of mass-customization where design—and designers—have never been more important.

3D printing is completely reinventing the way things are conceived, designed, produced and distributed. It’s many advantages over traditional manufacturing include faster production speeds, lower costs, simplified logistics and lower carbon footprint. But among the most important advantages is increased flexibility: the ability to accommodate changes or modifications within the manufacturing process.

 

3D printing vs. injection molding

Heavy upfront investments are needed in traditional processes like injection molding, where physical molds, as well as a complex array of machine tools and equipment, must be custom created in advance. If product specs or design tweaks are later needed, those things need to be remanufactured at great expense to accommodate the changes.

Because of these associated costs, products are only created if there’s sufficient demand, so only the center of the bell curve is ever designed for. For users or markets perceived as too big or too small, the last industrial revolution just left you behind.

3D printing has changed this prohibitive system by democratizing the process—replacing the costly, limiting physical molding process with inexpensive, easily-adjustable digital files that lower startup costs and reduce barriers for entry. And as manufacturing systems become more flexible through 3D printing, the designer’s role will become more and more important because they’re now able to design for any user, at any scale.

As the process from design to prototype to production becomes smoother and more efficient, the designer’s ability to employ “enhanced learnings,” or a continuous cycle of learning and improvement from each build step to address form, fit and function will become paramount to ensure that every user is designed for, and that the product solutions can fit their individual needs. It’s only through living, breathing designers that 3D printing will continue to reduce the distance between idea and physical reality.

 

Designers are key

As a sign of designers’ increasingly crucial role, MIT recently held its first professional course in design for additive manufacturing, drawing leading research scientists, engineers, developers, designers and project managers from industries using 3D printing from aerospace to automotive to biotech to robotics and beyond.

The age of mass-production and standardization has ignored users who are perceived as too big or too small, moving the manufacturing process further and further from them and their unique needs. This blanket approach to design has become so ubiquitous that we’ve come to assume, and even accept, that some products just aren’t for us.

3D printing changes all this by elevating the designer to define the user and design specifically for them, no matter how many or how few, and make the “one size fits all” approach to mass-production a thing of the past.

The true potential of 3D printing will be realized when we can develop products that cannot be manufactured today, in ways that were previously impossible, helping to make life better for everyone, everywhere. That future is very much within our grasp, and unleashing the power of designers is the key.

 

Published: August 07, 2017

As HP continues its journey to reinvent the global manufacturing industry, it is critical to have visionary and experienced leaders charting the way. Michelle Bockman, former executive vice president at GE Digital, recently joined HP to lead its 3D printing market expansion efforts.

At GE, Bockman most recently led the company’s ambitious strategy to build a software-driven digital future for large industrial customers. With more than 20 years of experience in a wide range of functions and industries, she’s led global operations, managed engineering, driven sales and marketing, built new digital businesses – even ran an industrial manufacturing plant.

Michelle BockmanMichelle BockmanBockman’s diverse experience gives her a fresh perspective on unlocking new value for customers who are reinventing their operations. We caught up with her to learn more about keys to driving the digital industrial transformation of production.

 

Q. Why did you choose this time to join HP?

A. We’re on the cusp of a new industrial revolution that could be greater than anything we’ve ever seen – ubiquitous connectivity, AI, robotics, the internet of things, 3D printing and more are all converging to drive unprecedented social and economic change. HP plays a central role in this revolution and is really leading the way with innovations in 3D printing, blended reality and other technologies businesses are embracing in their digital reinventions. Put this all together and we are poised to transform some of the largest industries on the face of the earth.

This is the place to be if you want to profoundly change the way people live, work and interact with one another. HP is one of the founders of Silicon Valley and has a strong heritage of reinvention which, quite frankly, also appealed to my entrepreneurial spirit. I can’t tell you how excited I am about this adventure in innovation. 

 

Q. Tell us about your new role leading the expansion of 3D Printing for HP. Where will you be focused?

A. To grossly oversimplify, I have a broad responsibility to expand the overall 3D printing market for HP in partnership with our foundational customers, strategic partners, and materials ecosystem, and drive the development of new digital services for the 3D printing business. What this really means is focusing on customer outcomes by working deeply with market leaders such as BMW, Jabil, Johnson & Johnson, and Nike as they embrace 3D printing to transform their businesses, and applying these lessons learned to the entirety of our product portfolio, so we can really accelerate development of new applications and services. 

It also means leading our global strategic alliances with SIs and software partners, and to drive our open materials strategy with the largest chemical companies on earth, as we’ll need to leverage the world to transform a $12 trillion industry. Finally, no digital industrial transformation is complete without developing the next generation of connected, digital services that unlock unique insights and value for our customers and partners.  

Q. As a longtime industry veteran, where do you see the greatest opportunities for change?

A. 3D printing technology has been around awhile, but it’s poised for a real breakout. The combination of new technology such as HP’s Multi Jet Fusion, which is up to 10 times faster and half the cost of other systems, plus the radical expansion of new materials with a simultaneous plummet in cost due to our open materials platform, means the economic promise of 3D printing is finally ready to deliver. This is no longer technology just for prototyping or the R&D team. This is a platform for large-scale industrial production. 
Couple the continued march of those innovations with the larger digital transformation unfolding across the entire design, production, and distribution workflow, and you have a massive opportunity to help companies innovate faster, be more agile in their manufacturing, and implement more flexible supply chains. This unlocks huge economic opportunity, new business models, and competitive advantage. I believe that those who invest in digital transformation will reap the rewards, and we are just scratching the surface of what this reinvention means for some of the largest companies and industries in the world.

Q. You’ve led a diverse range of functions over your career.  What else can you share with us from your journey?

A. I like to solve really hard problems with smart, curious and passionate people in industries that are changing the world. That’s what drew me to mechanical engineering in college and continues to drive me today. Over the course of my career, I’ve been lucky enough to experience many facets of businesses – from leading large organizations through change to developing new products and services to direct and daily interaction with the customer. At the end of the day what we do really matters if it delivers value to our customers and, in my mind, also delivers value to the world at large. I couldn’t be more thrilled to be part of the HP 3D printing team, which is striving to achieve exactly those goals.