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Published: February 14, 2017

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Consumers are familiar with the nefarious ways that hackers can infiltrate their technology. From viruses and malware to breaches of confidential data and identity theft – they are aware of the security risks that come with connecting to any type of networked device.

What they might not know, however, is that they are more likely to expose themselves and their employers to costly cyberattacks by using IT-issued PCs and printers than they are to have sensitive information stolen by an anonymous hacker.

Aging PCs with third-party security software and unsecured shared printers are particularly vulnerable “blind spots” in enterprise networks, explains Vikrant Batra, Global Head of Marketing for Imaging and Printing at HP.

In fact, just two percent of the hundreds of millions of printers deployed in offices around the world have any type of security measures in place. 

The_Wolf_MovierPoster_LR_tcm245_2402995_tcm245_2403004_tcm245-2402995.jpg“The printers in today’s enterprise environments are as sophisticated as any computing device,” Batra says. “Hackers can pull data from a printer’s hard drive, or get access to your company’s network. And how many times have you walked by the printer and seen printouts with sensitive information just sitting there?”

 

Meet “The Wolf”

One way HP is getting the word out about this major corporate blind spot is by teaming up with actor Christian Slater for a new, branded short film series that debuted today called “The Wolf.” 

Watch the full series hereThe Wolf Starring Christian Slater | HP Studios

“The Wolf” highlights the ease with which skillful cybercriminals can hack corporate networks. In the serialized short films, Slater riffs on his role as a hacker in the award-winning TV series “Mr. Robot” and systematically infiltrates a company entirely through vulnerabilities in unprotected printers and PCs. Starting in the mailroom and moving up to the executive boardroom, he breaches a fictional company’s most sensitive data via an abandoned printout, the printer interface, and even an innocently downloaded gift certificate.

It’s the everyday-ness of these actions that make them so dangerous, Batra notes. 

“We really want to connect with IT decision makers, CIOs, and CISOs and engage this audience with a message that they’ll pay attention to,” he says. “It’s extremely important to have all aspects of the ecosystem secured.”The Wolf Boardroom.jpg

At HP, that means designing industry-leading hardware and software solutions with innovative features across multiple levels of security. In HP’s printers, that includes the Jet Advantage Security Manager, secure boot-up, firmware validation, and run-time code protections while HP’s lineup of business PCs deploys HP Sure Click, HP Sure View, and HP Sure Start Gen3. Together, these built-in protections enable HP to offer the most secure PCs and printers in the world.

HP is also working to continually improve security for what Batra calls the “three Ds” — data, document, and device.

“We want to secure all of them,” he said. “If you have HP security, you are in really good hands.”

To learn more, visit  www.hp.com/TheWolf and follow @HPBusiness.

    Desktop Computing Enterprise Printing
Published: July 25, 2017

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Let’s face it, while making compromises might build good moral fiber, it’s usually not much fun. Thankfully, the new HP Pavilion All-In-Ones makes having it all seem easy. How? HP has added a slew of its premium product features into the new Pavilion lineup.Moscato_R_Hero_FrontLeft_KBMouse.jpg

Today, the company announced a pair of revamped Pavilion All-in-One (AiO) devices just in time for the back-to-school spree. Pitched as the magnet that draws the family together, the new devices have perks for parents and kids as do-all, no-compromise PCs. Parents can listen to music, get news, pull up recipes, pay bills, and watch favorite shows. Kids can do homework, create videos and edit and share photos. Family movie night becomes an immersive entertainment experience on the Pavilion AiO. 

“We listened to our customers when redesigning the HP Pavilion All-in-One to ensure we’re bringing features consumers crave, making it the perfect overall family PC,” said Kevin Frost, vice president and general manager, Consumer Personal Systems, Displays & Accessories at HP. “It’s a powerful desktop that can handle whatever a family wants to do—connect, work, create, or consume—while the architecturally-inspired design packs style and personality to make it a home-enhancing investment.”

 

Premium features

Just-right 24” or 27” edge-to-edge full HD, in-plane switching (IPS) screens serve up crisp text, sharp images, and vibrant photos. A fabric overlay on the speakers, and audio custom-tuned by B&O Play provide more acoustic transparency for a richer, clearer, immersive sound. And staying closely connected has never been so simple or fun. Post, chat, like, stream and share—across the globe or down the hall.

