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Published: April 26, 2017

 

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At HP, we believe in the power and promise of committing to a more diverse and inclusive workplace. And we’re proud of the progress we’ve made, with the most diverse board of directors of any technology company, among other things, and the awards and recognition we’ve won because of it.

But we are far from satisfied.

That’s why we’re continuing our efforts and literally reinventing the standard for diversity and inclusion at HP. We are not merely correcting the underrepresentation of women, people of color and other minorities in our workforce and among our partners and suppliers, we are creating models of behavior – and role models.

We call this new journey "Reinvent Mindsets" because we want to make it clear that just as our business reinvents how our customers live, work and play; we are also reinventing how we think about diversity and inclusion. Reinvent Mindsets comprises ongoing internal training, new measurement tools and other efforts, but focuses on two areas we think haven’t gotten the attention they deserve.

 

Tackling unconscious bias

First, we’ve come to see that a major barrier to attracting and retaining a diverse team is what’s called unconscious bias – those split-second impressions made by our brains about race, gender, sexual orientation, religion, nationality and many other characteristics, that impact how we view and respond to people. We’re usually not even aware we’ve made an assumption about a person, let alone how these perceptions drive our behavior and decisions. But we all do it. The good news is, that once we’re made aware of these biases, we can take concrete steps to reverse them.

We want to bring attention to unconscious bias at HP, especially among our leaders, hiring managers and talent acquisition team. It’s one of the reasons why the Reinvent Mindsets campaign includes a provocative video series that shines a light on how minorities and others can become casualties of unconscious bias. The first is here. We hope you’ll share it far and wide to advance the conversation about these human biases and their toll.

 Second, to make sure that as we contemplate our next generation of talent that we are reaching new places to find them.  It’s why we’re partnering with historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) in a unique business school competition to provide promising students hands-on experience with us. We are excited about investing in the future.

 

Embedding Reinvent Mindsets into our DNA

Here’s what Reinvent Mindsets is not: an initiative that’s here today, gone tomorrow. Instead, it is an idea and endeavor that will be embedded throughout HP, woven into the very fabric of who we are, into our DNA. 

"Reinvent Mindsets" – as well as HP’s reinvented mindset – is our future.

It is what will allow our team members to be their authentic selves. And, crucially, it is what will allow HP to become an authentically global, authentically fair, open-minded and welcoming place that not only embraces divergent opinions and ways of doing things, but eagerly seeks them out. Only then – by ensuring a diverse workforce whose members feel they belong, that they are an equal part of something big and are integral to our success – will we be able to remain an industry leader in technology. The results of this kind of thinking will be more creativity, more ingenuity, more curiosity, more inventiveness, more authenticity, more ideas, more learning, more sharing, more fun and more innovation.

At HP, we are working toward a day when the most important numbers are not about headcount, but, by Reinvent Mindsets, about how many innovations we’ve introduced, how many have been embraced by the public and how many are driving positive change throughout the world. 

    Leadership
Published: August 07, 2017

As HP continues its journey to reinvent the global manufacturing industry, it is critical to have visionary and experienced leaders charting the way. Michelle Bockman, former executive vice president at GE Digital, recently joined HP to lead its 3D printing market expansion efforts.

At GE, Bockman most recently led the company’s ambitious strategy to build a software-driven digital future for large industrial customers. With more than 20 years of experience in a wide range of functions and industries, she’s led global operations, managed engineering, driven sales and marketing, built new digital businesses – even ran an industrial manufacturing plant.

Michelle BockmanMichelle BockmanBockman’s diverse experience gives her a fresh perspective on unlocking new value for customers who are reinventing their operations. We caught up with her to learn more about keys to driving the digital industrial transformation of production.

 

Q. Why did you choose this time to join HP?

A. We’re on the cusp of a new industrial revolution that could be greater than anything we’ve ever seen – ubiquitous connectivity, AI, robotics, the internet of things, 3D printing and more are all converging to drive unprecedented social and economic change. HP plays a central role in this revolution and is really leading the way with innovations in 3D printing, blended reality and other technologies businesses are embracing in their digital reinventions. Put this all together and we are poised to transform some of the largest industries on the face of the earth.

