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Published: August 10, 2016

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Years ago, an announcement about a new line of personal computers would highlight the robust processing power, increased memory, greater storage space and many of the other upgrades that would inevitably lead to a hefty sticker price. Back then, a new PC needed more oomph, what with all of the individual specialty programs that users would install to perform basic tasks – and users paid for it.

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Today, the world of computing is different. Sure, some people still need that increased power – but a growing number of customers are relying mostly on cloud-based applications, such as social media sites, online storage and web-based programs. They store their photos on the web, not on their hard drives, and they’re more concerned about the strength of the web connection rather than the power of the processor.

Oh, and they’re not interested in breaking the bank for a new PC, either.

Understanding what’s important to this growing set of users, HP has revamped its line of Windows-based Stream PCs to provide more of what customers want – stronger Wi-Fi antenna technology to make sure connections have greater reach and fewer hiccups, a few extra hours of battery life, lighter weight and a thinner form factor. HP has even dropped the price of select models to make a Stream PC even more affordable. 

“We’ve enjoyed positive feedback about the HP Stream family, which for many consumers is exactly what they need to access content and services in the cloud from wherever they are,” said Kevin Frost, vice president and general manager, Consumer Personal Systems at HP. “We’ve continued to raise the bar on this popular cloud-based notebook to make it even more portable, more attractive and affordable for customers.”

The updated portfolio now includes an updated 11.6-inch diagonal and a new 14-inch diagonal Stream notebooks, as well as an 11.6-inch diagonal HP Stream x360, which flexes into four positions and can be used in laptop mode (for working), standing mode (for entertainment), tablet mode (for on-the-go) and tent mode (for sharing). Recognizing that customization is also important to many consumers who are enticed by the Stream’s specs and price tag, the new PCs now come in four new vibrant color options.

It’s no wonder that, earlier this year, CNET gave a nod to the Stream PC’s “divine design” and liked that it was affordable but full-featured enough for everyday tasks, making them “perfect for Facebooking, Netflixing and streaming audio … as well as full apps such as Photoshop and Microsoft Word, not their browser-based equivalents.”

Since the release of the first Stream PCs two years ago, HP engineers have been pushing the boundaries of what the HP Stream can do.

 

Newest specs

The notebooks feature dual-antenna 802.11 ac 2x2 Wi-Fi for improved wireless connectivity. An enhanced Wi-Fi experience means that users enjoy fast connection speeds, less video buffering, fewer dead zones and speedier downloads. For faster data transfers, the HP Stream includes USB 3.0 among its ports and connections.

The Stream notebooks have also been redesigned for users who want an affordable, thin, stylish and light portable computer that doesn’t skimp on features. In select regions, the notebooks are offered in an array of vibrant colors - including Aqua Blue, Violet Purple and Snow White for the Stream 11 and 14, and Jet Black as the fourth color option for the x360 – that allow users to highlight their personalities.

Likewise, some models also come with advanced displays – such as an HD touch-enabled display and HD WLED-backlit display with an antiglare screen – so that users can latest video technology, where available. The x360 also allows users to rotate their display a full 360 degrees to convert in to four different positions, which is great for collaboration, screen sharing and presentations.

More specs here.

 

#Workhappy with HP Stream

Select models of the new Stream notebooks also come with a one-year subscription of Office 365 Personal, which includes full versions of Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Outlook, and OneNote. In addition, users get 1TB of storage space on OneDrive for easy storing and content sharing and 60 Skype World minutes per month for staying connected to friends and family. All of this makes for a truly mobile computing experience — whether at work or play.

 

Classroom-ready HP Stream Pro

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The Stream notebooks have been so popular that the HP Stream 11 Pro, which is designed for education customers, will be available starting in late September in select countries. The Stream 11 Pro is offered in Jet Black and come equipped with 2x2 Wi-Fi to ensure excellent connectivity in busy classrooms, on college campuses or while on the road. The notebook will also come in an additional 4GB/64GB model offering faster boot-up speeds and additional storage for learning materials and classroom curricula.

For more information about the Stream notebooks, including pricing and availability, visit HP.com.

    Education Mobile Computing
Published: September 20, 2017

Refugees at the Dzaleka Refugee Camp using HP technology to immerse themselves in the AppFactory Program.Refugees at the Dzaleka Refugee Camp using HP technology to immerse themselves in the AppFactory Program.