You can finally remove that unsightly tape or sticky note from your webcamnow, there’s a better way. Returning to this generation of All-in-Ones is HP’s privacy cameras, a must-have feature for the many customers who cite privacy as an important concern, especially with kids in the house. HP included a webcam that safely tucks out of sight when not in use. An optional infrared camera adds another layer of security with face authentication through Windows Hello.  Privacy camera stows away when not in use.Privacy camera stows away when not in use.

The latest 7th generation Intel Core processor delivers an exceptional level of performance for working, surfing, streaming or creating. Along with the versatility of the Pavilion line, AiO displays are built to last—the die-cast aluminum and metal stand includes a hinge tilt that is tested for the equivalent of three times a day for nine years. It’s not only stylish, but also durable.

And that tilt range goes from -5 degrees to +35 degrees, so it’s easy to find the perfect, neck-friendly view. Expansive touchscreens are a more natural way to interact with your PC, and a more engaging way for kids to learn and connect. Plus, it’s easy to share with HDMI input/output that enables you to add a second monitor or project to your TV.

At only 8.5 mm—approximately 40 percent thinner than the previous generation—this is the slimmest Pavilion All-in-one to date.At only 8.5 mm—approximately 40 percent thinner than the previous generation—this is the slimmest Pavilion All-in-one to date.Talking about multitasking, not only does the Pavilion AiO work hard as the home’s communications and entertainment center, it looks fantastic doing it. At only 8.5mm—approximately 40 percent thinner than the previous generation—this is the slimmest Pavilion All-in-one to date. All the hardware is packed in the bottom, making the display ultra-thin. Although the profile and strategically placed ports keep desks neat, the modern, clean design and fabric accents make it look great in any room of the house.

 

Creation station 

AAA_9294-5-24.jpgGot a casual gamer or budding video creator in the house? Optional AMD Radeon 530 Discrete Graphics and up to 16 GB of memory supply the performance and faster response rate for graphics-intensive activities such as  gaming, and for demanding applications such as photo and video editing.

To improve the experience even more, HP has put extensive customer insights to work, which resulted in minimizing the amount of pre-installed software and desktop clutter. This more streamlined experience translates to improved OS operation and general system performance.

Powered for productivity, created to connect and entertain, and designed to enhance the home, these newly redesigned HP Pavilion All-in-Ones gives consumers tools to do it all, without trade-offs.

For more on the new smart, stylish HP Pavilion All-in-Ones, visit: www.hp.com/go/pavilion-allinone.  

Published: June 06, 2017

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The OMEN by HP lineup of gaming notebooks, desktops and accessories is getting leveled up this summer with a slew of new devices outfitted with all of the latest specs.

But the real surprise comes with the revolutionary re-think of its design, with the growing OMEN family getting a top-to-bottom revamp.

“The gaming industry has evolved and its users have grown a sensitivity to not only to performance and design, but to the total experience of their device,” said James Cha, industrial designer, consumer notebook and desktops at HP. “They want to look at it as a trophy piece when it’s sitting on their desk.”

HP had leveraged existing computers and outfitted them with gaming-ready parts on past iterations. But it’s changed tack to focus exclusively on the needs of gamers, with inspiring design and functional features that set the newest OMEN products apart.

The reinvented OMEN lineup not only brings best-in-class performance to casual, eSports, VR and immersive gaming experiences, they feature improved thermals, distinguished industrial design and user-friendly innovations.

Redesigned OMEN by HP Desktop.Redesigned OMEN by HP Desktop.“You really have got to listen to gamers when designing products for them,” Cha said. “They are sophisticated consumers who look at how the product is built, the story behind it, and how it meets their preferences for everyday use.”

Top priority for HP was designing for OMEN devices that not only looked cool, but run cool.  

"Instead of taking an existing chassis and building around its constraints, we started with the thermals and built a chassis to house them,” said John Ludwig, gaming and VR product manager at HP. “By redesigning the layout of the machine, we can greatly increase the airflow, which has a big impact on performance.”

Take, for example the OMEN by HP Desktop, which features fighter jet-like notched corners that give it an angular, forward-leaning look. Not only does it have a different profile than other gaming towers, those angular chevron cutouts enable more air intake and improve ventilation.

“The goal was for this thing to run nearly-silent and much quieter than our competitors,” he said. “Gamers want to push the limits on their GPU and CPU without the fans running loud.”

