HP newsroom blog
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Published: June 12, 2017

Still from Dads and Daughters vid.png

 

A good role model is hard to find – and that’s especially true if you’re a woman in the technology industry.

Role modeling, along with tackling unconscious bias in hiring and investing in programs to widen the pipeline of women in technical positions, is of course part of a well-rounded strategy for leveling the playing field.

Of those strategies, role modeling is probably the trickiest to execute well. But as we’re learning at HP, where I’m head of diversity and inclusion, it doesn’t have to be that way. 

Forbes logo.jpgThis week I’ll take the stage at the Forbes Women’s Summit in New York, where, on a panel with my colleague Stephanie Dismore, we'll aim to break down some of the misconceptions about role modeling and share what is working at HP.

At its core, good role modeling revolves around trust. Not only does it require trust between individuals, it also requires an organization that fosters frank conversations, openness and the ability to meet people where they are.

That’s evident when your company actively seeks out ways to become a “speak up” culture, as we are working to do at HP. It’s enabling women to have courageous conversations – especially about the unique challenges they face in the tech workforce – and talk about barriers to their success.

Among those barriers: Outdated advice that recruiters and hiring experts might bring to the table when considering female candidates. These damaging stereotypes are among the raw, emotional sticking points in the video below, unveiled today as part of HP’s ongoing “Reinvent Mindsets” campaign. It features heartfelt conversations between fathers and their young adult daughters, who together confront some of the blatantly sexist hiring practices that still threaten to hold women back.

There are other sociological barriers, especially in the often insular bubble of Silicon Valley.

People tend to hire what feels familiar – a bias that gives preference (whether overt or unconsciously) to people who look, speak and think like them. What we have been pushing for at HP is learning to recognize and remove this type of affinity bias to help diversify our ranks.

Another win for tackling affinity bias: Removing it helps give women of color, especially black women in technology, an entry point that that they have often been denied. The same goes for women who hail from cultural, social and religious backgrounds that have been “othered” in tech.

Still more barriers arise years before women are thinking about entering in the workforce, as young students entering higher education flee the hard sciences. The recent groundswell of interest in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) learning, as well as tech-ed focused organizations and nonprofits, shows that there’s still a critical need to build the pipeline of girls and women with technical talent.

One of the things we’re very passionate about as a company is to be able to partner with STEM and educational programs, such as Black Girls Code, that are impacting the lives of underrepresented youth.

It’s one of the reasons HP awarded Chief Executive Officer and Founder of Black Girls Code Kimberly Bryant, our inaugural Diversity Champion Award at the Forbes Women’s Summit this week.CEO and Founder of Black Girls Code, Kimberly Bryant.CEO and Founder of Black Girls Code, Kimberly Bryant.

Her organization, which has scaled up from the Bay Area to have satellites all over the country, aims to provide African-American youth with the skills to occupy some of the 1.4 million computing job openings expected to be available in the U.S. by 2020.

More black women in technical positions holds space for girls looking to succeed in the industry, just by making sure that there are people who look like them to emulate. Bryant’s done a phenomenal job of inspiring and engaging girls to learn computer programming skills and as she puts it, “become builders of their own futures.” There’s something incredibly powerful about internalizing the message: “She looks like me, and she’s succeeding.”

 While HP and others in the tech industry are actively working to knock down some of these barriers to inclusion and diversity, there is a lot more work that needs to be done to cultivate role models for women at their respective companies.

When I think of successful role modeling, I think of the “growth mindset” that HP is adopting as it builds its corporate culture. This mindset is critical to the success of creating a place where women can bring all of who they are to work. Without it, we lose out on greater opportunities to innovate, to develop leaders and yes – to grow our bottom line.

Here’s a rundown of some of our best practices:

1) Build networks of trust where women can get to know each other. Networks of trust enable role models to share and be open. Building out women’s power circles and affinity groups enables real sharing of their hopes, their dreams about the future and their passions. It helps role models become authentic cheerleaders by enabling them to sponsor, mentor and coach others.

2) It is not only a woman's responsibility to be a role models. If every employee brought someone else in who is from an underrepresented group, we would speed up the trajectory of change. The model we have at HP is an “everybody in” culture – it is everyone’s responsibility to coach, to mentor and to lead.  We celebrate leaders at all levels. That’s especially important for our male allies to understand.