 

By Nate Hurst, Chief Sustainability and Social Impact Officer of HP Inc. and Mary Snapp, Corporate Vice President of Microsoft Philanthropies.

 

 

Malawi, Africa is one of the most underserved nations in the world—over one half of Malawians live on just one dollar per day. Close to 40,000 people currently residing in Malawi are refugees, and 28,000 of them now call the Dzaleka Refugee Camp home after fleeing from genocide and political insecurities in their countries.

One way to empower refugees to break the cycle of poverty is by bridging the digital divide through education—and that’s where HP and Microsoft come in.

As part of the commitment for the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR) Connectivity for Refugees program, HP and Microsoft have launched AppFactory, a program to improve the state of software development and bring quality learning, IT skills development and entrepreneurship training to the people living in the Dzaleka. By equipping refugees with technological savvy, they will have the tools needed to succeed in today’s hyper-globalized digital economy beyond Malawi’s borders.

This is the first AppFactory implemented within a refugee community, aimed at building economic and learning opportunities for people in the camp. The program is part of the Microsoft 4Afrika Initiative, through which the company helps provide access to critical skill-building programs on the African continent. Also through 4Afrika, Microsoft is working to provide affordable access to technology, such as the “white spaces” Internet connectivity infrastructure they have built out in and around Dzaleka. HP is providing computing technology to ensure refugee youth living in the Malawi camp have the devices needed to participate in AppFactory.

In addition to providing tools and training, AppFactory includes an internship program to give talented and passionate refugees the chance to cultivate world-class software development skills. Through a hands-on approach, the students will work with real scenarios locally across the Refugee Ambassador community, and will be mentored by fully dedicated, experienced master software craftsmen from the industry. The in-demand IT skills and experience students gain from this program will enable them to pursue careers anywhere on the continent or around the world.

Affordable, accessible Internet is the first step in building a collaborative ecosystem to provide quality learning, health, safety and services to the people residing in Dzaleka. By giving refugees Internet access and the tools to harness the power of technology, they will have the chance to transcend borders and succeed in the global digital economy.

 

Published: June 26, 2017

Some of the 3D printed designs created by students of KiraKira3D's  curricula.Some of the 3D printed designs created by students of KiraKira3D's curricula.

 Anybody who’s encountered a middle- or high-schooler studying math or science has heard this frustrating complaint: “When am I going to use this in real life?” 

KiraKira3D Founder and CEO Suz SomersallKiraKira3D Founder and CEO Suz SomersallIt’s the very same question that Suz Somersall, CEO and Founder of KiraKira3D, had as an aspiring engineering student at Brown University, where she found the materials for learning mechanical engineering software utilitarian, lacking context and mostly geared toward men. She was turned off by lesson plans for creating hand tools, auto parts and gears, she said, objects that didn’t seem to further her ambitions to be an artist and designer.

“I wanted to study engineering, but the content offered in the intro classes wasn’t very compelling,” she said. “What I wanted was to be inspired to be creative.”

It’s one of the reasons Somersall started KiraKira Academy, which aims to close the gender gap in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) by teaching students the technical skills needed to create virtual and physical products using computer aided design (CAD) software.

KiraKira3D said this week it’s working with HP to produce a new series of approachable, video-based lessons to teach 3D design skills using the Sprout Pro by HP 3D scanning and printing platform.

Students who create 3D objects via software tools can get their designs printed on HP Multi Jet Fusion printers and shipped to them by HP 3D print partner Shapeways.

The goal is to help get more STEAM (science, technology engineering, art and design, and math) curricula into classrooms, so that students—especially girls—can master 3D design, modeling and printing skills through project-based learning.  

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“3D printers and 3D scanners are really incredible tools for STEAM education, but we have to get this into classrooms at a really early age otherwise we miss the opportunity for engagement,” Somersall said. “We are trying to have a range of class content so nobody feels excluded.”

KiraKira3D learners can create a variety of things, including space-inspired decor, sunglasses, household objects, tabletop games, and through the company’s “fashioneer” series, designer jewelry. The video lessons—most of which feature female instructors who are engineers, animators, designers, architects and computer scientists—teach basics in Autodesk TinkerCAD and Maya, Fusion 360, Solidworks, Rhino 3D and other design, animation and 3D modeling software.