The desktop also has a number of other thoughtful features, including a carrying handle that’s designed to let gamers tote their rigs to friends’ houses for competitions and also a cleverly angled set of hidden double doors for easy access to the hard drives.

OMEN Compact Desktop with dock. Photo credit: The VergeOMEN Compact Desktop with dock. Photo credit: The VergeThermals also figure into the recently unveiled consumer version of HP’s virtual reality backpack, the OMEN X Compact Desktop, which until now has been marketed as a backpack and only been available in a developer kit.

It puts a gaming PC on the user’s back and pairs with a VR headset, offering enthusiasts an untethered, more immersive experience by enabling the player free movement away from the snaking cables of a hefty gaming rig or TV.

HP took feedback from users and reduced the pack’s weight and redesigned the straps to be more ergonomic. The newer design maintains airflow between the device and the user’s back to prevent the wearer from getting too warm.

HP also boosted its performance with an Intel Core i7 processor and added a small form-factor docking solution for customers that wanted to use the VR pack as their main PC. The VR pack pairs with an HTC Vive headset and also the HP Windows Mixed Reality Headset, which is sold as a developer’s kit.

OMEN by HP Accelerator connects to a notebook via Thunderbolt 3.OMEN by HP Accelerator connects to a notebook via Thunderbolt 3.New to the lineup is an external GPU dock, OMEN by HP Accelerator, which zeroes in on PC gaming via Thunderbolt 3 connectivity. The accelerator is paired with a (non-gaming) notebook PC for ultimate versatility. It can also accommodate nearly all of the graphics cards on the market today and pairs with any HP laptop or other Thunderbolt 3-certified notebook.

“You get the best of both worlds: An amazingly mobile notebook for everyday tasks, and high-end graphics processing power to play games when you dock,” Ludwig said.

For the revamped OMEN devices, it was important that smallest details weren’t overlooked.

“We wanted to make sure every, single part you see is a curated experience,” Cha said. “All of the internal components, even down to the littlest sockets, are accounted for in terms of. Gamers appreciate that they are buying a machine where everything inside is built for them.” 

For a full rundown of all things OMEN by HP, visit hp.com.OMEN family shot banner.jpg

 

 

Published: May 12, 2017

As I am sure that some of you have read, on May 11, a Swiss cyber-security firm, Modzero AG, released a whitepaper highlighting that a keylogger issue – which in this case, is debug code – that is present in Conexant audio drivers on select HP computers.

At HP, customer security is our top priority, so I wanted to give an update on the issue, what we have done, and our best advice to customers.

First and most importantly, there is a fix for our commercial PCs available on HP.com as of today, May 12, with fixes for all consumer PCs scheduled to be available on May 13. In addition, HP has not had, nor will it have, any access to user data as a result of this issue.

When HP learned about this earlier this month, our Cyber Security team immediately investigated the issue, found the root cause and worked on a fix. In addition to being available on HP.com, we are also in the process of getting it published through Microsoft’s Windows Update Service. This is so customers – especially those with PCs not managed by an IT organization – will get the update automatically. For customers whose PCs are managed by their internal IT team, the update is available for deployment through their standard sets of tools.

As Modzero’s report states, there was a keylogger capability in the Conexant HD audio driver package that is preinstalled on some HP PCs. This capability was created by Conexant during the development process to help debug an audio issue. Adding debug code is a normal part of the development process and such code is supposed to be removed and never included in a commercially available product. Unfortunately, in this case, Conexant did not remove the code. We certainly never intended to include this code in shipped products.

The debug code stores keystrokes in a log file that it creates to help developers diagnose an issue. This code is stored in a file locally on the PC, and then it is cleared out each time the user logs off and whenever the PC is rebooted.

Some media coverage suggested that the log files are sent back to HP. These articles are inaccurate – such information is never sent back to HP. Again, HP never intended to include this functionality in a shipped product used by customers. What is most important to know is that there is an immediate commercial fix available with all consumer fixes available by May 13.

This issue effects certain commercial notebooks and desktop systems manufactured since 2015. In addition, a select set of our consumer systems are effected. For more information on the exact systems that need an update to the audio driver, check out our security advisory.