3) Company leadership must walk the walk. None of these efforts matter unless there is demand for change at the top. Our diversity and inclusion efforts at HP are backed up and amplified by leaders such as Chief Legal Officer Kim Rivera and Chief Marketing Officer Antonio Lucio, who are using their voices and influence to make change in their industries by demanding that outside vendors, partners and agencies working with HP meet certain standards for diversity.

To learn more about HP’s Global Diversity and Inclusion efforts, visit the company’s website and follow me on Twitter. Follow along with the Forbes Women’s Summit, which continues through June 13, with the hashtag #redefinepower.

    Awards + Recognition Leadership
Published: August 28, 2017

Dion Weisler, CEO, HP, Inc., and  Punit Renjen, CEO, Deloitte GlobalDion Weisler, CEO, HP, Inc., and Punit Renjen, CEO, Deloitte Global

Steam. Electricity. Automation. Each fueled an industrial revolution that changed how humans live and work. The Fourth Industrial Revolution will surpass all previous ones in size, shape, scope, and more importantly, complexity. Now, HP and Deloitte will accelerate this revolution through an unprecedented partnership.

Last week, HP and Deloitte hosted an event at HP’s Palo Alto headquarters to announce a major strategic alliance to digitally transform the $12 trillion global manufacturing industry. The partnership will bring together HP’s groundbreaking Multi Jet Fusion 3D printing solutions and unique partner ecosystem, with Deloitte’s global client reach, deep manufacturing relationships, and expertise in supply chain transformation.  

“Nothing’s really changed much in terms of manufacturing in almost 100 years. And it’s time, because there is a better mousetrap. There is a meaningful way to make a very broad impact on the way companies all around the world design, procure, manufacture, and deliver their products to customers,” said HP CEO Dion Weisler.

This digital industrial revolution will fundamentally change how the world designs, produces, distributes, and experiences everything. And the implications are astonishing: the World Economic Forum has estimated the benefit of this digital transformation the benefit of this digital transformation across the world’s largest industries—automotive, aerospace, medical technology, electronics, consumer goods, engineering, heavy industry—to business and society at $100 trillion over the next 10 years alone.

Weisler joined Deloitte Global Chief Executive Officer Punit Renjen to describe how a new wave of disruptive technologies—from artificial intelligence to robotics to big data to the Internet of Things—are driving unprecedented change in the world. Yet much of the world’s manufacturing systems have remained stuck in the analog era, tied to outdated thinking, tools, and processes that have become resource-intensive and economically inefficient.
Gil Perez, SVP, IoT and Distributed Manufacturing, SAP; Bob Jones, EVP , Global Sales and Services, Siemens ; Joe Sendra, VP Manufacturing/Technology, Johnson & Johnson; Doug Gish, Manufacturing Strategy Leader, Deloitte; Michelle Bockman (moderator), Global Head of 3D Printing Commercial Expansion & Development, HP Inc.Gil Perez, SVP, IoT and Distributed Manufacturing, SAP; Bob Jones, EVP , Global Sales and Services, Siemens ; Joe Sendra, VP Manufacturing/Technology, Johnson & Johnson; Doug Gish, Manufacturing Strategy Leader, Deloitte; Michelle Bockman (moderator), Global Head of 3D Printing Commercial Expansion & Development, HP Inc.This is the massive opportunity for 3D printing: to unleash entirely new ways of making things to befit our all-digital future, making life better for everyone, everywhere. This new manufacturing model will unlock unmatched economic potential, enabling capital to be redeployed to new areas, shortening supply chains, reducing carbon emissions, and eliminating production waste and inventory.

A highlight of the event was a panel, led by Michelle Bockman, HP’s new Global Head of 3D Printing Commercial Expansion & Development, and featuring manufacturing leaders from SAP, Siemens, Johnson & Johnson, and Deloitte. A technology showcase displayed innovative new parts produced by HP’s 3D printing solutions.

 

Watch the announcement.

Watch the panel discussion.

Learn more about HP 3D printing and printing solutions.