“Our instructors lead students through a creative process with design thinking, and produce something really compelling at the end of the lesson,” Somersall said. “We are trying to blend art and engineering skills while also getting the students comfortable with making mistakes or going off on their own and put their own twist on a design.”

The customization possibilities makes KiraKira3D’s approach a good fit for Sprout Pro by HP, which is uniquely suited for education, tinkering and experimentation. Dubbed an Immersive Computing platform, Sprout Pro blurs the barriers between the physical and digital worlds by way of a fully-functional PC and built-in cameras and projectors that enable 2D and 3D scanning and image manipulation – right from the desktop.Second-generation Sprout Pro by HPSecond-generation Sprout Pro by HP

 “HP’s collaboration with KiraKira3D will bring new learning opportunities to millions of students with a special emphasis on inspiring women and girls to engage in STEM-related activities,” said Gus Schmedlen, vice president of education at HP. “KiraKira3D’s instructional videos and hands-on experiences using the latest HP Immersive and Multi Jet Fusion Technologies will empower students to master the skills needed for the jobs of the future.”

HP and KiraKira3D are developing a series of 10 video lessons for Sprout Pro by HP that are set to be available for free next month on KiraKira3D.com.

KiraKira3D and HP share a common vision for 3D printing and see its potential to disrupt manufacturing, retail and ushers in an era of consumer customization.

“Democratizing access to these types of skills is increasingly important as 3D printing becomes more ubiquitous,” Somersall said. “We are really excited to see the things our students will create.”

Published: June 06, 2017

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The OMEN by HP lineup of gaming notebooks, desktops and accessories is getting leveled up this summer with a slew of new devices outfitted with all of the latest specs.

But the real surprise comes with the revolutionary re-think of its design, with the growing OMEN family getting a top-to-bottom revamp.

“The gaming industry has evolved and its users have grown a sensitivity to not only to performance and design, but to the total experience of their device,” said James Cha, industrial designer, consumer notebook and desktops at HP. “They want to look at it as a trophy piece when it’s sitting on their desk.”

HP had leveraged existing computers and outfitted them with gaming-ready parts on past iterations. But it’s changed tack to focus exclusively on the needs of gamers, with inspiring design and functional features that set the newest OMEN products apart.

The reinvented OMEN lineup not only brings best-in-class performance to casual, eSports, VR and immersive gaming experiences, they feature improved thermals, distinguished industrial design and user-friendly innovations.

Redesigned OMEN by HP Desktop.Redesigned OMEN by HP Desktop.“You really have got to listen to gamers when designing products for them,” Cha said. “They are sophisticated consumers who look at how the product is built, the story behind it, and how it meets their preferences for everyday use.”

Top priority for HP was designing for OMEN devices that not only looked cool, but run cool.  

"Instead of taking an existing chassis and building around its constraints, we started with the thermals and built a chassis to house them,” said John Ludwig, gaming and VR product manager at HP. “By redesigning the layout of the machine, we can greatly increase the airflow, which has a big impact on performance.”

Take, for example the OMEN by HP Desktop, which features fighter jet-like notched corners that give it an angular, forward-leaning look. Not only does it have a different profile than other gaming towers, those angular chevron cutouts enable more air intake and improve ventilation.

“The goal was for this thing to run nearly-silent and much quieter than our competitors,” he said. “Gamers want to push the limits on their GPU and CPU without the fans running loud.”

The desktop also has a number of other thoughtful features, including a carrying handle that’s designed to let gamers tote their rigs to friends’ houses for competitions and also a cleverly angled set of hidden double doors for easy access to the hard drives.

OMEN Compact Desktop with dock. Photo credit: The VergeOMEN Compact Desktop with dock. Photo credit: The VergeThermals also figure into the recently unveiled consumer version of HP’s virtual reality backpack, the OMEN X Compact Desktop, which until now has been marketed as a backpack and only been available in a developer kit.

It puts a gaming PC on the user’s back and pairs with a VR headset, offering enthusiasts an untethered, more immersive experience by enabling the player free movement away from the snaking cables of a hefty gaming rig or TV.

HP took feedback from users and reduced the pack’s weight and redesigned the straps to be more ergonomic. The newer design maintains airflow between the device and the user’s back to prevent the wearer from getting too warm.

HP also boosted its performance with an Intel Core i7 processor and added a small form-factor docking solution for customers that wanted to use the VR pack as their main PC. The VR pack pairs with an HTC Vive headset and also the HP Windows Mixed Reality Headset, which is sold as a developer’s kit.