Our best advice to customers is to install the updated driver package. If you are a consumer customer or a business without a dedicated IT team, we recommend using Window Update to keep your PC updated automatically. For customers with a dedicated IT organization, download the Softpak from HP.com and distribute the updated driver package as you would any other update. Given the nature of this issue, our advice is to deploy this update as quickly as possible.

While HP didn’t create the driver, our job is to keep the customer safe even when the issue is with third-party code. We have learned from this situation and will work to with our partners to further verify the debug code is removed from their software before it goes final. That said, we will also continue to work with the security community to learn about these issues if they do come up, and then work to make sure we can get high quality fixes out to customers as quickly as possible, just as we are doing in this case.

For more information, please read the security advisory available here.

 

Published: April 19, 2017

Android Jones' installation inside the HP Antarctic dome.Android Jones' installation inside the HP Antarctic dome.

From rendering award-winning animated films to propelling cutting-edge research on the International Space Station, HP’s lineup of Workstations are known for powering the most innovative—and compute-intensivetypes of work.

At the Coachella Music and Art Festival this week, HP can add immersive art installations to the long list of Workstation-powered creativity.

HP partnered with visual artists Android Jones and Eric Paré at Coachella, where they’ve installed mind-blowing, immersive installations for festival-goers to experience at the HP Antarctic dome and the HP Lounge.

At the heart of both of the art experiences are HP Workstations, which brought powerful technology to the artists’ fingertips.

 

Painting with light

Photographer Eric Paré tapped HP Workstations to create an interactive “light painting” installation called “Kinetic Art.”

Light painting in the "Kinetic Art" installation at the HP Lounge.Light painting in the "Kinetic Art" installation at the HP Lounge.His technique involves using dozens of high-speed cameras to capture moving light trails against a dark background. The composite images, taken in 120 degrees around his subject, creates dynamic shapes in an explosion of color for a one-of-a-kind photo.

As the cameras snap in succession, participants can use the motion of their bodies to leave a trail of light. The resulting few seconds of video can be rendered out into a still image or shared as an animated gif on social media.

Capturing each image required a custom rig made up of some 28 cameras and two HP Workstations, which Paré said “made the whole experience super-smooth.”

“No matter how optimized is our software, there's a lot of processing going on here,” he said. “HP gave us the best performance we've ever had so far.”

 

Enter the Antarctic

The centerpiece of HP’s Coachella experience is housed inside 60-foot tall geodesic dome, dubbed the “Antarctic,” that brings digital artist Android Jones’ vision to life.

Festival-goers can lounge on bean bag chairs inside the dome and watch an 8-minute show that combines animated digital art and music in a sequence that’s right out of Jones’ imagination.2017-04-19_15-17-10.jpg

He describes it as a journey of colorful, shifting, organic shapes that starts with molecular imagery that slowly builds on itself to form more complex objects, including a massive eyeball. The second half of the piece is a visual trip where the viewer is “flying through this interdimensional kaleidoscope and merry-go-rounds of archetypes, shapes and faces,” according to Jones, who describes himself as an “electro-mineralist.”

Creating this 360-degree experience inside the domethe largest installation of this type for Jonestook a massive amount of computing power to render the images projected onto the dome, which covered some 11,000 square feet.

Jones estimates each image had to be about 8,000 by 15,000 pixels in size in order to project them on the interior of the dome at 60 frames per second, a feat he described as the “highest output we have worked with.”

Scene from the Antarctic dome.Scene from the Antarctic dome.“We had to create huge map images to render out the frames and create the full-dome, immersive experience,” Jones said. “We needed to be working at the highest level of computation and we needed some really powerful workstations to render it within the timeline. That was made possible by the HP machines.”

In a separate installation inside the HP Lounge, Jones tapped HP’s OMEN gaming computers to create a more intimate experience with his art. In this installation, festival-goers could don VR headsets to manipulate and interact with a shorter version of what was playing on a loop in the Antarctic dome.

Jones and his tech team rendered art using the latest NVDIA graphics processors cranking at astonishing speedssome 11 teraflops, or about 11 trillion calculations per secondto generate a VR experience that can trick the human brain into thinking computer-generated imagery is real.

Jones, who’s toured with music festivals for more than a decade, said that if his audience has one thing in common, it’s that “people want to get their minds blown and they want to see something they’ve never seen before,” he said. “These tools enable a whole new level and dimension of creative possibilities.”