This is the place to be if you want to profoundly change the way people live, work and interact with one another. HP is one of the founders of Silicon Valley and has a strong heritage of reinvention which, quite frankly, also appealed to my entrepreneurial spirit. I can’t tell you how excited I am about this adventure in innovation. 

 

Q. Tell us about your new role leading the expansion of 3D Printing for HP. Where will you be focused?

A. To grossly oversimplify, I have a broad responsibility to expand the overall 3D printing market for HP in partnership with our foundational customers, strategic partners, and materials ecosystem, and drive the development of new digital services for the 3D printing business. What this really means is focusing on customer outcomes by working deeply with market leaders such as BMW, Jabil, Johnson & Johnson, and Nike as they embrace 3D printing to transform their businesses, and applying these lessons learned to the entirety of our product portfolio, so we can really accelerate development of new applications and services. 

It also means leading our global strategic alliances with SIs and software partners, and to drive our open materials strategy with the largest chemical companies on earth, as we’ll need to leverage the world to transform a $12 trillion industry. Finally, no digital industrial transformation is complete without developing the next generation of connected, digital services that unlock unique insights and value for our customers and partners.  

Q. As a longtime industry veteran, where do you see the greatest opportunities for change?

A. 3D printing technology has been around awhile, but it’s poised for a real breakout. The combination of new technology such as HP’s Multi Jet Fusion, which is up to 10 times faster and half the cost of other systems, plus the radical expansion of new materials with a simultaneous plummet in cost due to our open materials platform, means the economic promise of 3D printing is finally ready to deliver. This is no longer technology just for prototyping or the R&D team. This is a platform for large-scale industrial production. 
Couple the continued march of those innovations with the larger digital transformation unfolding across the entire design, production, and distribution workflow, and you have a massive opportunity to help companies innovate faster, be more agile in their manufacturing, and implement more flexible supply chains. This unlocks huge economic opportunity, new business models, and competitive advantage. I believe that those who invest in digital transformation will reap the rewards, and we are just scratching the surface of what this reinvention means for some of the largest companies and industries in the world.

Q. You’ve led a diverse range of functions over your career.  What else can you share with us from your journey?

A. I like to solve really hard problems with smart, curious and passionate people in industries that are changing the world. That’s what drew me to mechanical engineering in college and continues to drive me today. Over the course of my career, I’ve been lucky enough to experience many facets of businesses – from leading large organizations through change to developing new products and services to direct and daily interaction with the customer. At the end of the day what we do really matters if it delivers value to our customers and, in my mind, also delivers value to the world at large. I couldn’t be more thrilled to be part of the HP 3D printing team, which is striving to achieve exactly those goals.

Published: June 12, 2017

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A good role model is hard to find – and that’s especially true if you’re a woman in the technology industry.

Role modeling, along with tackling unconscious bias in hiring and investing in programs to widen the pipeline of women in technical positions, is of course part of a well-rounded strategy for leveling the playing field.

Of those strategies, role modeling is probably the trickiest to execute well. But as we’re learning at HP, where I’m head of diversity and inclusion, it doesn’t have to be that way. 

Forbes logo.jpgThis week I’ll take the stage at the Forbes Women’s Summit in New York, where, on a panel with my colleague Stephanie Dismore, we'll aim to break down some of the misconceptions about role modeling and share what is working at HP.

At its core, good role modeling revolves around trust. Not only does it require trust between individuals, it also requires an organization that fosters frank conversations, openness and the ability to meet people where they are.

That’s evident when your company actively seeks out ways to become a “speak up” culture, as we are working to do at HP. It’s enabling women to have courageous conversations – especially about the unique challenges they face in the tech workforce – and talk about barriers to their success.