Published: August 25, 2017

Bob Jones, Executive VP of global sales, marketing and services, Siemens PLM SoftwareBob Jones, Executive VP of global sales, marketing and services, Siemens PLM Software

Bob Jones, Executive VP of global sales, marketing and services for Siemens PLM Software, was among the leaders who participated in an industry panel during yesterday’s announcement of HP’s new strategic alliance with Deloitte, the worldwide leader in professional services and digital supply chain transformations, aimed at accelerating the digital transformation of the $12 trillion global manufacturing industry with HP’s groundbreaking 3D printing solutions.

We caught up with Bob to learn how Siemens is transforming the global manufacturing industry with digitalization and additive manufacturing.

 

Q. What is Siemens’ perspective on the analog-to-digital transformation that is upon us?

A. It’s important to understand the distinction between “digitization” and “digitalization.” It’s the difference between taking an analog process and using digital technologies to mimic it for efficiency gains – and leveraging digital data to fundamentally transform processes, leading to more opportunities for disruptive innovation and new business models.

Digitalization is changing our daily lives, transforming entire industries and revolutionizing the global economy. The products we use every day, how they are produced and the enterprises that produce them will be dramatically changed by digitalization.

Today's market-leading companies are already seizing opportunities created by digitalization to accelerate innovation, employ new business models, and respond to dynamic customer and market demands with greater speed, agility, quality and at less cost.

 

Q. What does this transformation mean for companies that design and create?

A. Every company is on its own unique digital journey and is looking to digitalization to create differentiating value for its customers. Companies of all sizes are transforming into digital enterprises that produce smart, individualized products augmented by a digital communication language enabling innovative data-driven services and support.

Digital enterprises are thriving by digitally linking their product development and production operations to customers and global supply chain networks, which is changing the way ideas come to life and the way products and factories are utilized. 

Firewire Surfboards, a small-sized surfboard manufacturer in Carlsbad, Calif., is a customer that we've helped to innovate the next generation of surfboards. Firewire is using the power of digitalization to revolutionize the surfing experience by constructing performance-engineered and eco-friendly surfboards individually tuned to each customer’s surfing style and needs.

Newport News Shipbuilding is another example of how our customers are undergoing a digital transformation. Newport News is leveraging 3D model data as the foundation for a “drawingless ship” that can be built and maintained through electronic work instructions on tablets.

 

Q. What role does additive manufacturing play in Siemens’ vision for the future? 

A. Additive manufacturing is a disruptive force that is reshaping the way digital enterprises conceive, design, produce, distribute and service products. With additive manufacturing, companies are reimagining products that perform better, have more strength, less weight and are individualized to a customer’s personal needs – and are realizing these products on-demand and without the need for long lead-time and expensive tooling.

Siemens uses additive manufacturing for industrial production and we provide market-leading software and production automation solutions for our customers. Siemens manufacturing divisions are already making breakthroughs in the areas of designing components with performance-enhancing complex internal geometry that can only be 3D printed, dramatically reducing lead-time (for example, Siemens gas turbine burner), 3D printing spare parts on-demand, and the streamlining of supply chains.

However, while additive manufacturing is proving to create business value, gaps in the value chain must be closed in order to scale-up its use for mass industrial production. Costly data conversions between software applications, uncontrolled data and process steps, scarce expertise, and 3D printers stranded on islands are just some of the gaps that must be addressed in order to advance additive manufacturing into mainstream product development, production and business operations. 

Our vision at Siemens is to industrialize additive manufacturing by enabling control of the complete process via a connected and continuous digital thread from concept to finished 3D printed part and extending into field use. We’re delivering on our vision by offering integrated additive manufacturing software solutions for all primary design, engineering, manufacturing planning and production functions – an end-to-end product development system underpinned by digital twins, production automation hardware, expertise, and a vibrant ecosystem of partners and customers.

 

Q. How does the collaboration between Siemens and HP play a role in Siemens’ vision for additive manufacturing?

A. We recognize that Siemens cannot industrialize additive manufacturing and transform the global manufacturing industry alone. Siemens and HP have a long-standing relationship and we share a vision for helping our customers compete by taking a comprehensive and integrated end-to-end approach to industrialize additive manufacturing - and to transform products and how they are made.