Weekend two of Coachella continues through April 23. For exclusive content, follow along on Twitter with the hashtag #HPCoachella and @HP.

 

Published: April 05, 2017

2017-04-05_13-43-31.jpgUnlike with PCs and software, it’s not well known among IT professionals that office printers make easy targets for hackers. Just like a PCs, they are connected to the network. But unlike PCs, they often have minimal or no restrictions to keep digital spies and thieves at bay.

A recent HP-sponsored Spiceworks survey found 43 percent of IT professionals surveyed in North America, EMEA and Asia Pacific say that they completely ignore printers in their endpoint security practices. Just 16 percent see printers as being at risk for a data breach.

Despite mounting evidence that hackers are increasingly targeting connected hardware instead of software, organizations’ IT departments continue to prioritize OS and application security over the office printer fleet.

HP is looking to change that, which is why it’s committed to engineering the most secure printers in the world. Part of that effort includes sounding the alarm and demonstrating just how important endpoint security is for the modern enterprise.

Today, during a well-attended security influencer event at its offices in London, the company invited tech press and analysts to get the full picture of why printer security is at the forefront of its hardware and software strategy.

At the summit, HP also announced the availability of a new lineup of security-optimized A3 multifunction printers (MFPs), the first in a series of HP’s advances into the A3 market – an opportunity that’s pegged at approximately $55 billion. 

“Despite what people believe, security issues aren’t limited to computers and networks,” said David Ryan, vice president and general manager of HP’s printer business in EMEA. “Today’s printers look a whole lot like PCs, and need to be protected accordingly.”

To underscore the point, HP invited a host of security experts at its two-day London summit to discuss the new A3 MFPs in action and learn about the future of printer security. Reformed hacker Michael Calce, aka “Mafiaboy,” keynoted the forum along with a host of other HP leaders.

Calce is best known for taking down some of the world’s largest e-commerce sites and a major search engine when he was just 15 years old. While he launched his attacks through more conventional paths, Calce now views printers and other Internet-connected devices as one of the most concerning vulnerabilities open to hacking. 

“Printers are everywhere in organizations, and they’re a wide-open prairie where hackers will roam free if companies don’t put the proper obstacles in their way,” says Calce. “That’s why it’s so important for companies like HP to build automated security into next-generation imaging devices.”"Mafiaboy" Michael Calce"Mafiaboy" Michael Calce

The new lineup of A3 devices, which HP said are already shipping to customers, are no exception. In addition to making improvements that both lower the costs of printing and servicing of A3 machines, HP has integrated its own security offerings to create a breakthrough portfolio with the industry’s best device, document and data security.

“Modern printers are fully functioning clients on networks, just like PCs, making them clearly as vulnerable to attack as any connected device,” said Nick Lazaridis, president of HP’s EMEA operations. “We’ve completely reinvented our A3 copiers to better detect and halt attacks that could take down entire networks or companies.”

The refreshed A3 MFPs lineup is set to include some of the world’s most advanced printer security features:   

  • HP SureStart: This feature validates the integrity of BIOS and firmware when a printing and imaging device boots up, then reverts to a safe or “golden copy” mode if it finds the system has been corrupted.
  • Whitelisting: A security measure that ensures only authentic, certified HP code is loaded into memory and reboots the printer if anomalies are detected, returning it to a safe state.
  • Run-Time Intrusion Detection: This safeguard constantly checks for anomalies and automatically reboots the machine if an attack is identified, effectively eliminating the threat.
  • HP JetAdvantage Security Manager: An attribute that automatically ensures the company’s security policies are enforced on printers when they are deployed.

Taken individually, any one of these features could help organizations close a critical gap in their IT security strategies. But by packaging them together, along with a host of other encryption and consulting services, HP is delivering a tightly knit collection of “self-healing” capabilities to automatically safeguard printers and office networks.

The three PageWide platforms and 13 LaserJet platforms in the A3 roster benefit from a new, cloud-based proprietary data analytics agent called HP Smart Device Services (SDS). This monitors, tests and diagnoses service needs across the A3 line, increasing overall efficiency. The HP PageWide Enterprise and Pro platforms also make color printing more affordable while providing best-in-class print speeds.

To learn more about the A3 printers and their capabilities, click hereHP's A3 MFP portfolioHP's A3 MFP portfolio