Among those barriers: Outdated advice that recruiters and hiring experts might bring to the table when considering female candidates. These damaging stereotypes are among the raw, emotional sticking points in the video below, unveiled today as part of HP’s ongoing “Reinvent Mindsets” campaign. It features heartfelt conversations between fathers and their young adult daughters, who together confront some of the blatantly sexist hiring practices that still threaten to hold women back.

There are other sociological barriers, especially in the often insular bubble of Silicon Valley.

People tend to hire what feels familiar – a bias that gives preference (whether overt or unconsciously) to people who look, speak and think like them. What we have been pushing for at HP is learning to recognize and remove this type of affinity bias to help diversify our ranks.

Another win for tackling affinity bias: Removing it helps give women of color, especially black women in technology, an entry point that that they have often been denied. The same goes for women who hail from cultural, social and religious backgrounds that have been “othered” in tech.

Still more barriers arise years before women are thinking about entering in the workforce, as young students entering higher education flee the hard sciences. The recent groundswell of interest in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) learning, as well as tech-ed focused organizations and nonprofits, shows that there’s still a critical need to build the pipeline of girls and women with technical talent.

One of the things we’re very passionate about as a company is to be able to partner with STEM and educational programs, such as Black Girls Code, that are impacting the lives of underrepresented youth.

It’s one of the reasons HP awarded Chief Executive Officer and Founder of Black Girls Code Kimberly Bryant, our inaugural Diversity Champion Award at the Forbes Women’s Summit this week.CEO and Founder of Black Girls Code, Kimberly Bryant.CEO and Founder of Black Girls Code, Kimberly Bryant.

Her organization, which has scaled up from the Bay Area to have satellites all over the country, aims to provide African-American youth with the skills to occupy some of the 1.4 million computing job openings expected to be available in the U.S. by 2020.

More black women in technical positions holds space for girls looking to succeed in the industry, just by making sure that there are people who look like them to emulate. Bryant’s done a phenomenal job of inspiring and engaging girls to learn computer programming skills and as she puts it, “become builders of their own futures.” There’s something incredibly powerful about internalizing the message: “She looks like me, and she’s succeeding.”

 While HP and others in the tech industry are actively working to knock down some of these barriers to inclusion and diversity, there is a lot more work that needs to be done to cultivate role models for women at their respective companies.

When I think of successful role modeling, I think of the “growth mindset” that HP is adopting as it builds its corporate culture. This mindset is critical to the success of creating a place where women can bring all of who they are to work. Without it, we lose out on greater opportunities to innovate, to develop leaders and yes – to grow our bottom line.

Here’s a rundown of some of our best practices:

1) Build networks of trust where women can get to know each other. Networks of trust enable role models to share and be open. Building out women’s power circles and affinity groups enables real sharing of their hopes, their dreams about the future and their passions. It helps role models become authentic cheerleaders by enabling them to sponsor, mentor and coach others.

2) It is not only a woman's responsibility to be a role models. If every employee brought someone else in who is from an underrepresented group, we would speed up the trajectory of change. The model we have at HP is an “everybody in” culture – it is everyone’s responsibility to coach, to mentor and to lead.  We celebrate leaders at all levels. That’s especially important for our male allies to understand.

3) Company leadership must walk the walk. None of these efforts matter unless there is demand for change at the top. Our diversity and inclusion efforts at HP are backed up and amplified by leaders such as Chief Legal Officer Kim Rivera and Chief Marketing Officer Antonio Lucio, who are using their voices and influence to make change in their industries by demanding that outside vendors, partners and agencies working with HP meet certain standards for diversity.

To learn more about HP’s Global Diversity and Inclusion efforts, visit the company’s website and follow me on Twitter. Follow along with the Forbes Women’s Summit, which continues through June 13, with the hashtag #redefinepower.

Published: March 08, 2017

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When technology companies use the word “disruption,” they often apply big-idea hype to a new product or service promising to shake up the status quo.

Rarely does the industry turn the notion of disruption inward and apply it to its own biases and operating systems, especially when it comes to gender parity in technology.