We believe HP 3D printing technology with Multi Jet Fusion and voxel-level control need modern digital design and production automation tools to unlock the full power of the technology – and scale-up additive manufacturing for the industrial mass production – and we look forward to continuing to work with HP to realize our shared vision.

 

About Bob Jones

Robert Jones is executive vice president of global sales, marketing and services for Siemens PLM Software, a business unit of the Siemens Digital Factory Division. He and his team are responsible for the company’s sales, marketing and service delivery on a global basis. He works in partnership with Siemens PLM Software’s zone sales leaders to aggressively target geographic, industry and strategic corporate opportunities. Prior to his current position Jones was senior vice president and managing director of the Americas with responsibility for sales, sales support and services delivery in North and South America.

Before assuming his Americas role, Jones led sales, sales support and services delivery for Siemens PLM Software’s U.S. organization and prior to that, was responsible for the company’s global General Motors account. Throughout his career with Siemens, Jones has held a number of leadership roles in both sales and marketing. His responsibilities have included direct and indirect sales and marketing strategies for the PLM portfolio to the automotive OEM and supplier industry.

Before joining Siemens PLM Software as an account executive, Robert began his career in product development at Johnson Controls, Automotive Systems Group (JCI/ASG). During his tenure at JCI/ASG, he was a chief engineer responsible for mechanism programs to OEMs in America, Asia and Europe.

Jones has a master's degree in Mechanical Engineering from Virginia Polytechnic University and a bachelor's degree in Mechanical Engineering from Western Michigan University.

Robert and his wife, Holly, reside in Northville, Michigan, with their four sons.

Published: August 07, 2017

As HP continues its journey to reinvent the global manufacturing industry, it is critical to have visionary and experienced leaders charting the way. Michelle Bockman, former executive vice president at GE Digital, recently joined HP to lead its 3D printing market expansion efforts.

At GE, Bockman most recently led the company’s ambitious strategy to build a software-driven digital future for large industrial customers. With more than 20 years of experience in a wide range of functions and industries, she’s led global operations, managed engineering, driven sales and marketing, built new digital businesses – even ran an industrial manufacturing plant.

Michelle BockmanMichelle BockmanBockman’s diverse experience gives her a fresh perspective on unlocking new value for customers who are reinventing their operations. We caught up with her to learn more about keys to driving the digital industrial transformation of production.

 

Q. Why did you choose this time to join HP?

A. We’re on the cusp of a new industrial revolution that could be greater than anything we’ve ever seen – ubiquitous connectivity, AI, robotics, the internet of things, 3D printing and more are all converging to drive unprecedented social and economic change. HP plays a central role in this revolution and is really leading the way with innovations in 3D printing, blended reality and other technologies businesses are embracing in their digital reinventions. Put this all together and we are poised to transform some of the largest industries on the face of the earth.

This is the place to be if you want to profoundly change the way people live, work and interact with one another. HP is one of the founders of Silicon Valley and has a strong heritage of reinvention which, quite frankly, also appealed to my entrepreneurial spirit. I can’t tell you how excited I am about this adventure in innovation. 

 

Q. Tell us about your new role leading the expansion of 3D Printing for HP. Where will you be focused?

A. To grossly oversimplify, I have a broad responsibility to expand the overall 3D printing market for HP in partnership with our foundational customers, strategic partners, and materials ecosystem, and drive the development of new digital services for the 3D printing business. What this really means is focusing on customer outcomes by working deeply with market leaders such as BMW, Jabil, Johnson & Johnson, and Nike as they embrace 3D printing to transform their businesses, and applying these lessons learned to the entirety of our product portfolio, so we can really accelerate development of new applications and services. 

It also means leading our global strategic alliances with SIs and software partners, and to drive our open materials strategy with the largest chemical companies on earth, as we’ll need to leverage the world to transform a $12 trillion industry. Finally, no digital industrial transformation is complete without developing the next generation of connected, digital services that unlock unique insights and value for our customers and partners.  