OMEN by HP Accelerator connects to a notebook via Thunderbolt 3.OMEN by HP Accelerator connects to a notebook via Thunderbolt 3.New to the lineup is an external GPU dock, OMEN by HP Accelerator, which zeroes in on PC gaming via Thunderbolt 3 connectivity. The accelerator is paired with a (non-gaming) notebook PC for ultimate versatility. It can also accommodate nearly all of the graphics cards on the market today and pairs with any HP laptop or other Thunderbolt 3-certified notebook.

“You get the best of both worlds: An amazingly mobile notebook for everyday tasks, and high-end graphics processing power to play games when you dock,” Ludwig said.

For the revamped OMEN devices, it was important that smallest details weren’t overlooked.

“We wanted to make sure every, single part you see is a curated experience,” Cha said. “All of the internal components, even down to the littlest sockets, are accounted for in terms of. Gamers appreciate that they are buying a machine where everything inside is built for them.” 

For a full rundown of all things OMEN by HP, visit hp.com.OMEN family shot banner.jpg

 

 

Published: May 05, 2017

Sprout Pro by HPSprout Pro by HP

 Educators and policy-makers know that personal technology and broadband access are game-changers when it comes to improving outcomes for students – but far too many of the schools they attend lack the resources to provide them. 

But for students who face significant challenges in their home lives, access to technology inside the classroom can help bridge the digital divide.

It’s one of the reasons why HP, a longtime-player in education technology, announced today it will launch a long-term HP Chromebook x360 Education EditionHP Chromebook x360 Education Editiontechnology partnership with the Graham School, a program of the nonprofit Graham Windham.

HP is gifting each of the students and their teachers with top-of-the-line HP Chromebook x360 Education Edition convertible laptops and outfitting the school’s basement into a 21st Century “maker” lab with an HP Learning Studio that features a Dremel 3D printer and the innovative Sprout Pro by HP immersive workstation.

These technologies will not only help teachers improve their skills, gain time back in the classroom and draw from a wider variety of teaching tools, it’s also set to benefit the students who need the most support: the 300 at-risk students from socio-economically challenged neighborhoods the New York City metropolitan area and often have huge gaps in their education due to poverty, addiction, foster care and other hardships.  

“By empowering every student and teacher with personal technology, it opens up a new possibilities for collaboration and skill-building for the future,” said Gus Schmedlen, head of HP’s education vertical. “They will be entering a workforce where to be successful, they’ll need to work collaboratively and be able to transition from the analog to the digital worlds seamlessly. This gift aims to shrink the achievement gap and offer opportunities to come out of school with these skills in hand.”

 Moving the project forward

The donation from HP isn’t just a corporate “feel-good” moment for the Administrators and officials from the Graham School  and Greenburgh-Graham Union Free School District gathering to mark HP's technology gift.Administrators and officials from the Graham School and Greenburgh-Graham Union Free School District gathering to mark HP's technology gift.company and the brand – HP is in it for the long haul. It has partnered with Hewlett-Packard Enterprise, MRA, Intel and Digital Promise to ensure the success of the tech overhaul, including offering change management consulting, professional development and training, and ongoing support.

“They are going from a technology drought to a very rich, collaborative environment,” Schmedlen said. “This is a long-term relationship for HP.”

HP, in turn, will study the effects of the technology interventions with a rigorous longitudinal study that aims to track and report how student performance changes over time, and also determine if there are school-wide lifts in standardized test scores, graduation rates, college acceptances and other measurable improvements.

“Because each student will have a digital footprint, we can collect evidence and learn where they are strong and where they might need more help,” Schmedlen said. “By going from analog learning to digital, we can use data to create predictive intelligence to improve student outcomes.”

 

The Graham SchoolThe Graham SchoolThe Hamilton connection

HP’s technology donation was the result of outreach by Graham Windham Leadership Council Honorary Chair Luis Miranda Jr. to HP Chief Marketing Officer Antonio Lucio.

“I have seen a lot of corporate donations, but this is different,” Miranda said. “The HP team has created an implementation plan that will upgrade the school’s infrastructure to support the new technology, train teachers in the software, and develop metrics that will be measured over time, in addition to the donation of the most up-to-date tech. What I see from these efforts is that HP feels that Graham Windham has as much to teach them as they have to teach the school.”