At HP Inc., where I serve as Chief Diversity Officer, we’re doing it every day. Our goal is to reinvent the standard for diversity and inclusion by embedding it into everything we do and today is no different as we celebrate International Women’s Week. Diversity and inclusion are important every week of the year, and this week reminds us to celebrate

the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women.InternationalWomensDay-web.jpg

At HP, we have a legacy of diversity and inclusion to maintain and grow. I’ll take a second to share some of what we’ve accomplished so far as a young company, since they differentiate us in an industry with a workforce that’s predominantly white and male.

HP is counted among the top tech companies with women and underrepresented minorities in executive positions, where 27 percent of HP executives, director and above are women. After the company separated in late 2015, HP increased its women executive ranks by 4 percent. And our executive leadership team is today comprised of 21 percent underrepresented minorities, with executives representing seven different countries of origin.

Women make up more than 55 percent of broader employee functions, including Legal, Finance, HR and Marketing. That’s compared to industry averages that top out at around 30 percent, according to a recent CNET report. At HP, women represent approximately 20 percent of general and software engineering positions. The tech industry average, CNET reports, hovers at around 16 percent for all women in technical roles.

I don’t trot out these statistics so that HP can rest on its laurels, but rather to show how much work there is to do. HP’s culture and our values dictate that we must demonstrate the change we want to see in industry and beyond.

These changes start with recruiting outreach and hiring efforts. We’re casting a wider net in our search while continuing to educate our talent acquisition teams about unconscious bias and cultural competence. We’re implementing aggressive strategies that ensure we have more diverse talent pools to choose from when hiring at the executive leadership level and in succession planning. 

 

To be clear, we’re not doing this as a “check the box” exercise. We really are hiring, and talent is our only criteria.

 Chief Diversity Officer Lesley Slaton BrownChief Diversity Officer Lesley Slaton BrownIt doesn’t end there. Once hired, we want to send a strong message to everyone who works for HP around the globe: You belong here.

By nurturing inclusion and mutual respect, we all can win at our jobs, and in the marketplace. HP’s unique culture not only drives innovation in our businesses, but it also shapes how employees feel about the work that they do each day. It affects their level of commitment to HP’s mission and how empowered they are to innovate and take risks.

The HP Way – our shorthand for the cultural touchstones that guide the company—is a recipe for developing well-rounded employees who aren’t just employees. We want our people to come to work and fully be who they are and bring their unique perspective to the conversation.

These efforts, of course, are part of HP’s reinvention story. But they are also part of my own journey. I’ve had remarkable opportunities to grow my skills and my career, starting at Boise State University, where I was an NCAA Scholarship recipient and lettered in women’s basketball.

I believe that my subsequent 20-year career in global marketing, branding and communications goes hand in hand with championing diversity and inclusion at every level of an organization. Nowhere is this more imperative than in tech, an industry that lives and dies on innovation.

At HP, we know that diversity drives innovation, because better ideas come about through give-and-take between diverse stakeholders and constituencies. It drives performance, too. A McKinsey report on diversity highlighted that companies in the top quartile in terms of ethnic and racial diversity are 35 percent more likely to outperform those who do not.

The fostering of openness, courageous conversation and trust helps level the playing field so we can get down to business and drive results.

As one of Silicon Valley’s storied founding companies, HP is well qualified to lead the way toward reinventing mindsets. We have the most diverse board of directors of any tech company in the country. And our leadership—from Chief Marketing Officer Antonio Lucio’s challenge to agency partners to Head of Global Legal Affairs Kim Rivera’s initiative with our legal partners—have demonstrated the depth of our commitment to affect change.  

A great way to dive deeper is by exploring our updated Diversity and Inclusion website. It includes a personal message, where I talk about our efforts and the opportunities for growth at the company for current and potential HP employees.

We are proud of the impact we have been able to have so far, and now is the time for us to continue to make HP a place where women and underrepresented groups can fully be themselves and do their best work. We hope HP can become a beacon for change as we aim to foster inclusion, compassion and understanding around the world.

Let’s get started.

Published: January 17, 2017

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The first Gen Z-ers will earn their undergraduate degrees this spring.