Q. As a longtime industry veteran, where do you see the greatest opportunities for change?

A. 3D printing technology has been around awhile, but it’s poised for a real breakout. The combination of new technology such as HP’s Multi Jet Fusion, which is up to 10 times faster and half the cost of other systems, plus the radical expansion of new materials with a simultaneous plummet in cost due to our open materials platform, means the economic promise of 3D printing is finally ready to deliver. This is no longer technology just for prototyping or the R&D team. This is a platform for large-scale industrial production. 
Couple the continued march of those innovations with the larger digital transformation unfolding across the entire design, production, and distribution workflow, and you have a massive opportunity to help companies innovate faster, be more agile in their manufacturing, and implement more flexible supply chains. This unlocks huge economic opportunity, new business models, and competitive advantage. I believe that those who invest in digital transformation will reap the rewards, and we are just scratching the surface of what this reinvention means for some of the largest companies and industries in the world.

Q. You’ve led a diverse range of functions over your career.  What else can you share with us from your journey?

A. I like to solve really hard problems with smart, curious and passionate people in industries that are changing the world. That’s what drew me to mechanical engineering in college and continues to drive me today. Over the course of my career, I’ve been lucky enough to experience many facets of businesses – from leading large organizations through change to developing new products and services to direct and daily interaction with the customer. At the end of the day what we do really matters if it delivers value to our customers and, in my mind, also delivers value to the world at large. I couldn’t be more thrilled to be part of the HP 3D printing team, which is striving to achieve exactly those goals.

Published: April 26, 2017

 

@HP_Twitter_Mindset_A.jpg

At HP, we believe in the power and promise of committing to a more diverse and inclusive workplace. And we’re proud of the progress we’ve made, with the most diverse board of directors of any technology company, among other things, and the awards and recognition we’ve won because of it.

But we are far from satisfied.

That’s why we’re continuing our efforts and literally reinventing the standard for diversity and inclusion at HP. We are not merely correcting the underrepresentation of women, people of color and other minorities in our workforce and among our partners and suppliers, we are creating models of behavior – and role models.

We call this new journey "Reinvent Mindsets" because we want to make it clear that just as our business reinvents how our customers live, work and play; we are also reinventing how we think about diversity and inclusion. Reinvent Mindsets comprises ongoing internal training, new measurement tools and other efforts, but focuses on two areas we think haven’t gotten the attention they deserve.

 

Tackling unconscious bias

First, we’ve come to see that a major barrier to attracting and retaining a diverse team is what’s called unconscious bias – those split-second impressions made by our brains about race, gender, sexual orientation, religion, nationality and many other characteristics, that impact how we view and respond to people. We’re usually not even aware we’ve made an assumption about a person, let alone how these perceptions drive our behavior and decisions. But we all do it. The good news is, that once we’re made aware of these biases, we can take concrete steps to reverse them.

We want to bring attention to unconscious bias at HP, especially among our leaders, hiring managers and talent acquisition team. It’s one of the reasons why the Reinvent Mindsets campaign includes a provocative video series that shines a light on how minorities and others can become casualties of unconscious bias. The first is here. We hope you’ll share it far and wide to advance the conversation about these human biases and their toll.

 Second, to make sure that as we contemplate our next generation of talent that we are reaching new places to find them.  It’s why we’re partnering with historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs) in a unique business school competition to provide promising students hands-on experience with us. We are excited about investing in the future.

 

Embedding Reinvent Mindsets into our DNA

Here’s what Reinvent Mindsets is not: an initiative that’s here today, gone tomorrow. Instead, it is an idea and endeavor that will be embedded throughout HP, woven into the very fabric of who we are, into our DNA. 

"Reinvent Mindsets" – as well as HP’s reinvented mindset – is our future.

It is what will allow our team members to be their authentic selves. And, crucially, it is what will allow HP to become an authentically global, authentically fair, open-minded and welcoming place that not only embraces divergent opinions and ways of doing things, but eagerly seeks them out. Only then – by ensuring a diverse workforce whose members feel they belong, that they are an equal part of something big and are integral to our success – will we be able to remain an industry leader in technology. The results of this kind of thinking will be more creativity, more ingenuity, more curiosity, more inventiveness, more authenticity, more ideas, more learning, more sharing, more fun and more innovation.

At HP, we are working toward a day when the most important numbers are not about headcount, but, by Reinvent Mindsets, about how many innovations we’ve introduced, how many have been embraced by the public and how many are driving positive change throughout the world.