Miranda became an active supporter of Graham Windham following the strong partnership developed with the organization by his son, composer and actor Lin-Manuel Miranda and the cast of his Broadway mega-hit, Hamilton: An American Musical

“My hope is that one day the Graham Windham programs will not be in such need as they are now, but until then, I look forward to seeing children thrive in the program through the loving care and guidance of the teachers there, and supported by efforts of corporations like HP,” Miranda said.

In 1805, Eliza Hamilton established Graham Windham as the first private orphanage in New York City in honor of her husband, Alexander Hamilton.

“We are extremely pleased to partner with Graham Windham to help reinvent the classroom and keep Eliza Hamilton’s legacy alive,” said Lucio. “Education is a strategic and special market for HP.  By studying the unique needs of students, teachers and administrators, we design education technology solutions to help schools enable the next generation of inventors, leaders, and artists. We are so grateful for this partnership with the Miranda family.”

Published: April 25, 2017

HP's updated lineup of fourth-generation ZBook Mobile Workstations.HP's updated lineup of fourth-generation ZBook Mobile Workstations. While most people still think about VR as being about the hardware – like Samsung Gear VR or Oculus – it’s the content that will really matter in the long run.

That means that game designers, animators, filmmakers and graphics professionals need to be ready with powerful tools in their back pocket to meet what’s projected to be a $41 billion market for global VR content creation.

HP, the leader in the fast-growing professional workstation market, recognizes the unique needs of digital creators who rely on powerful mobile workstations to support today’s graphically intense content creation projects.  

HP's 4th-gen ZBook 17HP's 4th-gen ZBook 17At NAB Show this week during the launch of HP’s 4th generation ZBook Mobile Workstations family, HP unleashed its first Virtual Reality (VR)-ready mobile workstation: the HP ZBook 17, which aims to help designers meet rapidly growing demand for VR content.

Last year, the number of global downloads of VR games and apps from Google Play and the App Stores totaled 226 million, representing a 276 percent year-over-year explosion from 2015, according to recent Sensor Tower Store Intelligence data. In the first quarter of 2017 alone, mobile VR software downloads across both platforms totaled more than 85 million worldwide, a 205 percent year-over-year increase.  

A scene from "Henry," by Oculus Story Studio, one of first original characters entirely designed for VR viewing.A scene from "Henry," by Oculus Story Studio, one of first original characters entirely designed for VR viewing.The entertainment industry has been warming up to VR lately, too. This year’s Tribeca Film Festival was reportedly set to include VR projects tied to director Kathryn Bigelow, musicians John Legend and Pharrell Williams and producer Megan Ellison. And last year, an Oculus VR film called “Henry” managed to take home an Emmy.

For its part, HP is delivering the tools to help digital designers pursue that opportunity – now. Creators can configure the ZBook 17 with optimal horsepower, select one of two NVDIA graphics cards (the P4000 or P5000) and be assured of an ultra-smooth 90 FPS (frames per second) experience.

Beyond its VR capabilities, the ZBook 17 shares numerous important innovations found in the other 4th generation mobile workstations, including: HP ZBook 14u and 15u models; HP ZBook 15; and the top-of-the-line HP ZBook Studio.

For example, because client security continues to (or should) be a major concern for digital creators everywhere, HP re-invented its 4th generation lineup to be the industry’s most secure and manageable workstations. Each workstation offers unique security features, such as: HP Sure Start Gen3, the industry’s first-self healing PC BIOS with comprehensive encryption, strong authentication, malware protection, data protection, identity assurance and threat detection and response.

ZBook Mobile Workstations also come preloaded with HP Remote Graphics Software for remote collaboration HP Performance Advisor for optimal performance and HP Velocity for reliable and fast network performance.

 With HP taking the lead, workstations have undergone a complete change and emerged as tools that many industries use to produce mind-blowing visual content.

Best of NAB award.jpgThe entertainment industry is at the forefront of this trend, and HP workstations have played a central role in creating some of the most magical scenes in memorable Hollywood blockbusters, such as, "Hugo,” “Shrek,” “How to Train Your Dragon,” Spider-Man 3” and all “Pirates of the Caribbean” movies.

This year at NAB, the HP ZBook 17 was awarded the "Best of NAB" by Videomaker magazine. 

To learn more about HP ZBook Mobile Workstations, visit HP's website. The NAB show continues through April 27th in Las Vegas.