Nothing like the revelation that someone born in 1995 is legally buying alcohol AND entering the workforce to make you want to relive the glory days. In fact, by 2020, this group will constitute 36 percent of the global workforce.

And 2017 brings other revelations. Every January, the World Economic Forum’s annual meet in Davos lets us ponder what is possible.

And as Gen Z comes of age, it’s incredible to imagine how their world will change. While mainstream culture still grapples with millennials, Gen Z will catalyze major societal shifts in the next 30 years; from food and healthcare, to Internet access and infrastructure.

Among the WEF’s strategic initiatives, two megatrends will particularly influence the world that a fifty-something Gen-Z-er lives in come 2050: rapid urbanization and hyper-connectivity. These two dynamics will create a barely-recognizable human experience by integrating our physical and digital experiences into one blended reality.

 

New urban environments for new expectations

The WEF’s Future of Urban Development and Services project has opened eyes to the challenges and opportunities of rapid urbanization.

By 2050, Gen Z will be fifty-plus, an age group that is the biggest demographic in the world. By that same point, the UN estimates they will be part of a global population of 9.6 billion, with two-thirds living in urban areas.

On average, they will spend three years in any one job and have a total of 17, and they will live in 15 different places. No wonder this group also tends to rent things more often than own them.

Even more vital is how these digital natives have grown up: With a mobile phone in their pocket, the internet at their fingertips every day, and five screens constantly available - smartphone, tablet, laptop, TV and desktop. And all of which increasingly have some form of artificial intelligence built in.

Cities can be reinvented for this new urban reality. Smart buildings, more immersive and ambient computing technologies, and connectivity built in to virtually everything.

But as this generation ages, they’ll tell you it’s sometimes hard to teach an old dog new tricks. Which is perhaps why the people who comprise this next generation may find themselves living in places like The Great City outside of Chengdu, China - a greenfield city built for just 80,000 people with no cars, 48 percent less energy and 58 percent less water use than traditional cities, and generating 89 percent less landfill waste and 60 percent less carbon dioxide.

 

Connecting everyone

Two-thirds of the world will live in urban areas by 2050, but 95 percent of them will be in what, today, we consider emerging markets.

 If we are to reinvent future cities, we must connect absolutely everything and everyone.

 Again, the WEF’s Hyperconnected World and Internet for All initiatives are appropriately focused. By 2020, there will be 50 billion networked devices, and by 2021 4G coverage will reach about 75 percent of the global population. The thirty years beyond that will see not only cars, thermostats and refrigerators connected to the Internet of Things, but an explosion in the Internet of ALL Things: connected sidewalks, furniture, and even disposable items like trash bags.

 Connecting humans themselves is the most exciting.

 By 2050, this on-demand generation will be part of an enormous fifty-plus age group that will need more access to high quality care. With things like hearing aids, pacemakers and wearables, humans are already somewhat ‘bionic.’ But by 2050, the warehouse worker that resembles Iron Man won’t be the stuff of comic books. And restoring a blind person’s vision will simply be science, not science fiction.

Perhaps the most impactful part of this hyper-connected future will be advances in remote care. A Gen-Z-er that takes a job with a biotech company this summer may outfit doctors with augmented reality glasses for hands free information; or create the AI-enhanced robot allowing a surgeon in New York to operate on a patient in Nigeria.

But creating all of these new experiences also requires a new way of designing and building the world around us. Current supply chains and economies aren’t equipped for this on-demand, sustainable future.

This week, our CEO is in Davos taking part on a panel that looks at the fourth industrial revolution, a massive societal shift that will transform how we create, deliver and consume things. In its wake, cities will change, demographics will be reinvented, and new experiences will take shape.

The common outcome in all these trends is our persistent trek toward blended reality: the intertwining of our digital and physical worlds; man and machine combined to make life better.

Gen Z’s future is looking bright.

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 The World Economic Forum annual meeting continues through January 20. Follow me and the HP Newsroom on Twitter for all the latest from HP at the event.